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Now displaying: April, 2019
Apr 30, 2019

Did you know that driving a Tesla or a Prius causes more CO2 emissions than a diesel car? Find out more as Craig talks about it with Jim Polito.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

Driving A Tesla Results In More CO2 Than A Mercedes Diesel Car, Study Finds

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/30/2019

Driving A Tesla Model 3 Or A Prius - Causes More CO2 Emissions -Study Out Of Germany

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody Craig Peterson here. And this morning, I had a really great chat. I use the whole segment with Jim Polito this morning. Because he was really into this study that I talked a bit about on Saturday. So we want to do even more detail than I did on my radio show that came out of Germany, showing that the Mercedes C220D, yes, the D stands for diesel. That Mercedes in over its lifetime emits less CO2 per kilometer than a Tesla Model 3. So here we go with Jim. Oh, and I got cut off in the middle. I'm going to be interested to hear what they had to say when that happened too.

Jim Polito 0:47
Here he is. The man. He's not a myth. But he is a legend. I'm talking about our Tech Talk guru Craig Peterson. We're going to talk some interesting stuff about cars and CO2. Joining me now. Here he is, Craig Peterson. Hello, sir.

Craig 1:03
Hey, good morning. How are you doing, Jim? 

Jim 1:08
I'm good. I'm good. I was when I got the material from you. I said, Oh, boy, this is right up my alley. This is like the plastic bag ban. Everybody out there trying to do something, be a do-gooder. And then you're not really doing any good. You're actually making things worse. You're telling me that the zero emission Tesla Model 3 will actually produce more CO2, not out of its tailpipe but more CO2 than a Mercedes diesel. Tell me. I love it. Well, you know, I think that's why you put it at the top of the list for today. So you knew that I would, I would eat this one up. Tell me how this is possible.

Craig 1:58
Well, this is really, really interesting. And it what it goes back to Jim, if I have to boil this all down, it goes back to government interference. And yes, I'm calling it interference, government interference in the natural course of Science and Technology. You know, what's happened here is similar to what happened when, remember we said, Oh, we've got to start making ethanol and putting ethanol into our gas tanks, because it's going to cut back on emissions, it's going to cut back on CO2. Remember that whole thing? Right?

Jim 2:34  
Yes, yes.

Craig 2:36 
And what state is of absolute first voting for the president in the nation when it comes to the primary?

Jim 2:44
If you get rid of the caucus Iowa. The real voting is in New Hampshire.

Craig 2:49
It is. But Iowa is number one. It's the first, right?

Jim 2:53
Yeah. it is. It's a caucus. Yeah.

Craig 2:55
And when what happens in Iowa, what do they grow? What's their economy out there?

Jim 3:01
They grow that stuff. That they make into ethanol that clogs my old carburetor on my old Harley, yes. They make ethanol.

Craig 3:13
Yeah. And it destroys small engines and everything else. So it has been a literal disaster. It is caused massive die off in the Gulf of Mexico, because the farmers are now trying to grow corn all the way along the Mississippi Delta, not delta, but the Mississippi River, right? They're trying to grow the corn to be able to make the cellulose to make the ethanol to go into our gas as as mandated. Remember, President Obama was trying to up into 15, or even 20% of the fuel we buy to be ethanol. So they're trying to grow it. They're using all these fertilizers that get into the water supply. And are killing, there is a huge have a have a look at a map, if you don't believe me, there is a huge die off hundreds of square miles of everything in the Gulf of Mexico, dying by the mouth of the Mississippi River. And we got major red tides caused by this. And another thing is okay, so it has been a disaster. And by the way, the ethanol in your gasoline has ended up causing more CO2 to go into the air than if we did not have ethanol than the gasoline. So there's an example of what happened when governments rushed into fear, right? Here's, this is another one now. There was a study some years ago, that showed that a Hummer produced less emissions, then the Toyota Prius.

Jim 4:52
What? It that how we're gonna get to the Tesla 3 in this thing, because now you're getting close to a vehicle that's got a battery is that the key here?

Craig 5:02
The battery is kind of the key. But there's one other thing that Hummer's going to last maybe a million miles with engine rebuild .

Jim 5:10
Yeah. They are. They're very. Yeah, they absolutely are.

Craig 5:13
Think of all of the energy that goes into manufacturing a new Prius every couple of hundred thousand miles. And then all of the energy that goes into making the batteries. Now the batteries are the killer here, when it comes to the Tesla Model 3, when it comes to the Prius and some of these other full electric cars that are out there right now, these zero emissions cars. And what happens is that they have to mine, of course, these minerals, right?

Jim 5:43
Right. So for the battery. Yeah.

Craig 5:46
Yeah, exactly. So one of the places they mind is in Quebec, just north of us. And they mind some of these minerals. And by the way, it is so toxic, that NASA uses the area around these mines in Canada, but at least not in the US, right? It's so toxic, that nothing lives for miles and miles, all vegetation is dead. There are no animals. And we use it, NASA uses it to test landers, lunar landers. Martian landers.

Jim 6:21 
Oh my god. Really?

Craig 6:22
Okay, so you have all that toxicity. But anyways, they take that they ship those components via truck, via ship. And it makes quite a nice little trip, it goes to China, it goes to Japan, it goes back to China, it goes back to the US, it's made into a special kind of foam and everything. It's incredible. So add everything up. That goes into the manufacturing of that Tesla Model 3, everything. And then the amount of CO2, yeah, that's used are created. We're talking about that Tesla Model 3 being 20 having 20% more average emissions over its lifetime than this Mercedes Benz C220  diesel. 

Jim 7:15
So let me just put it in, we're talking with our friend Craig Peterson our Tech Talk guru. Let me put it to this, right. So diesel, which is number two oil, it's it's also how I heat my home. Okay, that stuff that they pump out of the ground, don't refine as much as they refined gasoline. The stuff that is the dirtiest pump when you go to the gas station, because it's oil and it picks up dust and dirt and everything else that you put into a diesel engine and then fire up with glow plugs. Okay, that maybe make it a little faster with a turbo charger? That stuff is cleaner than trying to drive around in a Tesla or in a Prius. That's actually better for the environment.

Craig 8:04
A hundred percent with like, now there's debate, you know, there's there's knots and things, but the emissions from the diesel are also heavier. So those emissions end up coming down to the ground. Of course now with these new clean diesels are just absolutely incredible. But you mentioned pumping it out of the ground Jim. These numbers include all of the manufacturing of the diesel itself and trucking it around and everything else. So again, here now I am rather I've known this for a long time, right? Because I've looked at these numbers for years. This is a new study that just came out of Germany. And...

Jim 8:50
Oh, you know what it is. Danny, we Danny, we lost him. Do you know what happened?

Danny 8:57 
They're on to us.

Jim 8:58 
Danny. It's the green new deal.

Danny 9:02 
Maybe maybe was Elon Musk?

Jim 9:03 
Steve. Steve, did anything happen on your end? Did anything? Any sparks or anything? Nothing? No? You sure? I think he's calling back.

Danny 9:15
Let's just assume it was Russia.

Jim 9:19
Hold on. Is that you sir?

Craig 9:22
It is. 

Jim 9:24
You know what it was? Alexandria. It was Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. It was not the Russians, because so the Russians, the only thing that they make any money off of is their oil. So the Russians would not cut off what you were preaching there. It was AOC. So go ahead. Go ahead. I said it was talking about pumping in out of the ground.

Craig 9:49
Right and you these numbers include all of that the pump it on the ground, the transporting it, the processing of it, as you mentioned, is much less processed than the gasoline is these are this is a study done in Germany, they make, you know, electric car emissions and other countries are going to vary a little bit depending on the mix of, of coal. And you know, New Hampshire even burns wood for some of the electricity, you know, some of the cleaner fuels, but it kind of gets me upset because this brings me back to something else. I gotta mention this Jim. I'm sorry. I'm going along in this segment.

Jim 10:24 
No it's ok.

Craig 10:26
My daughter in, I think, you know, my one of my daughters is over in Norway now and she's helping to lead this project. Right. And Norway, they give a tax what they do in Norway, there's a 25% VAT. So sales tax on everything. So if you buy an electric car, they don't charge that tax.  

Jim 10:50
If you buy an electric car?

Craig 10:50
Yeah, exactly. And they're thinking about getting rid of it. But they're not sure. But the reason they like electric cars is it be keep it because it keeps their environment clean. They're not worried about these cesspools of chemical mixtures that are sitting in China and India and other places.

Jim 11:12
Yeah. They're worried about their little pretty little, and that is See, that's the thing. This is where I and we've got to wrap it up now, where I go off on the plastic bag thing. Every community bans plastic bags, so we don't want to see them on the roadside. They're choking the whales. 90% of that plastic comes from India, Africa, and Asia. There are 10 rivers in the world that produce 90% of the plastic in the ocean, and none of them are in North or South America. None of them. There are 2 in Africa. 

Craig 11:48   
I wish it wouldn't knee-jerk, Jim. but it's. I don't know what it is. But people have gotten worse in knee-jerking nowadays.

Jim 11:56
They don't want to feel like they're part of the cause. Look, environmentalism has become the new religion. That's my opinion. It's the new religion. But anyway, Craig, that was fascinating the explanation of all the filth that goes into building a wonderful, clean car. So if folks want that story and more information from our tech talk guru, all you do is text my name, Jim to this number.

Craig 12:21
855-385-5563. That's 855-385-5553.

Jim 12:31
That's right. And standard data and text rates apply. But it's a clean transaction between you. And Craig Peterson. He won't sell your name. He won't annoy you with constant text. He'll get you the information you need when you need it. Thank you, sir.

Craig 12:50
Hey, thanks, Jim. Have a great day.

Craig 12:54
Hey, everybody, have a great day. As you can tell, I was having some fun this morning with Jim and I'll be back tomorrow with more fun with Ken and Matt, and all of our friends up in Maine, throughout Maine, all of the stations were on up there. So keep an eye out for that. Also, if you missed my offer last time of this DIY cyber security course what to do, how to do it. I went through everything. I was just amazed. I printed it all up the other day. And I'm looking at close to a ream of paper sitting there on the printer. I haven't taken that off yet. All of the stuff I covered and that's double sided. It's just crazy, all this stuff. And I didn't print out the bonuses either. But anyways, I am going to be launching another course coming up, it's not going to be alive. I'm not going to do as much live coaching. And we're doing that to keep the costs down. So that's coming up in a couple of weeks. Make sure you're on my weekly show notes email list so you find out about it. Then that's just http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe, you'll see it on my homepage to http://CraigPeterson.com. Get on that you're going to get my weekly show notes, including everything I talked about, with Jim and I talked about on my radio show and all of these other guys. And it'll come in your email box every Saturday morning. I'm planning on starting up another thing here shortly, where it'll probably be on Wednesday mornings, and It's a Security Thing. So that should be fine as well. And I'll let you know when that happens too. So have a great day. And we'll talk with you all soon. Bye bye.

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Don't miss any episode from Craig. Visit http://CraigPeterson.com/itunes. Subscribe and give us a rating!

Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

Follow me on Twitter for the latest in tech at:

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Apr 29, 2019

Did you know that driving a Tesla results in more CO2 emissions? Craig discussed this with Jack Heath, as well as Senator Hassan's aide stealing gigabytes of data from the her office.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles 

Driving A Tesla Results In More CO2 Than A Mercedes Diesel Car, Study Finds

Former NH Sen. Hassan Aide Stole Gigabytes Of ‘High Value’ Data
---

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/29/2019

Driving A Tesla Results In More CO2 - Senate Gets Hit By Insider Hackers - Sen Hassan

 

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. I've been a little reluctant with some of my Security Thing podcasts. I have just been so busy and I just don't think I'm going to be able to get to it this week either because I am going to the derby. I'm going to be out in Kentucky. So it's going to be a busy week for me. How's that for fun, eh? The private boxes and everything. I'll man's can be fun. Anyhow. I'll return and report next week. This morning I was on with Jack Heath on New Hampshire today, which of course covers the whole state of New Hampshire and parts of all of the surrounding states. And we had a good little discussion. And by the way, Jack just won an award. Because if you know New Hampshire at all, you know our state sport is politics, right? We are first in the nation when it comes to primary. We are a very small state, we actually get to press the flesh with these Congress critters, people running for office, particularly presidents. So we see them all. We talked to them all. We vet them all. So it's a big deal. So Jack just won an award for his coverage of politics, because he has everybody on both sides of the aisle in the middle as well. So it's kind of fun. So congratulations to Mr. Jack Heath for that. And this morning, we talked about a couple of problems and problems the democrats have been having when it comes to hiring bad IT talent. And that came out right home to New Hampshire. That jack corrected me I was calling her senator Hassan I guess she pronounces it Hassan. So Senator Hassan and her aide, big story there. So we talked about that. And then another study out showing that these electric cars are not zero emissions vehicles. In fact, they produce about 20% more carbon dioxide. Then some of the diesel's out there. So here we go with Mr. Heath. Have a great day everybody.

Jack Heath 2:06
in the next hour, but right now joining us on the Auto Fair listener lines is our own Tech Tech Talk guy. Tech Talk guy Craig Peterson. How are you sir?

Craig 2:14
Hey, I'm doing well. By the way. We have a horse running this year but not in the Kentucky Derby yet. But my daughter also of course from New Hampshire, we raised some horses here. She's now for the last couple of years been a manager to farm out in Kentucky called Winning Star when they won the Triple Crown last year. Justify was their horse. 

Jack 2:36
Wow, I've heard the name. Good for your daughter. You must be a proud dad.

Craig 2:39
Yeah, isn't that neat? I'm going to be out there this weekend. In fact for the running of the Kentucky Derby so yeah. It will be fun.

Jack 2:46
Good stuff. And hold on before I get to your stuff I just gonna say it's not really I guess, high tech talk but if you heard about the two Canadian suspects who are, I think they're going to be charged they formally they basically one some alert folks in Hudson notice one person kept going back to this ATM but I guess they they made an arrest of this ring. But the ATM they rip it off in Massachusetts and in I guess New Hampshire so they get a lot of cash for the other one I thought of Craig on Friday, I talked about this Seacoast online had a story out at Kittery, Maine. Did you hear this one? 45 victims, they say in the Kittert area alone. And the suspects' four men from Florida. If I have the story, correct, were basically using the United States Postal, you know the the delivery system that will tell you something's coming. And somehow they stole some identities and they were ordering these credit cards. And they would track the delivery on the USPS whatever system on their phone, and then show up at people's homes and intercept. They used their names intercept the cards before the person even got them. And you know, it was a credit card scam, but they basically made the arrest. So a lot of scams.

Craig 3:56
Yeah, there are and in fact, there's an article up this week saying that falling victim to one of these scams, not this type in Kittery, but where you get an email scam is actually an early sign of dementia. It was very interesting article. So here's what I do to deal with that. And I think it's pretty simple. When you have a bank credit card or checks, because I still use checks okay, I do not have them delivered to the house. I have them delivered to the local bank branch.

Jack 4:28 
That's smart. That's smart.

Craig 4:29 
And then they call me and say, Yeah, because people have been doing this for years stealing from from mailboxes as well. So good. Good advice. Good warning. Hey, two quick things here. One is, you know, we talked about the F150 and how efficient that Ford truck is when it comes to CO2 emissions. And the government how to this like the new Tesla Model 3 is a zero emissions vehicle, we are paying our tax dollars for every person that buys one of the these cars and many others, although they've hit their limit of 200,000. We'll see what happens with Congress. But a new study out again here from Germany, this time, saying that these so-called zero emissions vehicles produce about 20% more carbon dioxide, than diesel Mercedes in this case. And we remember last time we were talking about the F150. And the Wall Street Journal's warning as well saying that because of this study, again, we want to point out here's a quote, recall the false promises about corn and cellulosic ethanol, you know, the stuff made from from corn, false promises, it didn't help. It made a lot of things worth it worse. It destroys small engines. And I think this is another example of why we want the free market to decide what the winner is. When it comes to our environment. The US has even been ahead of every country in the world. Even after we pulled out of a Paris Climate accord. We are beating everyone else when it comes to the lowered CO2 emissions and also our atmosphere. You know.

Jack 6:12
There's a story that's not always framed that way. We're always the problem.

Craig 6:16
Exactly. And it turns out, we're not. Very interesting study. I have it up on my website. And then I don't know if you saw this. Senator, Hassan's former aide here. And what had happened, this guy's name was is Jackson Cosko. He entered into a plea deal about a week ago. And the statement of facts in that deal says that from July to October 2018. Just last fall, he engaged in extraordinary extensive data theft from Senator Hassan's office.

Jack 6:47  
Or Hassan.

Craig 6:48
Hassan. I'm sorry. Hassan. The theft occurred by the way after he was fired by the senator in May, and then was hired by democratic Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, that gave him access to the house computer network. And another aide apparently of our senator was going in, give him a key so he could go in at night, he was putting keyloggers and everything else in which it's just amazing reminds you of what happened with a Wasserman Schultz here last year, who was the head of the DNC and also of course, a congressperson. And there was a plea deal with him as well. And this was the Imran Awan scandal that occurred, and he was doing it for a government of US Congress people on the democrat side. It's just we've got to be more careful, Jack. You know, he was putting keyloggers on, which means you have a just a quick look at your computer. If you have a wired keyboard, check at the back make sure there isn't an extra little fob on the back of your computer that recording every keystroke, because that's how you get in. That's how many bad guys get in and sometimes even install it in in software, but he did plead guilty and unlike Awan, it looks like he's going to serve some time here. We'll see what happens.

Jack 8:12
Alright Craig. Thank you very much for your Tech Talk update. Thank you.

Craig 8:16 
Hey, thanks.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

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Apr 26, 2019

What is a green car?  It might surprise you. So be sure to listen in today.

Today I will unpack the problems with our new junior Senator Maggie Hassan. Yea, she hired someone who stole gigabytes of high-value data.

What do you think of Facial recognition?  Well, I will discuss some of the problems with the FBI facial recognition program.

WiFi? Is it bad for your health? I will talk about what a new study out of the Czech Republic found.  

If you think that by going to the cloud, your business is going to be safe, you have another thing coming to you. I will explain why in today's show.

Amazon? Wow, I can't believe they're doing this with books. If you have not heard about this, listen in.

There are a number of mental health apps available for your tablets and smartphones. Do you know what data they share?  It may surprise you.

For all this and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/27/2019

Driving A Tesla Increases CO2 Emissions - Sen Hassan Aid Stole Gigabytes Of Data

Craig Peterson 0:03 
Hi everybody. Craig Peterson here. We're about to get started with another one of our Saturday shows heard every Saturday morning here on these iHeart Radio broadcast channels. Yes, terrestrial radio. And I also have it out online. You can find it all at http://Craig Peterson.com. Well, today we are going to be covering a couple of articles that I think might be a bit of a surprise to you. One of them has to do with green cars. Now, if you've known me for a long time, you know that green cars aren't green. But but there's a study out we're going to talk about that yet another study, remember the one that said that the Hummer H2 was actually, no it was the H1 was actually greener than the Toyota Prius, while the new study up right here in New Hampshire, that's where I'm located Senator Hassan, her aid, stole gigabytes of high-value data. So we'll talk about that. And what happens when a business or in this case a government agency, has one of their employees go rogue? The FBI facial recognition program is under fire. WiFi? Is it bad for your health? A new study out and a very interesting article from the Czech Republic on that. If you think that by going to the cloud, your business is going to be safe. You have another thing coming to you. New research out on that. Amazon? Wow, I can't believe they're doing this with books. You might have heard about this with 1984 that George Orwell book a little while ago. Well, there's a whole lot here we're going to talk about. And mental health apps, and what data are they actually sharing. So here we go with all of our news that's fit for today.

Craig 2:02
So first up today, let's talk about driving your Tesla. Now they are cool. And I had a really interesting discussion with one of my daughters. She lives in Norway right now. She's running a huge project, autonomous ships for Kongsberg, which is just a huge shipping company. They well they make the controls and stuff for shipping. They just bought Rolls Royce marine here a few months back. And I was talking to her about Teslas because electric cars get a special subsidy in Norway. Now, here in the US, Tesla has already reached the 200,000 car mark. And the idea behind this was that they would provide, the federal government would provide extra money to help subsidize the purchase of electric cars, not just Teslas. But once they hit the 200,000 car mark, that subsidy would go away. And some of the Democrats in Congress are pretty busy right now trying to figure out how can they re-establish that deal, get that deal going again. And they may end up doing that. Well in Norway, they have similar things where the government is subsidizing electric vehicles, and to a very large point, because in Norway, right away, you don't have to pay the sales tax, which is 25% sales tax. Imagine that. And then it's a VAT, too. So it's not just the sales tax when you buy it, but there's sales tax every time a product changes hands, from manufacturing parts through distribution through the final retailer, and then you. So things are just crazy expensive there. And they have a great free market economy. Don't get me wrong, they are not a socialist country. None of the Scandinavian countries are socialist, but they are very heavily taxed and they do have a lot of government programs. So they were talking about getting rid of this subsidy, effectively a subsidy for electric cars, Tesla stock went down. And there's a lot of reasons it goes up and down, right? Well, here in the US what's the reason everybody seems to be giving for an electric car. Why do they want these electric vehicles? What's the big deal? Why does it matter? Well, here in the US, they're telling us this story that while it's more green, there's less carbon that goes into the atmosphere. And it's just it's a wonderful thing. And every Friday night, we get together all of us electric car owners, and we lock arms and we sing Kumbaya, right? And it's all because it's green. They're just wonderful vehicles. And you know that there's obviously some miss truths to that, let me put it that way. And in fact, there are there, it's just not true. And that's what the studies showing. In Norway, they're much more saying about this. And Norway, they're saying, hey, yeah, that these electric cars are not more green. But what we're trying to do is prevent the pollution in our environment, in our environment here in Norway. So we don't want these cars to, to be emitting all of this nastiness and trucks and things. We just want electric vehicles, we don't care that they're made in China and Japan, and that shipped all over, we don't care about the pollution they're causing worldwide and the fact that the recycling this stuff. It's just it's hazardous, right. But what we care about is we have clean air. Now, that to me, is a legitimate argument. I think there are legitimate arguments might be its cool technology. And the other argument might well be that you know, the air here tends to be a little bit cleaner. Now, of course, they're dumping all of the crap that there, their byproducts making these batteries in these cars. They're dumping them in the ocean in China and into the air and eventually gets here, all of this plastic in the ocean that's coming from these third world countries and communist countries that just don't care about it. Right. So this article is absolutely fascinating. And it's saying that driving a Tesla results in more CO2 than our Mercedes diesel does. So think about that for a minute. Diesel's have gotten a really bad name lately, because of some cheating that was done on an emissions test. Now, I put that cheating in air quotes, you saw that, right? If you're watching this http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. You saw me do that? Well, the reason I do that is the diesel's are it's a different type of emission. And when the engine is cold, they run different currently, then when the engine is warm, or when it's hot. And some of these tests that were being done by our EPA and the European Union, don't really give the diesel vehicles credit. And you know, Europe, if you've been there, if you've rented a car, even if you were driven around, you notice most of the cars were diesel, because, in fact, a lot of the gases that are emitted by the vehicles, it's better if it's diesel, it washes down more quickly out of the atmosphere. But they're worried about the nitrous oxide and some other things that can cause problems for some people. So you know, hey, I get that. So hydrogen methane technology that is being used right now in the new diesel's has made a huge, huge difference. So if you look at this a little bit closer here, I'm going to pull this article right up on the desk area go see now you can see it on YouTube on http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube.

Craig 8:02
It's touted as a zero-emission vehicle. Now we're talking about the Tesla Model 3, but in actuality, it creates more carbon dioxide dumped more into the air than a comparable diesel-powered car. And it's I love this article, when the CO2 emissions from the battery productions included, electric cars like Teslas are, in the best case slightly higher. We're talking about CO2 emissions here, in the best case, Teslas have slightly higher emissions of CO2 then a diesel engine, and our otherwise much higher and this is from a German Think Tank. And it's just absolutely fascinating here Daily Caller article that we're quoting from, and I love this picture they have of the Model 3 in the car show here in Toronto. So they looked electric car production in Germany, it's heavily reliant on coal power, we're in the US, of course, we burn coal, we burn wood, we have things that the left really hates, like, heaven forbid, we have nuclear power, which is course, frankly, the cleanest of all. And if the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, we get off of their hands, and use some of this new nuclear technology that was invented here, 30 years ago, we would be in incredible shape, there'd be almost no nuclear waste at all, because we can re-burn it and certain types of reactors and things but people just got completely scared about it. California is requiring automakers to cut greenhouse gas emissions in cars, producing lower emission vehicles buying credits, which is making people like Al Gore very rich right? At the federal level, the US government's giving you a $7500 per electric vehicle tax break. It's it just goes on and on. A study here from the University of Cologne, talking about what they found in responsible energy, which forgets it, right, and who wants responsible energy policies, it's just not out there right now. But a study released to 2018 also found that driving electric cars might come with higher emissions of diesel vehicles, largely because of the lithium-ion production. For those that are unaware. This lithium most of its harvested in Quebec, NASA uses the area for miles, hundreds of square miles around the lithium battery mine, if you will. NASA uses it for testing lunar landings because there is no life at all. And then that is shipped off over to China for pre-processing and shipped to Japan, to turn it into a type of foam, is shipped back to China to finalize the battery components, shipped back to the US to be installed in the Tesla. Think about all of the carbon dioxides from that. A Manhattan Institute study from Tony teen found that putting more electric cars on the road would likely increase emissions compared to internal combustion engine vehicles. Now, you know that I have a libertarian band. So part of my dislike of this whole thing is that you know, come on people bottom line. Why should the government be the one that's deciding that's what the next best technology is going to be? Does that make any sense to you really doesn't make any sense that the government should be deciding, hey, listen, we're going to bet your tax money on electric vehicles rather than hydrogen fuel cells or some of these other technologies that might win. Again, let the private sector decide. And this is yet another area that our government has become socialist with a government trying to control the means production, the types of production, trying to incentivize it, etc, etc, right? Stuff that I obviously just don't agree with. But I guess you guys already know that. Right? Okay.

Craig 12:12
So next up, let's see if I can make this work here for YouTube. That's http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube, I think it was this key combination. That didn't work. Yeah, I'm doing something wrong. So what I'm going to do is this, because I'm pretty sure that will work. Yes, there you go. Okay, so now you can see the article. This is from the Daily Caller, this is former senator has a son from New Hampshire, you know who she is what her one of her former aides now is in very, very much trouble. Now we know the Democrats have been, I'm going to say it, I'm going to say it out. Because this is true. They have been stupid when it comes to their IT people, they have not hired, in most cases, the people they should have hired, and we got a listener out there. So hat tip to Guy if you're listening, who have decided that because I keep talking about these problems with security, that he's going to take up a career in security. So he signed up for this six-month course, kind of getting started in cybersecurity. Once he's done with that, it'll take a year or so of him having real-life experience in it, and then he'll be really quite good. But man alive here, they missed all kinds of red flags about what this guy was doing. But here's the bottom line. This is a plea agreement that he did sign apparently extraordinary, extensive data theft scheme is what it was called. He installed keylogging devices that picked up every keystroke on these machines. So a keylogger, in case you're not aware, if you're using a keyboard, with a USB cable, and then that USB cable plugs into the back of your computer, as someone can insert on the back of that computer, one of these keyloggers and the way this keylogger ends up working is that you're typing your keys, and they're all being intercepted by this little USB device. So you might want to right away, especially if you are democrat senator, apparently, you might want to right away go and check the back of your computer and see if there if your keyboard is plugged in directly. Now, you know, if you watch for a while I use Macs, right? So here's an example of the mouse I use. And on the Mac, it's Bluetooth wireless, but it also has available here, a USB port, right? It's actually one of Apple's proprietary port. And I have the also the keyboard here. This is what I'm using on my iMac, in fact, to control the video that we're creating for YouTube on that iMac. So that's what that's all about right there. Okay, and that was really nice. It's really handy. But what Apple does is everything is super-encrypted. In fact, in order for me to configure this trackpad to my Mac, I have to plug it in via cable. It does some handshaking it automatically configured the iMac for this trackpad or this keyboard. Same things true for laptops of using external devices. So Apple has gone the extra extra mile.

Craig 15:39
If you're using a regular Bluetooth keyboard like here's my other computer here. This is a standard older Mac, keyboard, and mouse I have it in the mount. So it's all together. But this uses regular Bluetooth and regular Bluetooth has encryption as well. So typically, generally speaking, your Bluetooth is going to be safer than using a wired keyboard or wired mouse because you can install these keyloggers right so that's kind of what I was getting at here.

Craig 16:16 
So back to our friend here at senator Hassan's office. What she did is or he did I should say is he installed these keyloggers so they usually have to come back to get back keylogger in order to read it. But remember, if you're typing on your computer, what are you typing? Oh, a username and a password. And usually, those are pretty well identifiable pretty easily identifiable. So apparently, Jackson Cosko worked with an unnamed accomplice and other Hassan employee who reportedly lent him a key that he used to enter the office at night and who allegedly tried to destroy evidence for him after the fact. So Cosko accepted responsibility for the events revealed by federal prosecutors in court last Friday. Apparently was doing it from July and October. But he really did a lot more than that. It kind of goes on here in this article from the Daily Caller, he sneaked into her office, reportedly multiple times at night gathered dozens of gigabytes of data, including usernames and passwords belonging to Senate employees, okay, like really come on guys. Tens of thousands of emails, internal documents, credit card information blog, the Senate employee social security numbers, blah, blah, blah. So be careful out there. These IT people are not what they appear to be in many cases. And of course, the huge thing with the Democrats. And I couldn't believe how they responded when it was disclosed that Wasserman Schultz's IT people had had just committed me incredible crimes all the way across the board. And she was throwing the tantrum or when they tried to investigate. In fact, I don't think the FBI ever got to fully investigate this thing.

Craig 18:10 
So anyhow, keep an eye on your IT people. Make sure you know who they are. Make sure they're of good character. It's easy enough to do basic background check nowadays, you can get them done for 20, 30 bucks online, just check in public record and make sure they look okay. Okay. And it's difficult. I get it. It's difficult to hire the right person. because, frankly, how do you know who the right person is? What do you know about IT? What do you know about security, it's difficult, you got to find somebody that's been in a long time.

Craig 18:43 
Alright, so next up, let's talk about this FBI problem here. This is from NextGov.com. I'll put it up on my screen here http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. Of course, you guys the audio guys listen to the podcast. And here on iHeart Radio as well. You guys are my primary audience. Okay. But if you want to see some of these articles, I put them up here on the screen. But this is huge. The FBI reportedly has ignored, for the most part, the GAO, the Government Accountability Offices concerned over its use of facial recognition technology, in criminal investigations, its new technology, its kinda neat. They can scan all kinds of public cameras and photos as well as records, the FBI has to try and find suspects and close cases. That part's fine. But apparently, what they've been doing is they're pulling from a database of more than 30 million mug shots and other photos. And while they're doing this, they're looking for matches, right? Doesn't that make sense? And they're trying to find the matches, they're trying to get the right people, but they get bad matches, they get mismatches with people who were nowhere in the area. Okay, I get that. You figure it out, right, and you take care of it. But apparently what they've been doing is they have been going after them and prosecuting and trying to get convictions. The auditors and the GAO recommended that the FBI tests the accuracy of these things at least once a year, make improvements, etc, that are very interesting. So if you're charged nowadays by the FBI or local prosecutor, what's the right thing to do? Because you weren't in the area. You didn't do it. Are they going to convict you on bad evidence now because they trust the computer so much? I don't know.

Craig 20:49  
Okay, so next up from the TechRepublic, we got an article about WiFi, how many people complain about WiFi saying it's bad for our health? Well, another study out and I've been saying this for a long time. And man that I feel bad one time I was keynoting at an annual event for it was for a bank. And I was their keynote speaker for their annual shareholder's meeting and talked about the future of technology. Where it's going? What's happening? And a lady came up to me and said, so what do you think about radiation from phones, from cell phones? And I said, well, you know, I've been an advanced class amateur radio operator for many, many decades. I have had a lot of radiation from these radios exposed to me, I've never had anything happen. And most of the studies that have been done about ham radio operators have said, hey, there's nothing definitive about a problem. So bottom line, you know, doesn't really matter. It's not a big deal, that you have this happening. And then she said, you know, you can see the tears welling up in her eyes. And she says, Well, I think it was her husband had been diagnosed with cancer. And they said that it was because he had the phone up to his head all the time using it at work. And that work should be paying for all this medical treatment and, and pain and suffering and stuff. And man made me feel really bad. But the truth is, there are no strong ties between these various types of radiation. And the biggest problem I think people have is a misunderstanding. We call it radiation. But this isn't x rays. This isn't, you know, the radiation you get from outer space, it is non-ionizing radiation. And radiation from a scientific definition is just energy moving through space, it's not a big deal. So these new WiFi devices that are going to be rolled out all over the country for 5G, they're going to be everywhere. And that's one of the reasons you can get such high data rates. They are everywhere. And so you're going to be close to them. Even mount them on our houses, on telephone poles are going to be just everywhere. But the RF signals, these radio frequency signals that are generated by WiFi, by Bluetooth, by your phones, in any device that's sold legally in the US is tested. And you know, I'm not one for trusting government testing necessarily, right. But in reality, the safety limits are just incredible. You know, you're talking about 500 milliwatts, and I have routinely been transmitting at 50 watts, which is a lot more power, and I haven't experienced any problems and, and 100 watts on some of the HF bands and even higher. So studies just, there was one of University of Barcelona, looking at RF exposure of children, ages 8 to 18 in Europe over three day period, WiFi represented 4% of total RF exposure. 62% of the RF exposure came from cellular base stations. 23% from broadcast TV and radio. And 10% from a nearby cell phone. So the exposure is approximate point .001% of that of the safety limits imposed by the European Commission, which is even tighter than here in the US. So back to this article, again, TechRepublican on http://CraigPeterson.com. You'll see it. WiFi is just not bad for your health.

Craig 24:45
So we're going to whip through a couple more here pretty quickly because we only have a couple of minutes left. If you think that switching over to cloud services is going to make you safe. I'm afraid there's another thing coming for you. Because right now cloud services are the Wild West. And various cloud services have various amounts of safety with them, if you will, they have really kind of an abysmal record. You think about all of these huge data breaches that have happened on the cloud recently. And it's incredible, like 2 billion records found on the cloud from one of these cloud services providers just in the last couple of months. So just because you're using Office 365, or you're using some other type of cloud services, Salesforce.com, etc, does not mean it's safe. Now, I'm not saying that they aren't relatively safe, but there's a new study out. And this is from the global phish report from Avanan. And they looked at 55 million emails sent to Microsoft Office 365 and Google G Suite account. Those are the big guys. If you have an email for your business, you're probably either with Office 365, or Google G Suite. And they found roughly 1% of all messages or phishing threats that use malicious attachments or links. And of those, 25% that were marked safe by the Exchange Online protection built into Office 365. And delivered to us. So just a little word of warning there. Just because you're using the cloud service does not mean that your emails are safe.

Craig 26:31
I've got to bring this one up too. Amazon, they are burning books. And I don't know what to do about this. You know, remember Jeff Bezos said that he was going to be you know, open, they sell any books, he wanted the exchange of ideas, which is, of course, a very libertarian classic liberal way of doing things. But now apparently he is removing books from the store. We know already that he has removed books from people's iPads etc. So in February this year, they banned a number of books from white identitarian Jared Taylor, a book called The White Nationalist Manifesto by Greg Johnson. You may completely disagree with these guys. Right. But again, they need to have their voices out there as part of the public debate. They also banned, had bans on Holocaust revisionists books in 2017, a purge of all books by the controversial pickup blogger and author Daryush Valizadeh, I guess it is. Many others, many others. Amazon's refused, by the way, to take down a book defending pedophilia on first amendment grounds. They have not removed certain books that are up there that are anti-christian, even though there have been complaints about them. So they got to get their act together.

Craig 27:57
And if you're using a mental health app, you can see it on my screen here http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube, be careful out there because of the data they're sharing. Alright, have a great week. I am out of time. We will chat next week and of course during the week as well on my podcasts. http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. Take care, everybody. Bye-bye.

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Related articles:

Driving A Tesla Results In More CO2 Than A Mercedes Diesel Car, Study Finds

Former NH Sen. Hassan Aide Stole Gigabytes Of ‘High Value’ Data

Wi-Fi Is Not Actually Bad For Your Health, Scientists Say

FBI’s Facial Recognition Programs Under Fire Over Privacy, Accuracy Concerns

Using Cloud Email? Office 365? You’re Not Safe From Phishing Attacks

Amazon Has Been On A Digital Book Burning Spree For Months

That Mental Health App Might Share Your Data Without Telling You
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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

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Apr 24, 2019

It's Wednesday morning. Time for the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. Today they talked about the Samsung Galaxy Fold, the fake 5-star reviews on Amazon, and how much your tax info is worth on the dark web.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

5-Star Phonies: Inside The Fake Amazon Review Complex

Here’s How Much Your Tax Info Is Worth On The Dark Web

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/24/2019

Samsung Fold Problem - How Much Your Tax Info Sells For - Matt's Bad Amazon Headphones

Craig Peterson  0:00
Hey, everybody, we talked this morning about the Samsung fold problem, how much your tax and photos worth on the dark web and Matt bought some headphones online on Amazon based on the star ratings. And guess what? They aren't so good. So we talked about that as well. So here we go Craig Peterson with Ken and Matt in Maine, this morning.

Matt Gagnon0:26
WGAN Wednesday morning, that time and that day means Craig Peterson, man about town and tech guru joins us as he does now. What's going on, Craig?

Craig 0:37
Hey, good morning. Caribou still has snow on the ground. But that's a shocker. 

Ken Altshuler 0:45
Which is why we should annex it to Canada. It doesn't belong in America, get rid of it.

So I didn't see this on your, we're not going, I'm sure you've talked about the Samson folding tablet fiasco. And since I love to talk about how Samsung sucks. Any comment on Samsung?

Craig 1:09
You summed it up there in one word.

Ken 1:11
Well, thank you for joining us.

Matt 1:16
Oh, you fanboys.

Ken 1:17
I haven't had that with my iPhone, Matt.

Matt 1:19
At least they're trying to develop something new.

Craig 1:22
It's a problem. And of course, we're talking about these folding things. With the Galaxy Fold. The screens are breaking and people are kind of getting upset. But it's a cool new technology. Matt's right for once, Ken. You know.

Ken 1:37
Matt's never right. Ever.

Craig 1:40
Ever? Oh, come on. I was trying to give you one Matt. So here's a problem. It's, how do I even explain this? Okay, here we go. I've got one Matt. The Apple MacBook Pro has a similar problem. And that is that when you're bending these things, sometimes those cables are, and the conductors are extremely, extremely small. And when you bend them a lot, of course you get mechanical breakdowns and that's what's happening right now with the galaxy fold and with the MacBook Pro, in fact, both companies are scrambling Apple's scrambling to get a new MacBook Pro out this September. And it looks like they're kind of pushing it up a little sooner than they had wanted to. Because of the two big problems with the MacBook Pro. One is the keyboard is still an issue for a lot of people. I just I don't like the feel of it. I don't. Ken, you like the feel your MacBook Pro keyboard right?

Ken 2:42
I do. Well, I kind of like the raised a little better. I've got a use of this. But that when I was raised lettering, I liked it a little better.

Craig 2:52
Yeah, I'd like to the old one little bit better. And then there's some problems with the cables in the screen there. And then the Galaxy Fold from Samsung is incredibly new technology. No one's really tried to do this quite this way before. And so it's it's kind of falling on its face. But also Samsung doesn't have the profit margin Apple does to invest in some of this stuff. So it's impressive what they did. But I'm not sure it'll ever be, well ever is a long time. Right. But anytime soon? 

Matt 3:22
I don't know, I guess I don't understand. And I'm a Samsung aficionado, if you will. So I don't get why you'd want it. I don't want to fold my phone. Is it just because you want to get a bigger screen? I guess. And so you can fold it that way? I don't care that much. Yeah, I mean, where is the demand for this? That I mean, I want to have a tablet, but I wanted the size of a phone. I really don't a tablet the size of my phone.

Craig 3:47
Well, it's the phablet thing, right? But let's go back again to Apple as an example, Steve Jobs. Steve Jobs. Henry Ford, let's go way back to Henry Ford. He said if we had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses. And Steve Jobs said of you know, we came up with the with the iPod and then the iPhone. And it, nobody was asking for it. And then when they came up with these bigger ones, like the one I have sitting right in front of me right now, they came up with a bigger screens and displays people were not asking for that either. And yet, in all of those cases, they became very, very popular. So as a business person, I've got to say, you, you have to what's the word cannibalize your own business, even if you have a business model and your business is doing well, if you don't compete against yourself with some new innovations, someone else is going to compete against yourself with that same innovation that you didn't bother doing. So I've got to in this case, praise Samsung for trying it. And I also agree with both you guys, I don't really want one that big. I have an iPad, if I need it, you know something that's bigger, but you know, having it in my pocket is going to be is going to be problematic. So I think that's why. So good, good on them for trying something new. But they definitely did not pull it off.

Matt 5:10
Talking to Craig Peterson our tech guru joins us at this time, every Wednesday to go over the world of technology. Craig, when I buy stuff on Amazon, I admit that I am one of the people that will you know, take like three different I actually, here's a good example, I just bought some wireless headphones, so that I could go running and not have the stupid wires in my face all the time. When I did that, I found like four or five different ones on Amazon and I checked out the reviews to see what people thought of them. And I, I will say I gave a couple extra points to the one that had better reviews. And I ended up buying it and I'm not terribly happy with it. Was I taken was was that were there a lot of phony reviews that are on these Amazon items and has this become a problem?

Craig 5:53
Well, that's a really good point because there's an article I have up on my site this week. It's from The Hustle. But this one particular was headphones, his iPhone plug it has that little iPhone connector on it. And it was ranked five stars, almost it had almost 4000 5-star reviews. And yet when the guy order did, that connector came right off broke off for like almost the first time right in his iPhone when he was trying to use it. And it's it is a real problem in something that we've kind of known about for a while. But the reason that's happening I think is very interesting. We used to have a, we still do, a lot of people here in the US who are buying stuff in China or from someplace else. They're shipping it over here. And then they are selling it on Amazon, they're reselling. And what's been happening over the last two to three years is these Chinese companies that are making these things have figured out, well, maybe we can get rid of that middleman. And so they've been shipping directly to Amazon. We're not going to get into all of the details here of how that all works. But they ship their stuff over and then they sell it. So there are some things that are going on that are kind of bad. You know, there's 82% of Americans, both all probably all three of us, right? Who checked the reviews, who checked the stars in it. But it turns out that there are sellers in China, who are paying people here in the US, they have secret Facebook groups, they have all closed Facebook groups, and they have other ways of communicating. And they will have you buy their product, they'll reimburse you for having bought it from Amazon. And then they'll give you an extra 10 bucks if you give it a five star review online. And so this guy got into this, he started poking around, he was invited to be a reviewer  of this nice little iPhone charger cable. And he found out that there is a big underbelly here there's a site you might want to check out called Fakespot, F-A-K-E-S-P-O-T. And people are looking at these five star reviews and Fakespot had a look at these. And found that in fact, there there there is star inflation going on. And they use some interesting ways to try and figure it out. But kind of on average, it's about a half a star inflation on some of these products. And when maybe as many as 30% of all of these reviews online are fake. And that is a real problem, Matt.

Matt 8:46
So I have this to blame for my wireless headphones not working the way that I want them to. Excellent.

Craig 8:50
It might be. 

Matt 8:53
I really just want to blame someone, Craig. So I'm gonna go ahead and pick this and call it good.

Craig 8:57
Call it good. When you get right down to it, read the reviews and see if they're all the same. I found reviews, I did a search online about this that said I haven't tried this product but and do a search for that. Go to Google and tell it to search Amazon for I haven't tried this product. And you will find reviews where people are giving a five star review and saying I haven't tried this product. So look for those, when you're looking at a product and then also look for people saying almost the exact same thing over and over again. And for me something that spooks me badly is very poor English. And that means that they aren't you know, they aren't people who can speak English well. So maybe they're legit. Maybe they're great people. But I get a little nervous about it.

Ken 9:53
We are down with Craig Peterson. He's our tech guru.

Matt 9:58
Peterson.

Ken 9:59
Exactly what I said. He joins us, everyone Wednesday at 7:38. Sorry for the cough.

Matt 10:06
We're now at 7:48. 10 minutes into the segment.

Ken 10:09
I didn't. I know, but he joins us at 7:38.

Matt 10:11
I'm just saying.

Ken 10:12
I didn't know the dark web, I know dark web deals with a lot of bad, you know, kiddie porn, but I didn't know it looked at my taxes.

Matt 10:23
Are you saying that you can Donald Trump's taxes on the dark web?

Ken 10:26
Yeah. Can we go down and find out? 

Craig 10:29
You will if the congressional committee catch all of them. Here's what's going on, I want to give everyone a quick piece of advice here. And that is if you have filed an extension for your taxes, file them as soon as you possibly can. Because what's happening is the bad guys are doing a couple of things. We already know they've got your passwords, we already know they've got your accounts. And we already know that most Americans are still using one of 10 passwords, people. And because of that what they've done now is the bad guys are hijacking People's Bank Accounts unbeknownst to them. So you can still use your bank account, but the bad guys have access to it. And then they are filing fake tax returns. And they're filing those big tax returns. And then they're pulling the money, all of it, including your tax return out of your bank account. And so that's how they get the guys you say well, I don't get much money. Yeah, but you're looking forward to that $500 tax refund. Well so are the bad guys. And they are paying online, anywhere from $1 for up to $52 for W-2s, 1040s, your name, your social security number and your birthdate is worth as little as 19 cents on the dark web. But just think of that. It can take you 300 hours to recover your credit and name and it's only worth 19 cents. And you can if you want to become a bad guy, you can get a how to guide to cash in on a victim's tax return for only $70 on the dark web. So it's our money, our identity isn't worth much. But if it's worth more than 17 cents to you, maybe you should change your passwords and use a password manager like 1Password or Lastpass online because man this is a real problem. And the best way to deal with this particular the taxes is to file your return early before the bad guys file one on your behalf.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

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Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

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Apr 23, 2019

Craig is on the Jim Polito Show. Today they discussed the phony 5-star reviews in Amazon. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

5-Star Phonies: Inside The Fake Amazon Review Complex

--- 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/23/2019

Inside The World Of Fake Amazon Reviews

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here. This morning, we talked about five star phonies I went into in some depth here as to how does Amazon actually work? How are these Chinese companies selling products to us? And the problem that's arisen of many of them apparently getting five star reviews posted for products that are just junk. So how can you trust it? What can you do? Well, actually, we did get to that. Yes, indeed, with Jim Polito this morning. So here we go.

Jim Polito 0:39
This is a much anticipated visit from our tech talk guru Craig Peterson, talking about something that I myself and many others rely on.You buying a product on Amazon, you look at the stars, you say why full five stars? I gotta read these reviews. Is it really that good? Well, are the reviews really true. Joining us now. Our friend Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir.

Craig 1:08
Hey, good morning, you know, if you do check those product reviews before you make a purchase, you're about equal on footing with about 82% of American adults.

Jim 1:19
Yeah, the guys, we had it, we had a chat, we had a chat about it. And we all have our own method of checking their reviews, if we're buying something that we've never bought before, like I, not if I'm buying like detergent, or, you know, something like that, if I'm buying a product I haven't bought before I've done my research. And then you know, I say well this one looks good. I read Yeah, we all have different ways of reading the reviews. But the question is, can I believe them?

Craig 1:45
Yeah, and that's a really, really good question. Because if life has changed. Everything that's changed, you know, used to be, you could trust the name brand, because you knew they didn't want to mess up all of the money they've spent on advertising. And, you know, the name brand was in it frankly, and you know, you talked about Coke, for instance, and buying all of these other things. Coke has a name brand they're trying to protect. But when you're buying on Amazon, and the seller is someone in China, or maybe someone here in the US or somewhere else in the world, there's no brand name that you can trust. Right? There's, there's nothing that you know, so yes, we do look at those stars. And there's a really good article I put up on my website, and it's from The Hustle. And it's talking about what's been happening more recently on Amazon Now, we know Amazon trying to get the prices of everything down as low as t it can so they can pass some of those savings on to consumers and, and really kind of put its competitors out of business. Even Walmart's having a hard time trying to compete with Amazon out there. So one of the things, here's how it used to work, and it's still kind of works this way, I have a couple of buddies that do this. They go online, let's say they go to Alibaba, which is a kind of, you know, big place almost like eBay for businesses over in China. They they do analysis of Amazon, what's selling, what are people looking for, and then they go to Alibaba, they find a vendor that has a good price, and hopefully a decent quality, they order a bunch of them, they check them out, and then they ship them off to Amazon. So this is how this whole thing works. Amazon has them now in their warehouses, and Amazon charges the seller, just to have the product shipped and sitting there ready to ship out. Okay. And then of course, Amazon charges when it's sold. And you know, there's money exchanging hands all of the time. And that's what's been happening for quite some time. Well, what's been happening more recently is some of these Chinese companies are sitting there saying, why are we like having a middleman in the middle of all of this. And so these people here in the states that have been kind of, you know, buying and then reselling on Amazon, they have been bypassed now, in many, many cases. So you have these Chinese companies that are just going ahead, and shipping directly to Amazon here in the US to the warehouses, and so now those Chinese companies are paying the warehouse fees are paying the Commission's, but now there's no longer the markup of that middleman, who was based in the US whose throat, you could choke if you had to, and who's verifying things? Okay. So all of this has really changed over the last two to three years in a big way. And leads us directly to the five stars you're just asking about.

Jim 4:44
And so how do I look, look? And then this isn't, this isn't doesn't have anything to do with the ethnicity of Chinese people, but you can't trust China, when it comes to a lot of this stuff. They don't.

Craig 5:00
Yeah. You're absolutely right.

Jim 5:02
I mean, think about what's been done with dog food, lead paint, all of these things that came out of China that we really can't trust them for in terms of manufacturing and businesses. So the five stars by cutting out the middleman, that five star to just be bunked.

Craig 5:21
Yeah, it could be. And in fact, that's what's been happening here. This is a little bit of an in depth research that was done. And again, you can see the articles and all the details. They've got statistics and everything else about what's been happening out there. But he's talking about one of the highest ranked iPhone chargers, and it had an almost 4000 5 star reviews, and Amazon's Choice Label on it you saying in the article, and and he goes on to do a little bit more investigation because he was able to hop into this private Facebook group and talk with us Amazon seller named Lian Xi from I'm just guessing the pronunciations here, but what is joins out China? And she said, hey, listen, if you buy something, if you buy my product, which was an iPhone charger cable, charger, if you buy my my cable, I will reimburse you for the purchase and give you a $10 commission, if you go ahead and give me a five star rating on Amazon. Now, this is this has been a problem for a while. We have these influencers looking at Kim Kardashian and others who are online, who are pouting products who are saying we are the ones to you know, to believe. And I'm wearing this mascara because it stays on all day without ruining, right? And is this an ad? Is this not an ad? Is this a paid compensation? Where does the line start and stop? And that's what the Federal Trade Commission's been trying to figure out. And now, on top of it, we apparently have these Chinese resellers who are paying people to to do this. And, man, this has been a big deal for a long time. Okay. And, and the products break almost immediately. And yet it has 4000 5 star reviews. So what are you supposed to do?

Jim 7:25
And you know, you used a good example, like a cord, an iPhone charging cord, like an aftermarket one, not one of theirs. We know if you get a cheap one, it busts in no time at all. It doesn't work. And if I see a great price, and a five star rating on Amazon, I'm going to be inclined to buy that.

Craig 7:46
Yeah, but read these things. I guess some of these are amazing. Here's another example. This is from this bodybuilding enthusiast guy named Tommy Noonan. And he's looking at these testosterone boosters on Amazon, and you noticed that a product had 580 reviews, and every single one was five stars. And then he decided he read them. And this has always been the giveaway for me. And we've talked a little bit about this before, you know the languaging that's used. And it's like the morning did the democrats and out their talking points. And every single one of them is saying the exact same thing. So that's number one. And number two is people were reading things like I haven't tried this product, but and then they leave a glowing review. So I went on Amazon and I searched actually I just went to Google and search Amazon. And I found tons of reviews just like this. I never use this product but.

Jim 8:44
So what you do is, yeah, and I've done that to see, I've done it before, to see if someone has lifted what they've written from somebody else. And I just cut and paste and drop it in Google and you see it comes up somewhere else. So you say you cut and paste that review, put it in there, and it pops up in a million different locations. Identical wording.

Craig 9:09
Yeah, exactly. And it's, it's easy enough just to look and see even within one product, or most of these almost exactly the same wording. And now it's gotten even easier, Amazon has something else called Mechanical Turk. And Mechanical Turk is designed, it's fantastic for businesses, if you have something that needs to be done by someone. And it's a very repetitive task. And maybe you want to pay a cent or five cents to find me a picture of a kitty cat with this or that. That's what Mechanical Turk is all about. And with Mechanical Turk, you can even though this is against the policies, okay? But you can even have people post things, find things put things up. So all of this huge, beautiful infrastructure that's out there on the internet is being misused, and they're able to help thousands of people. You can have immediately, I could have 5000 followers for your Facebook page tomorrow, if you're willing to pay 100 bucks. And the same thing's true with Amazon reviews now I'm afraid.

Jim 10:12
Well Craig, this has been great information very helpful to people, because so many of us who are shopping there. Now, folks, this information more in depth plus other information, plus when there's a big hack. You want to be on Craig's list, you want to be one of the people who's able to get a text from him and get this information. So here's what you do. You text my name, Jim to this number.

Craig 10:46
855-385-5553. That's 855-385-5553.

Jim 10:56
Standard data and text rates apply. And he will not bother you. He will not sell your name to somebody else. Craig, always a pleasure. But especially today, this was great information.

Craig 11:09
Hey, thanks, Jim. Take care.

Jim 11:11
Take care. All right, when we return a final word.

Craig 11:15
I guess the bottom line here is things aren't always as they appear to be. I do spend some time with the reviews myself. And obviously I think everybody should nowadays. And what I didn't mention with Jim is that Amazon has a lot they could do in order to stop this from happening. But is it really in their best interest? I think ultimately it is. And they have been cracking down a little bit but I think there's still a lot more Amazon could do to become a trusted place to buy online. All right, Take care everybody. Have a great day. We'll be back tomorrow. Bye bye. 

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Apr 22, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath as they discussed presidential candidate Representative Delaney's plans to make some cyber changes in the government. They also discussed how much your tax information is worth in the dark web.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Here’s How Much Your Tax Info Is Worth On The Dark Web
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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/22/2019

Rep Delaney Cybersecurity Cabinet Position - What Your Tax Info Is Worth

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey everybody. Good morning, Craig Peterson here with another busy week I had. I was on this morning with Mr. Jack Heath and we talked a little bit about two things and I gotta say here I'm, I'm, I wish I had more time with him. A little disappointed. But we talked about Delaney, who's running for president right now, representative Delaney wants to make some major cyber changes to the federal government. And then we also talked a little bit about the scammers that are out there right now with your tax info and stuff. And I really wanted to give you some more information, but he kind of cut me off but it's his radio show. I shouldn't have any complaints. Anyways. Here we go with Mr. Heath and a bit of a surprise to I think about exactly what Delaney's trying to do.

Jack Heath 0:51
Craig Peterson, our tech talk guy. His show airs on weekends. Tech Talk on our iHeart News talk network. He joins us in the auto fair listener lines. Good morning, Mr. Craig.

Craig 0:59
Hey good morning, Jack. Interesting, you're talking about Delaney here who is running, of course, for the presidential slot and what's been happening with our US Cyber Command, because there is a lot going on right now. As you know, there are brightened held somewhere around 2 million open jobs in cyber security. And in the federal government, it's really scattered across a number of different agencies. And President Trump eliminated the position of what was called a cyber security coordinator, or maybe cyber security is our and what's happening with Delaney is he is looking to try and make a federal agency that everything comes underneath. And I get concerned when I see that sort of thing, Jack, because it's, it's difficult enough for businesses that can move quickly, that can respond quickly to be able to handle cyber security. But when you're talking about the federal government, that is a slow as molasses at best, I start getting kind of concerned. But I can see his point trying to pull it all together have a more holistic approach, and maybe having a cabinet level agency to focus on protecting cyberspace isn't a bad thing.

Jack 2:13
Well, I imagine, you know, you look at the future. And in fact, it was a story I thought of you early early early this morning Craig that one of the concerns with Russia right now. Is they either as a government or their intelligence folks are working with more cyber criminals right now.

Craig 2:33
Yeah, I read that as well.

Jack 2:33
That's not very encouraging. I mean, you know, it's not going to go away. I mean, you know as everything grows online  commerce, retail information, the appetite for those who want to take advantage of others. It's just, it's just a bigger bonanza, bigger pool, right?

Craig 2:48
Well, it is. And remember what caused the fall of the Soviet Union, ultimately, it was the spending, and they could not keep up with us in the spending race when it came to military, right? There is nothing cheaper for a government in a country than cyber attacks compared to of course, building tanks and trying to hire people and everything else. With a small team in North Korea has already demonstrated this was a small team of just a few hundred people maximum, you can cause incredible damage. And I saw that same article and what's happening over there with Russia and, and partnering with some of these criminals. It concerns me to no end. And we just had evidence come out a few weeks ago, that there again, have been attacks against some of our major pieces of infrastructure. It didn't really hit the news very much. I saw it in some of my internal security bulletins. But it's happening, it's growing. And I have to say, I don't disagree at all, with Representative Delaney, that we do need something at the top of the Federal infrastructure to protect our federal network. But how far does this go? And what kind of controls are they going to put in place? And what sort of responsibilities are they going to expect businesses to have with all of this? There's a lot of questions to answer still.

Jack 4:12
All right, any other consumer tips or observations on this Monday?

Craig 4:16
Well, hey, if you haven't found your tax reports, yet, your taxes, there is, of course, a concerted effort still going on by the bad guys. And what they'll do is they've already got your information in many cases. They'll file a W-2, they'll file 1040s. They've really gotten kind of crazy here. And they're trying to get your tax return into your bank account, and then pull the money out. So your W-2 or a 1040 is only worth between about $1 for right now on the black market and maybe 20 bucks. So. 

Jack 4:52
Yeah. Thanks. Great stuff Craig. Great, great stuff. And you know, some of the scammers out there, if you'd just get a little more conditioned to to be thinking cynically, you can pick up on it, but your email, for example, you might get an email. And they'll go after the biggest financial names. This is how simple and clever they are, for example, like the biggest bank name you've heard of, or big financial name, like Chase, or Wells Fargo, some household name. And they'll send you something like to Erin Boss, they'll say you know, an email to you Erin. Somehow they get your personal email. This very look, very official looking bank thing saying they just need to verify your Wells Fargo account or Chase, then you might think, or DC, you might think I don't really have something with oh, wait a minute, my car payment might be leased to them. So people go online, and they click verify the account. And they want you to give your account information and then pretend to tell you something where your account's at risk. The whole thing's a scam. The whole thing's a scam.

Craig 5:54
And I got something for the listeners Jack, don't let me go quick. Yeah, Google put together a really good little website that you can use that allows you to see how they are doing it. Gives you real emails, lets you look at them and determine whether or not things are false.

Jack 6:12 
I got one. And I took it to my bank because it looked so official. I go, oh my goodness, our logo, that a lot of times, you gotta look at the return website.

Unknown 6:20
And it's not the actual institution. But again, the worst thing that can happen is you ignore these things do nothing. And if it's legit, you're going to get a call. But you know, it's exactly the other thing is if you're trying to sell something online, like you go to one of these sites like say, Erin, you're trying to sell some clothing or you're trying to sell a piece of furniture. They even try and get you there. They all just set that and then start contacting you and say, well, we want you you know, we want this but in order for us to buy it, we need you to send us this and you're like no, no, no, that's not how it works. All right Craig make it a good one. Next Monday. Make it a good Monday Craig thank you very much Craig Peterson. Craig Peterson with an O-N.com.

Craig 6:54
Hey, I gotta add this in here. In case you did not get this before, previously, what I was trying to get across to Jack was there is a phishing quiz online that Google's provided. And the URL for that is http://phishingquizwithGoogle.com. That's spelled P-H-I-S-H-I-N-G-Q-U-I-Z. You already know how to spell phishing, right? But it's phishingquiz one word, dot with Google. One word, W-I-T-H-G-O-O-G-L-E.com. PhishingquizwithGoogle com. There are two dots here. There's only one in front of com. Anyways, take it, look at it. Have your friends and relatives look at it. Have everybody inside your business organization look at it. It is very, very helpful. Of course, yours truly got 100% on it. But a lot of people I've pointed to it have gotten seven or eight right. 70 or 80%. So you know, I guess that's normal. So if you don't get a great mark on it a great score. Don't feel so bad because the this technology really is kind of confusing. There's so many things going on. You just don't know what to do what to trust, just like Jack talked about with his own bank. Anyways, have a great day. We'll be back tomorrow with Mr. Polito. Bye bye

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Apr 19, 2019

Did you upgrade your Router?  If not you probably have been hacked by hacker groups have been hijacking DNS traffic on D-Link routers for months and I will get into that more today.

Yet again, Facebook is in the news and again it is for their privacy and their cameras so i will discuss the implications of this.

April 15 -- the date that looms over all of us each year. Have you considered the value of your Tax information to a criminal?  Today we will cover more on this and how you can protect yourself.

The person who started this whole Walking Dead series has a brand new series that's coming out and she has some creepy thoughts about technology.  More on this

Updates are important.  Guess who found out the hard way -- Yes that would be NYC IT.  Failure to update their systems brought the New York City wireless network down. So let's get right into it here.

For all this and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/20/2019

Home And Small Business Routers Hacked - NYC Wireless Down Due To Lack Of Updates - Fake Amazon Reviews Critical - Amazon Show The Feed Walking Dead Channing Powell

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, everybody. We are getting going here. Of course, Craig Peterson. We're going to talk about some of the major tech stories. This week, we're going to talk about the hacker groups been hijacking DNS traffic on D-Link routers for months. Now, what does that mean to you? What can you do about it? How can you detect it? Facebook, the privacy kings, right? What's happening with Facebook and their really creepy portal? Yeah, it's kind of interesting, that little camera they have. Tax info, of course, April 15, time to file the personal taxes. What is happening? What's the cost? What's the value of your tax information online and why would they steal it? The founder, the person who started this whole Walking Dead series has a brand new series that's coming out. And she's got some creepy things to say about technology. And we've got the New York City wireless network down, I warned you. Don't say I didn't warn you guys about that and what's happening. So let's get right into it here.

Craig 1:12
DNS has, of course, been one of the most important parts of our internet for very, very long time. Time was we had to maintain hosts tables, we had to know where everybody was, we had to do hop routing, we'd send it to somebody that knew more, they had a bigger map of the internet. So you know, we had upstream providers and we would send it to them, we were all connected together. And it was really quite a hodgepodge. So DNS came out. And the idea behind DNS isa dynamic name system was to allow us now to have one massive name database. Now it was designed in the times when the internet was a much more friendly place. We didn't have bad guys out there running around, we didn't have opposition parties who are trying to shut us down, denial of service attacks and and hijacking domains. Well, actually, we kind of did have hijacking domains. Had a couple stolen from me back in the day, but it was a much more genteel place. And DNS was designed for a cooperative system. So if you want to go to Google com, or http://CraigPeterson.com or anywhere online, you could use the name, it would go to this DNS system, who would then look up that name, it would come back with an Internet address, and then that address would be used to route your data. Does that make sense to you? I, you know, I hopefully I explained that right. And simply enough. The idea is that we can using DNS just use names because as humans aren't great at remembering all of these multi multi digit numbers. And it's gotten even worse now with IPV6, but we're not going to get into that right now. So what's been happening with our wonderful little hacker group here, while the modems here from D-Link, ARG, DS-LINK, SECUTECH, and TOTOLINK, and you can see them here on my screen. You'll find them on my website, just go to http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. And you can watch along here, but for the last few months, they've really been hacking a lot, I have the list of known routers that have this vulnerability that had been hacked. And this is based on a one of the security companies that went and had up, poke around, Troy Mercer's, the guy's name, Bad Packets, his name of the company. And he's saying there were three major waves, there is a wave, late December, early February, late March as well, in 2019. But these attacks are still going on, these hacks are still out there. And what they're doing is they're taking the DNS information that you would normally have in your router, and they are changing it to some of these malicious DNS servers. Now, I've got it up on my screen, I just pulled it up from this article, which you will also find on ZDNet, which is when we're talking about or right there and http://CraigPeterson.com, that's probably the easiest way to find it. And I send it out today in my show notes as well, my show notes email, but these are the addresses. So if you want to check right now to see if your router has been compromised, have a look for these addresses in your DNS settings. And the idea here is they change the settings on your router, it now provides those DNS addresses to your other equipment in your home or your office. So now when your other equipment tries to go somewhere online, they have the ability to intercept it, because they just say hey, yeah, Google isn't at 123 Main Street in Merrimack. No, no, no, it's at 1745 Lenin street in Moscow, and some how now your traffic in some going to Moscow? Well, in this case, right? This kind of looks like it's some Brazilian people. They're really trying to do this the most. But they've hijacked traffic that's been meant for Netflix, Google, PayPal, and some Brazilian banks. So the idea here is you try and go to one of these sites. And what do they require you to do? They require you to log in. Or maybe there's a cookie set in your browser that they can read and use to login. So they try and get you to login, get the information from you. And then now they've got your information, we already discussed why they want it. And we'll get into in just a couple more minutes too when we're talking about what's happening right now with your tax information. But they are using what are called bulletproof hosting providers, in case you're not familiar with that is these bulletproof hosting providers. And I'm going to stick their ASs here, up on the screen. If you're a total geek, you will find right there. There we go.

Craig 6:01
There's AS's which are autonomous systems, part of the internet backbone. But bulletproof hosting providers will not provide information about their clients to law enforcement. And they try and prevent anybody from figuring out who their customers are. So these two hosting providers of the guys that are doing it, this has all happened before, there's a massive, malvertising operation. Sometimes they'll use these DNS attacks, in order to inject into the stream ads. We've had ISPs, legit ones here in the US who've been doing similar things. If you try and go to a site that doesn't have a DNS entry, guess what they're going to do?

Craig 6:44
Yeah, they're going to send you to their site to their advertising.

Craig 6:49
So that's what's been going on. If you are using any one of these routers button up on the screen, again, which are basically the D-Links, ARG, DS-LINK, SECUTECH, and TOTOLINK, as well as many others. Make sure you update them, upgrading them or replace them. And I went over this in quite a bit of detail in my most recent master course, about what is happening out there and what you need to be aware of. All right.

Craig 7:21
So let's move on to our next article. This is something I warned everybody about last year. And then again, I warned everybody about just about a month ago. And as it turns out our friends at New York City, they kind of knew about it, too, but they didn't really do anything about it. And that is this New York City wireless network. And it is down due to a bug at least it has been down. They've been working on trying to get this thing back up online, which makes sense, right?

Craig 7:58
And this has to do with failure to update. How many times have we talked about that being a real problem out there. And the failure to update in this case is all of our wonderful data that they're using to allow the police, fire departments and others to communicate. Now, the fire department is saying they got off of what's called NYC WIN which is their wide area internet. They got off of it a couple of years ago, they switched over to Verizon mobile data. And they're using that in order to communicate with the hospitals when they're transporting patients and things. But the transit officials can't remotely control 12,000 plus traffic lights, traffic cameras, NYPD license plate readers are down. This is according to the New York Post. It crashed on Saturday, April 6. Do you remember that date?

Craig 8:55
Yeah, I warned everybody, right. Remember that one guy quoted him saying I am not going to be anywhere near an airplane on April 6th? Well, the the Department of it there New York City is paying Northrop Grumman about $40 million a year to run this network that cost them a half a billion to put in place and has been in service in for 10 years. And they never updated some of the core components. Why would you use GPS? Here's what's happening.

Craig 9:28
The GPS, older GPS equipment had what's called a rollover event. They were using Okay, there's a little geeky but 32 bit counters, you remember the old 32 bit computers and you got upgrade you want 64 bit Windows and 32 bit Windows. Remember all that thing, while these older GPS units had 32 bit counters in them. And what that meant is come April 6th, they went from it's 5pm on April 5th to it's zero pm. It rolls back to zero, which goes back to the Epic, which I'm not sure what it wasn't GPS, and the Unix world it was 1970. But everything got messed up. So now all of a sudden, their traffic cameras, security cameras are all saying that they are down for maintenance because they are down and they're down hard. The same thing with license plate readers, not all of them, but the ones that were older, all are failing on them now. But they use GPS for the clocks. Now think about gridlock. Gridlock is a term that was invented in the city of New York. And what it meant was they have this grid laid out, right, it's all beautiful grid straight lines. And gridlocked meant that traffic couldn't move, because the lights weren't properly synchronized. And it was there for decades. And they they came up with that term. So they decided they had to synchronize all of the light so that traffic could flow properly. Well, traffic isn't flowing properly, because now the clocks that are in the light, the traffic lights that were using a clock coming from the satellites via the GPS signal. That GPS receivers not working, the clocks are now falling out of sync. Some of them I suspect pretty quickly falling out of sync. So now New York's in for more gridlock, hopefully, they'll get this fixed pretty quickly. But it's a very, very big deal. Police have been sent to spots with vehicle mounted readers where the readers are failing. And I kind of find that interesting, too, because you're talking about license plate readers really, that's a critical piece of infrastructure. I guess it is if you're trying to find people who owe money on parking tickets, but otherwise, and fire department and you New York with a patient care reports to hospitals, they've got that all fixed. They're saying they're all set and according to New York Post Northrop Grumman declined to comment is, is that a shocker? Is that a shocker to you as well?

Craig 12:09
Yeah, of course, they're not going to comment on that sort of thing. Alright, so next up here, let's go to our fake Amazon reviews stories. This is just crazy here. Have you gone to Amazon? Have you used some of their review stuff? I know I have. And it's, it's you know, it's very handy. And I use it quite a bit, right. And that's kind of the stars that are that are on top of the page, and they put this up on the screen for you.

Craig 12:42
And a five star reviews, can you trust them? Well this particular reporter from the Hustle, went underground and spent two weeks there and found out what was really happening. So gives a, actually, I'm not even sure what the name of the author of this article is. They don't mention their name, and they don't have credit. Okay, maybe it's Zachary Crockett, that might be it.

Craig 13:11
So, here's what he said. He said he went to this private Facebook group, this underground Facebook group, and was chatting with this person named Lien Xi, an Amazon seller from Guangzhou China. And she offered him a deal. If he gave her a five star review. For her iPhone charger. Now he would need to buy the charger from Amazon. So that could be a verified purchase. And then what she would do is she would refund him via PayPal and pay him a $10 commission. So he was asking, Hey, isn't this illegal? And her response was? Well, that she didn't say no. She said what you will love is all she said right? So he looked up or product review. And you can see this on my screen here http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. 

Craig 14:09
But he found her iPhone charger on Amazon. And it had almost 4000 5-star reviews.

Craig 14:19
Isn't that just amazing?

Craig 14:21
Also got Amazon's Choice Label, which is very, very valuable. I know I use that. So when I'm looking on something on Amazon, I'm looking at the stars. And I'm looking at the Amazon's choice on the little black box that comes up. And then occasionally, depending on the price of the item, I'll scroll down to read the reviews. Well, apparently I'm not alone. And if you do the same thing, you're not alone, either. Because what it's saying here is 65% of us trust online reviews. 82% of American adults check the product reviews before making a purchase. I think that's low frankly, I think it's almost 100%. If you're an Amazon, right, it's probably 100%. But just generally shopping online is probably more like 82 I can see that.

Craig 15:11
So research is showing that we're more swayed by a simple star rating than what the reviewers actually write. And I've got to also go Let me see pop hit head a little bit here. Some of these reviews and you might have seen stuff like this. I know I have. And it really upset me. You see reviews and he's saying this one product is looking at. this is another guy this guy named Tommy Noonan had 580 reviews, and every single one of them was five stars. But he recalls people would write things like I haven't tried this product but and then leave a glowing review. Well, does that smell like it's a setup, or what? It definitely does. Let me show you this here. Okay, on the screen again, http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. Facebook reviews are boosting a lot of products. And I've seen stats saying it's 20% all the way up to 60% of these are fake. But look at this, headphones, it saying the fake reviews, the average star rating is 4.89 out of five. And the real reviews are 3.99. So that's a difference for headphones. I'm almost a whole star.

Craig 16:28
Isn't that amazing? So it's showing up as five stars almost when it should be four stars. Then what happened is there's a guy out there who's doing some research. Fakespot is where you'll find it. Fakespot.com. And they came up with some of these stats. And they are absolutely shocking. When you get right down to it here I'm going to bring this up. So it's my absolute full desktop view here. So you can see this whole thing and in more detail. But there it is, right headphones, cell phone accessories, pest control, car control, sexual wellness, pet supplies, all of these things, vitamins and supplements, by the way, kind of the bottom of the list. They they only have a differential between fake and real stars of the quarter star here, bottom line. And then there's another one I want to show you here too. This is the search on unreliable Amazon reviews. This is a chart again, that I've got up on, you'll see it on YouTube. But they are hosting, Amazon's hosting 1.8 million vendors and sellers who are selling nearly 600 million items that are generating about 9.6 million new product reviews every month. So really the the big deal here, the big question is, how can you tell when they are fake? How can Amazon tell? If you're talking about 10 million reviews a month, how can they tell? Well, there's some ways to do it. They're kind of trying to do it. But I've got to say I think they have a negative motivation in trying to do it. I'm not sure it's all it's cracked up to be. Because by having these people shipping products directly from China to Amazon's warehouses in bulk. So they ship 10,000, 100,000 of these things to Amazon warehouses, Amazon, then prepositions them in warehouses close to where they think there will be people that will be buying them. And then those people who are looking to buy them can get them very quickly, right? That's the whole idea behind it.

Craig 18:38
Well, you're cutting out the middleman, instead of having somebody buy it from China, ship it to the US and then ship them in with smaller quantity used to Amazon, the Chinese manufacturers effectively are shipping it right to Amazon, who ships that right to you. So that's saving you a lot of money, which I would prefer recently called a disincentive. Right? I don't think Amazon's purposely trying to be, you know, hiding things from us. But be very careful out there. Because there's been a huge rush in the marketplace, there are dozens of products that are almost indistinguishable from each other. And frankly, that's exactly what what they're taking advantage of right now. With these fake reviews, how do they get their product well known while they just make themselves a fake little review, right? That makes it easy enough.

Craig 19:30
So let me pull up our next little article. And this is fascinating. And I am totally looking forward to seeing this when it comes out. And this is from Yahoo, and right now they just had a film festival over in Cannes over in southern France. And Channing Powell, you might have heard that name before. She's the lady who founded, who started Walking Dead. And she's been thinking about what's happening with technology now and what's happening with technology in the future. And this is an article from Yahoo News that they picked up from AFP Wire. But she says she is terrified of what big tech might be up to. She has a new show called The Feed. And it's premiering in Cannes. And that's the just this week, by the way. And my birthday, by the way this week as well. It's premiering and Cannes this week, and it's all about a dystopian future now who hasn't heard about dystopian futures? Right? That's it's all normal. Well, what she's saying is Elon Musk, and Facebook are both trying to develop technology that can allow you to remotely control things. But The Feed, this new Amazon series goes a step further. Not only can you control things with your mind, but people you can send your feelings, what you're seeing, what you're smelling, everything you can send it to someone else in social media. So someone else can live your life. Well, what happens if someone's in the middle of that, a company, like a Facebook or whomever. And let's say they're malicious, and they modify that, or they they play with your mind and your emotions, because now they can send emotions to you. And the cells, the smells, and the the eyesight, everything to make it seem real well, that's what this is all about. And she says that Elon Musk right now is developing a neural lace computer that covers the entire brain that you would control with thought, okay. She also goes in and talks about what's been happening at MIT, they have something that clips on your ear, and will do some remote control stuff for you. She's saying she's 39 years old, by the way, so she's not quite a millennial. But she's very concerned, you know, we got our iPhones with us all the time, and people just can't leave them behind. They're checking Instagram constantly. So what's going to end up happening here? There's some companies already in Belgium, in Sweden that are implanting chips into people. When here's a direct quote from here to that I totally agree with, when somebody like Elon Musk, who's a radical libertarian, who's inside all of this development and understanding of it. When someone like Elon Musk is telling government that you need to regulate us and stop us from doing what we are doing, that is absolutely terrifying, absolutely terrifying. And frankly, we're at a tipping point now. The Chinese government has already started a social credit score, where they will now we reward you or punish you, based on social credit that starts January 1, 2020.

Craig 23:10
That's the tipping point. I talked last week on my show about what has happened in Venezuela, they have purchased the Chinese social credit system, where now you have a national ID card that you sir, everything from banking through voting, they know how you voted, they know where your money's coming from. And if you're getting any money from the government, they can, will and do control it. So maybe we're already past the tipping point, she doesn't say that she says, you know, we're really close. But maybe we are already passed it. And and frankly, that's scary. That really scares me the bottom line.

Craig 23:49
Alright, so we've got a couple more articles. And we've only got a couple more minutes. So let's get to those pretty quickly here.

Craig 23:57
Let's get that up on my screen. And I'm going to let's see. So let's talk about this really quick. And this has to do with your taxes. You have of course been paying taxes for years, right? Just one of the two things that that is certain than life, death and taxes. So this is an article from Fox Business and I got it up on my screen, YouTube or excuse me http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. But we have our taxes out there. IRS is said to have the largest database in the world. And that doesn't surprise me. But here's how much it's worth. We filed W2s and 1040s. There's the business stuff that's out there. They are all available for purchase online. And you've heard these tips before use multi-factor authentication with your bank, right? Use a password manager, don't say passwords in your browser, file your taxes as soon as possible. So that with the bad guys file of false tax reporting your name, it's not going it's going to pop up a flag it's not going to go through. Don't give away personal information as you have to never transfer money based on an email, right? All the basic stuff. Well, here's how much your information is worth. I'm going to pull us up on the screen. Here we go right now. So basically, for $1,000, a hacker can purchase access to a US based bank account, file a fake return, claim the IRS refund and cash out through cryptocurrency exchange. And they will make more not 100% return on their thousand dollar investment. That's the bottom line here. So they're really are trying to do it. IRS is saying that there's 1.4 billion breach attempts every year, many of them are coming from nation states, which frankly, doesn't surprise me in the least. Why not? It's a good way to fund your operations when you get right down to it.

Craig 26:05
And then we got one more article really quickly here. I couldn't believe it when our friends over at Facebook decided that they would go ahead, I just couldn't believe this, that they would go ahead and release a nice little creepy device.

Craig 26:27
This is the Portal Have you heard about their Portal before? This is a device they were selling for 200 bucks and it had in at some pretty darn neat technology. And this technologies designed to be able to recognize faces in the room, follow faces. And you could call out to your family and friends you know really cool stuff that an article by our friends over at Boeing Boeing. Well, the bottom line is who wants to buy a telescreen from Facebook? Nobody trusts them. They were selling it six months ago for 200 bucks. Apparently, it hasn't been selling very well. And as part of Facebook's apology tour they've been doing for the last year, they dropped the price. So if you want Facebook to spy on you in your home, and track you and your face as you walk around the room, which is nice if you're cooking dinner and you're talking with someone and it's creepy if you're not, then go ahead for 99 bucks, you can get it right now as well. So that's it for today. Have a great week. We are putting these up online as well. You can see them at http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube for all of the YouTube people who want to follow it and we're putting our security tips up there and other things as well. So it should be a good time for all. Keep an eye out and please do subscribe. Follow me over there http://CraigPeterson.com/YouTube. And I will be back next week right here. And I'll be here with Jack Heath on Monday morning and Jim Polito on Tuesday morning and an even more throughout the week. So keep an eye on my podcast and that's at http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. Take care everybody. Have a great week ahead. Bye bye. 

--- 

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---

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Apr 17, 2019

Are we living in a virtual world? Is Amazon spying on us? Is your car watching you? Find out more as Craig discusses these topics with Ken and Matt on the WGAN Morning News this Wednesday morning.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Amazon Workers Are Listening To What You Tell Alexa

Are We Living In A Simulation? This Mit Scientist Says It’s More Likely Than Not

Your Car Is Watching You. Who Owns The Data?
---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/17/2019

Our Virtual world - Data Cars Are Collecting - The Truth About Amazon Alexa Monitoring

Craig Peterson  0:00 
Good morning, everybody. I expect I'll be doing a couple of It's a Security Thing podcasts this week. So make sure you check back. Today I was on with Ken and Matt. And we reviewed of course the articles in the news this week we talked about the cars and the amount of data they are collecting on us right now. We spent a little bit of time talking about this whole what's happening with virtual reality thing and, you know, a couple of other topics came up as well. So here we go with Ken and Matt.

Matt Gagnon 0:34
Alright, here we go. It is 7:38 on the WGAN Morning News on Wednesday morning. And Craig Peterson joins us as he typically does on this day to go over what's happening in the world of technology Craig Peterson. Welcome to the program, sir.

Craig 0:46
Hey, he does you know, I remember back in the, must have been 74, 75 driving down the Decarie expressway in Montreal and having the axle in our car come out the side rear axle. And it was hanging out about two and a half three feet almost ready to completely come out. So we didn't just almost lose a tire or lose a tire. We almost lost the whole wheel and the actual want to happen to be actual came out of our car. That would, let me tell you that was quite a quite an event because the Decarie expressway was was a very busy back then in the mid 70s.

Ken Altshuler 1:28
How did the wheel on the other side stay on if your axle came out that far?

Craig 1:34
What is the differential in the rear right, rear wheel drive car. So there's really two axles and so the one on the left side somehow the bearing went and became detached from the differential and slid it out. Man, that'll wake you up.

Ken 1:51
Yes, it will. Speaking of waking up, Craig Peterson. I thought that Alexa, can't listen to what's going on in your house?

Craig 2:02
Yeah, you know, there's been a lot of bad reporting on this. And you know, other than us right here, I think most stations tend to report things incorrectly. Knee jerk. Let me put it that way.

Matt 2:15  
Are you calling people a fake news?

Craig 2:16 
Fake news? Yeah, exactly. It's been all over the place just last week. So I'm not surprised you kind of caught up top this one Ken. But here's what they're saying. They're saying they're complaining that the Alexa is listening to you. And worse than than Amazon's people are listening to you. Here's the bottom line on this. And here's what's really happening. If you develop some software, you have to test it. And one of the things I never worked on was voice recognition software. I worked on signature recognition analysis, but never voice. Always a very difficult thing to do. And frankly, I am shocked and amazed how good voice recognition has become. Well, it's become really good. Not because somehow computers have gotten smarter or faster, that has nothing really to do with it. voice recognition has gotten really good because people are analyzing what the computers are doing. So you, you know, breaks down the speech and tries to understand you. And you have to have a human come in afterwards, make sure that computer did it correctly. Maybe you flag something that you want people to listen to, because the person just kept asking basically the same thing and the computer couldn't recognize it. So what's going on here right now is Amazon has a team, a worldwide team, a global team. And they examine a small portion of the recordings that the Alexa has made of your commands. So Matt, for instance, how would you tell an Amazon device to tune in to the radio station this morning?

Matt 4:02
Alexa, tune in to WGAN.

Craig 4:07 
Exactly. And so now Alexa is going to tune in and you have a great radio announcer voice.

Ken 4:14 
He does.

Matt 4:14
Thank you, I appreciate that.

Ken 4:15
Nobody says that to me clearly.

Craig 4:18
So it would pick it up and it would handle it pretty darn well. But a lot of us kind of mumble and you know, our accents are there from other languages we might speak and things. So the Amazon Alexa, the workers are not sitting there listening to all of your conversations. What's happening is a very small percentage of commands just like Matt gave, are analyzed by humans to make sure it's doing the right things. And then they use that to tune up the Alexa to be able to appropriately answer questions or obey commands. Google does it with their Google Home systems, Siri does it. Apple does it with their systems, and the workers don't have your name, your email address. They don't know who you are. They have nothing personally identifiable about you. All they're trying to do is make the speech recognition better. And they also if they hear something that might be considered suspicious, they do nothing with it, because they have no context. So people have been worried about that, too. And I can tell you, and you know, as an emergency medical professional for 10 years, I was a mandated reporter. And we had to report things that we thought were suspicious. Well, different people have different levels of suspicion. And we saw that in Blue Bloods, I love Blue Bloods on TV here this last week, where you have a woman who is there in a park and doesn't like the way another mother is talking to her and teasing her about this other mother's baby and stuff. So she reports it to the police and everything. So there's different levels of suspicion. And all you're hearing, when you're examining this, when this team is listening to the audio, is a 10 second snippet, a maximum of 30 seconds that you can't really tell what's going on. So don't worry about it. Yeah, they have it. Yeah, they're keeping it Yeah, they're analyzing it. But it bottom line, the best of my knowledge, even though it's been called up as evidence in some court cases, it's never actually been particularly valuable, other than in divorce cases.

Matt 6:32
All right, we're talking to Craig Peterson. He is our tech guru. He joins us on Wednesdays at this time to go over what's happening in the world of technology. And Craig, I rewatched The Matrix the other day. And I remember 1999, when that came out, which is now 20 years ago, my god in heaven, that it sparked a number of conversations between college philosophy majors about whether or not it was something that would show us that we actually did already live inside a simulation and whether or not The Matrix was real, and the movie was kind of showing us that reality, and so on and so forth. But this conversation is rearing its ugly head yet again, because there's an argument being made right now that we are, in fact, living in a simulation. So Craig, I guess my question to you is, am I currently plugged into a computer somewhere living my life as a simulation?

Craig 7:17
Yeah, it's a real interesting question. Oh, my gosh, I got into this in some detail on my podcast, too, because this is something that's fascinated me for at least 25 years before it came out, The Matrix came out. Do you remember the same time? Do you remember two more movies that came out in 98, 99? The 13th Floor and Dark City?

Matt 7:38  
I remember both of those movies.

Craig 7:40
Yeah. All kind of the same thing. Well, here's the bottom line on all this. I'll make this pretty quick. We could go on for hours. But the basic thinking is, we have virtual reality right now. I'm sure Ken uses it every day as he's playing his video games, right. And it's getting better and better as we go forward. At some point, this is going to be better than, well, it's much better than today. But it's going to be as good as the real world you won't be able to distinguish the real world from not it was even in the fifth, The 5th Day, right? Or The 6th Day. What was that Schwarzenegger movie?

Matt 8:22
I think it was the 6th Day wasn't it?

Craig 8:24 
6th Day.

Matt 8:26 
And I remember when we're talking about. Yeah. Not a lot of people remember that Arnold Schwarzenegger movie,

Craig 8:28
Well, the guy had a virtual girlfriend.

Matt 8:30 
Correct.

Craig 8:30 
So it gets to that point. And our computers are fast enough to be able to simulate people just like they did in these movies, then what's to say that some history major doesn't create a program that spins up a society from 500, a thousand years ago, and lets the program run. Lets things happen within the program, to try and see how people might have acted a thousand years ago, or changing things just a little bit here or there. What would happen? Well, if any of that is possible, and it is all possible, there's no question and then it'll be extremely possible in another, certainly within 50 years, some people are saying 20 or 30 years, then what are the odds that what we are experiencing is real? And in other words, if there was one society that went all the way past where we're at to indistinguishable virtual reality, to be able to create virtual reality, civilizations, what are the odds that we are that initial civilization, and not one of millions of likely virtual civilizations in the future? And so this is from an MIT science as he just came out with a book called The simulation hypothesis. There are quite a few books out about the same topic, but I love that, that title. And he is a computer scientist, Video game developer. He leads the Playlabs at MIT. And I'm assuming it's a he. Yeah, it is a he. Rizwan Virk. R-I-Z-W-A-N Virk. So if he's right, what does it mean to us? Does it matter? You know, does it all of a sudden change our lives in any way? They the answer's no. It's very interesting to think about that though, I agree with you Matt.

Ken 10:28
We are talking to our tech guru, Craig Peterson, who joins us every week at this time. 7:30 every Wednesdays. And you can go to http://CraigPeterson.com and get all this news all the time. Before we let you go, are you telling me now that my cars watching what I'm doing? I mean, I have no privacy in my car?

Craig 10:47  
None whatsoever.

Matt 10:49
You don't have any privacy anywhere Ken. 

Unknown 10:51
I guess so.

Matt 10:52
This is America in 2019.

Craig 10:54
Well, you know, when you're really good looking Matt, everyone's watching.

Ken 10:54
Exactly, really?

Craig 10:55 
Yeah. Yeah, I've heard that anyways. Well, I didn't realize this statistic. But cars now are capable, because really, it's just a computer on wheels. In fact, that's not even true. It is 20 to 30, at least computers on wheels in your car. And it can generate about 25 gigabytes of data every hour. Four terabytes a day. And they're saying that in another 10 years, that data from our cars is going to be worth almost a trillion dollars. So the big question out there right now is who owns that data from our cars and and how private is it going to be? Because when we take our cars, and even now, they are plugged into a network and able for instance, with Mercedes, they have engineers in Germany, that examine the data in your car to try and figure out if there's any issues, things you might not be aware of. Acura is doing some of those same things, many high end car brands are doing it and even lower end car brand are set up right now to plug your car into their computers, collect data and do some analysis. So who owns it? How private should it be? Could it be at this point in Europe, they have some laws that that aren't specifically about this, but the GDPR does kind of cover it. California has a lot that goes into effect next year. And that law is going to try and keep this private information private. But as much as 10 years ago, I know speaking of Decarie expressway in Montreal, I know in Montreal on Sherbrooke, they pulled a car over because people had reported it as speeding. The police didn't see it speed, but they pulled it over. They plugged a reader into that port in your car. And it reported that the car had within the last 10 minutes been doing 70 miles an hour on a city street and they issued a  ticket. So things to think about and maybe look forward to hear guys.

Matt 13:06 
All right. Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins us at this time every Wednesday. Appreciate it Craig as always. And we will talk to you again next week, sir.

Craig 13:15
Take care, guys. Bye Bye.

Ken 13:16
Thanks, Craig.

Craig 13:24
And I'll be back tomorrow. Take care guys. Bye bye.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Apr 16, 2019

Are we living in a simulation? Craig is on the Jim Polito show this Tuesday morning as they discuss this possibility.


These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Are We Living In A Simulation? This MIT Scientist Says It’s More Likely Than Not
--- 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/16/2019

Living In A Simulation

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hi, everybody, sorry a little late getting it out today. I had a couple of meetings this morning and just tied me up. Anyhow, I think you're going to love this one. I don't know how much you've thought about virtual reality and its impact on us, where it is going. But Jim Polito and I had a good conversation about it this morning. It's something I've been thinking about for going on 25 years now. Are we living in a simulation? Could this happen in the future? So here we go with Jim.

Jim Polito 0:38
Here he is. The man who knows it all. Our tech talk guru and great friend, Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir.

Craig 0:45 
Hey, good morning, Jim.

Jim 0:48
Craig, you're scaring me. You're scaring me because you sent the material for our segment. And one of my favorite science fiction movies is The Matrix. The Revolutions and you know, the Reboot. They were okay. I mean Reloaded. But I gotta say you telling me than an MIT professor says that the concept of The Matrix, which is that we're all in a dream world right now, everything around us is all imaginary. It scares me.

Craig 1:29
I read a book years ago, I have this guy on my radio show, I tried to like the concept so much. And he was talking about something that a lot of our kids are really into now. And that's virtual reality, Have you tried any of this VR stuff?

Jim 1:48 
Just a couple of times, I mean, I like it. I think it's gonna I think it has some great applications for us. Yeah.

Craig 1:56 
Yeah. It does. They're using it now for medical care, remote doctors and things. It's just amazing. But you can still tell you know, it's virtual reality, but it's virtual reality kind of like cartoons were in the, in the 70s compared to what they're like today, you know. Today, you see some of the animated stuff like the new Lion King that's coming out. And it's hard to believe some of it just isn't real. You know, it's, it's, it's just amazing. Well, if we've got virtual reality today, that's like this, with the computers that we have and everything else, think of what virtual reality is going to be like in the next 10, 20, 30 years. Ultimately, you know, they're already working on this Jim, it's going to be indistinguishable from your regular life. So you're going to be able to see stuff and it's going to look real. You're going to be able to touch things and you will feel them you'll be able to smell things that are all around you. It's gonna be kind of cool because you can sit there on a beach in Fiji, in your home, in your living room chair. That's where it's all... think of that.

Jim 3:11
Hey, listen, that's all right. I'm all good for that. As long as I'm in control of this, and I know what's real and what's not. What is this MIT professors saying about this what's not real?

Craig 3:29
This is really kind of interesting. And I end the hypothesis is an interesting one too. And, you know, being a tech guy, I've been very interested this for a long time. You mentioned The Matrix came out in 99. There were two other movies that came out in 99 as well along the same lines. Well, this MIT professor's name is Virk, is saying that as well as many other people now including Elon Musk, if we're going to be able to get to a point where we can have virtual reality that is pretty much indistinguishable from the real world,w hat are the odds that we're not going to have simulations? What are the odds that we're not going to have things like you know, lived through World War Two? We've already got video games like that right? What's that called? Danny probably knows where, where you're in there to shoot them up World War Two game and you're you're going around and you just click on.

Jim 4 :28 
The Call of Duty?

Danny 4:29
Probably Call of Duty. Yeah.

Jim 4:30 
Is it Call of Duty?

Craig 4:32
Yeah, yeah. Call of Duty as an example, right. So when you're when you're in the future here, not the distant future, but the nearby future people are going to be playing games like Call of Duty. They're going to be on the beach are going to be having all of these things, and it will be quite real. Well, if you can have a simulation like that, in the future as computing improves, is that new technology coming up quantum computing, morphogenic computing and other things. In the future, we're going to have much more processing capability. So we could have things like The Game of Life. Now this, this goes way back, The Game of Life. And I don't know if you're quite geeky enough to... Oh, you remember that? Okay.

Jim 5:20 
I remember The Game of Life. Sure. We played it all the time.

Craig 5:23 
Yeah. And you had you had cells and they divided and things went on. The Game of Life where you started civilizations with certain parameters. The parameters can include there's water, does ice float or does it sink? Does this have a Game of Thrones world? Does that really exist and create those and spin them up? How about people who are in the school that at MIT and other places? Are they going to want to be able to use that technology to spin up a whole simulated civilization and have that civilization run out to see what history might have been like. So let's recreate our ancestors a hundred thousand years ago. And and start that simulation and see how they acted. Well, frankly, that's inevitable. That is going to happen. So let's crank that clock further ahead, let's crank crank it ahead 100 years 1000 years into our future we will have the capability to do that and have multiple simulations running on the same computer of entire societies. of entire civilizations crossing thousands of years. So if that's the case, if we can get to that point, ultimately what he's saying and many others have been saying is the odds are excellent that the millions to one, Jim, the odds are excellent that what we're living in is a virtual reality. That none of this is real. Because if there will be thousands or millions of these things spun up in the future, what are the odds that we are living in the very first, very initial society that creates this virtual reality?

Jim 7:34  
Oh my god. My mind got blown.  We're talking with Craig Peterson our tech talk guru. And it's like science fiction spilling over into reality and you know, Jules Verne, remember Jules Verne was writing these novels about man on the moon and all these other concepts that ultimately came to fruition and you know, are the novels of today doing that? And now you've got an MIT scientists saying, hey, how do you know you're not living in a, in right now in a virtual reality? Remember when I was young, the big deal was, hey, we could be, our universe could be inside a molecule in the finger of a giant in another universe, you know, like and that stuff used up blow your mind you'd be sitting there in college talking about that stuff. Just blow your mind. And yet this is really blowing my mind. This stuff.

Craig 8:40
It is something. This is like we're in a marble hanging on a cat's collar in Men in Black right? It is highly likely. It's called a simulation hypothesis. There are some excellent books that have been out there now for 20, 30 years about this. And you look at the Wachowski's movie series, The Matrix and some of these others. I'm trying to remember what the names of them were there a couple more in 99 but this guy's name is Rizwan Virk, I assume it's a guy, a computer scientist, video game developer, and he leads the PlayLabs over at MIT, came out with a book and he took he kind of define the, the whole thing called it the simulation hypothesis. And I've thought about this, thoroughly thought about this Jim for more than 20 years. And I don't see any way that it's not a simulation. Now, that doesn't mean that these people that believe this, don't believe in God or the God exists, or the benefits of religion or anything else, because who's saying what's being used ultimately. But if we can, if anyone can get to the point where you can't tell the difference. Even think of the Fifth Day right? That Arnold Schwarzenegger movie.

Jim 10:08 
Yeah, yeah. I believe that you could download everything in your brain.

Craig 10:11 
Everything in your brain and his buddy was, and his girlfriend was virtual. She wasn't real. And yet, everything seemed real, you know, these types of things and these hypotheses been  around for a long time. So it's fun to play with. I'm not sure it does any good in any direction at all.

Jim 10:35
Yeah, I know. I know other than blowing your mind and being good conversation. Especially younger.

Craig 10:37
It doesn't matter, right. It's kind of the bottom line. 

Jim 10:41
What difference does it make? If it's true, what difference does it make to me right now? I'm a Duracell battery. That's it.

Craig 10:48
I don't think that's the case.

Jim 10:51
If I am a battery, I'm definitely a D cell.

Craig 10:58
Here we go. Rim shot, please.

Jim 11:00
Here we go. Craig Peterson folks. Always blowing our minds so the great stuff. Now Craig Peterson can blow your mind to outside of the show. He the information that he provides to me and there was a lot of other stuff today butt I just picked this little Matrix like story you can get it to and also get updates when there's a big hack or something going wrong in the IT world Craig Peterson provides this for free to my listeners. He doesn't pester you doesn't try to sell you anything. And all you do is text my name to this number.

Craig 11:37
855-385-5553. That's 855-385-5553.

Jim 11:48 
And standard data and text rates apply. But I suggest you do it. And Craig, awesome segment and we'll catch up with you next week.

Craig 11:58
Hey take care. Thanks, Jim.

Jim 12:00
Thanks.

Craig 12:03 
Hey everybody. Thanks for listening. We'll be back tomorrow. Bye bye.

---

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Apr 15, 2019

Craig is on with Mr. Jack Heath discussing China's selling high tech software and hardware to monitor citizens to Latin America. They also talked about Amazon employees listening to what you tell Alexa.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

Amazon Workers Are Listening To What You Tell Alexa

China Selling High-Tech Tyranny To Latin America, Stoking US Concern

3 Technologies That Could Create Trillion-Dollar Markets Over The Next Decade
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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/15/2019

Trillion Dollar Markets - Amazon Workers Listening - China Selling Tyranny

Craig Peterson 0:00
Good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here this morning I was on with Mr. Jack Heath and Jack and I had a chance to talk about this whole China selling high tech tyranny to Latin America, three technologies that could create trillion dollar markets over the next decade. I didn't get to that on my weekend show like I had wanted to. And we talked a little bit more about Amazon workers listening to what you tell Alexa, is this a problem or is this just another case of the media hyping something up? So here we go with Jack.

Jack Heath 0:35
Craig Peterson, check out Craig Peterson, O-N.com. Good morning, Craig.

Craig 0:39
Hey, good morning, Jack.

Jack 0:41 
How are you?

Craig 0:44 
I'm doing well. We got a few really interesting articles this week. I don't know if you've heard about more concerns about Amazon workers, listening into what you're telling Alexa. I've seen a number of reports that are wrong, just kind of I think misguided here. Yes, they do listen to some of these recordings. In other words, they're not sitting there listening to microphones live in your house or your office. But the recordings that you are making, when you wake up the device, you know, you give the wake word, and then you ask it a question or give it a command. Those recordings are going up to the cloud, they're being processed in order to be able to do what you ask it to do. So in order for Amazon to get better at understanding what people are saying. They have to have people listen to it as well, from time to time. Make sure it's understanding it properly, and then change some of the programming. So for everyone out there, that's been getting kind of worried because of some of these semi fake news reports out there. It's not such a big deal. We've also got an article up on my site about some technologies, three new technologies that Barron's was talking about last week, that could create a trillion dollar market each one of these over the next decade. Now, you know, I'm not a financial advisor here. So this is not an investment advice, right? But you know, you look back to the 1950s. And you remember course all kinds of technology from then washing machines, vacuum cleaners, cars, TVs, and you go back another 50 years, and you really wouldn't recognize America, that's probably going to be the same going forward 50 years Jack. We're talking about things like CRISPR technology that's being used for gene editing, healthcare is on the brink of major changes. We're going to make custom drugs for people. In computing, we're moving from the digital world, Moore's law that's governed us for so long with computers doubling in speed is going away. We're moving to quantum computing, something called neuro morphic computing, which is mimicking the human mind and material science. You know, we've had, of course, Boeing in the news recently about the Max 8, well, they have a new plane coming out called the Boeing 787 Dreamliner. It's a lot like the predecessor, but because they've been using some powerful simulation machine learning, they can develop now, some new materials that they faster, 100 times, literally 100 times faster than they ever could before. So this new Dreamliner, even though it's mostly the same as the last model, it's going to be 20% lighter, and 20% more efficient. So we've got quite a world ahead of us, Jack.

Jack 3:41
Interesting. All right, what else? Any other interesting consumer tidbits or tips?

Craig 3:47
Yeah, yeah, there's been a lot of concern raised about Huawei. And what's been happening with 5G roll out. And I've always been concerned about government and advertisers even monitoring. Well, China has stepped in into this Venezuelan problem where we've got strong men, Nicolas Maduro down there, clinging to power. Remember, China has a software and hardware that's designed to monitor its, I don't want to call them citizens, because they're not it's a communist country, but to monitor the people. So they over in China have social credit, where you get jaywalk, and it dings you, right. Too many dings and you're out of luck. Well, now that they've sold that to Venezuela now, and they're issuing a card down their national ID card. It's a smart card. And it's used for the government to give you money. It's used for your banking, and it's used for your voting. And so now Maduro is allegedly now using this for social credit, where if you don't vote the right way, you will not be able to get money from the government.

Jack 5:00
Makes me want to live in China. Right. I'd be fined if I never go to China for a minute, no offense, but anyway.

Craig 5:06
Yeah. That's the case, and that's unfortunately coming here potentially with 5G. That's been some of the concerns people have been having.

Jack 5:15
Yeah, all right Craig good stuff. on this Monday morning Craig Peterson. http://CraigPeterson.com. His show of course on Saturdays, Tech Talk. Thanks, Craig.

Craig 5:23
Hey, take care Jack. 

Craig 5:28
Hey, if you're not a subscriber to the podcast, and you've been missing my new series that's right here on this same podcast channel. Make sure you subscribe. I would really appreciate it because we end up getting our word out to more people, the more that subscribe, that's what matters. And of course, the 800 pound gorilla in this market is still iTunes. So go to http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. If you haven't subscribed, please take a few minutes and subscribe right there. It would really really help I appreciate it. http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. Have a great day. We'll be back tomorrow and you know it's a security thing and take care. Bye bye.

---

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Apr 12, 2019

Are we in the Matrix?  Well, An MIT professor says our whole experience could be a simulation thing. So we'll get into that today

Are Amazon workers to your Alexa conversations? Well if they are it is for only max 30 seconds. They don't have context. I get it. It may be an invasion of privacy but could they tell anything about the context. We will delve into this more today

Why are conservatives (or so-called conservatives) saying we've got to start regulating the internet?  I will be covering the reasons why today.

Is China selling high tech tyranny to Latin America? And it's true, and it's scary and we will discuss it.

Then there is Malware that is attacking our Critical Infrastructure sites.  Today. it's on our list to discuss. 

We've talked about autonomous cars, and about insurance and liability for them before? However, the bigger concern is DATA!  Did you know that a car can generate about 25 gigabytes of data every hour, and as much as four terabytes a day? So, who's getting that data?  Listen in for my take on that

For all this and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/13/2019

Government Regs Killing Internet - China Selling Tyranny To Venezuela - Russian Malware Infecting Plants

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hello, everybody Craig Peterson here. We've got a lot of security and technology to talk about today, including one of my favorite topics, you might not be aware of this. But wow, you're going to love this.  It is from an MIT professor. And he agrees with me about this whole simulation thing. So we'll get into that in just a few minutes. I was watching the news this week. In fact, it was yesterday on Friday. And it was kind of crazy because they were talking about oh, my gosh, Amazon workers are listening to what you're telling Alexa and the, you know, invasion of privacy and all this other stuff? Really? Really? I don't think so. Okay, so we'll talk about that. What's really happening there. Your car? We know we've talked about autonomous cars are about insurance before? Where's the liability shifting? Is it something that you really have to worry about? Well, how about all of the data? It's saying right now, this is an article from Roll Call, that a car can generate about 25 gigabytes of data every hour, and as much as four terabytes a day. So who's getting that data? And what does it mean and what's going to happen? We've had more and more calls for government regulations over the internet. Now, we've seen a lot of those in Europe, we're going to talk about what's happening right now in the US. We've even got so-called conservatives, who are saying we've got to start regulating the internet, because, of course, they feel their voices are being squashed. So we'll talk about that. China selling high tech tyranny to Latin America. This is from the Washington Examiner, in kind of an intriguing headline. And it's true, and it's scary. We've got another piece of malware out there. It's called Triton. And now it is infected a second critical infrastructure site. This is a bad, bad thing. And one more that's in my show notes for this week. And we may not get to all of us on the air today, right. So make sure you visit them online, you're going to have to go to http://CraigPeterson.com. And you can subscribe right there to my weekly show notes. You get all of the top articles that I have found during the week, right there in the daily or the weekly newsletter comes out Saturday morning.

Craig 2:43 
But this particular one's interesting because 16 months ago, researchers were reporting and unsettling escalation in hacks, targeting power plants. This is from ArsTechnica.com. And we talked a little bit about that before. And, you know, we know about some of the compromises that happened, for instance, in Iran that was conducted by the US and Israel. But what's unprecedented in this attack is the use of advanced malware that is targeting the site's safety processes. So it's shutting down all kinds of things that are going to help keep the plants safe. And when you think about gas field pressures, reactors, reactor temperatures rising, it gets very, very nasty, you know. Some of this stuff is designed to automatically close valves to really mess you up. And when we say mess you up, we mean to make that whole nuclear power plant go into a meltdown.

Craig 3;48 
So what's happening with this? There's some researchers over at FireEye who are saying that this same security firm, by the way, discovered Triton, and it ties it to Russia, that they've uncovered an additional intrusion use the same malicious software framework against a different critical infrastructure site. So I guess the big question here is, Does this mean that countries like Russia, for instance, are using malware as kind of a first strike opportunity? Right? It's hard to trace, it's hard to prove that it's them that that attacked you. Right? How can you prove it?

Craig 4:30
Well, frankly, you can't in most cases, it just has fingerprints, like the Russian language, or this is attacks we know, that have previously come from Russia. Those are the types of things that we've got to watch out for. And we now know that Russia has been involved in some this hacking. We know China has been involved in some. North Korea has been involved in some to let me tell you, it's a different world. And the next war we have is going to be a much different war, that's for sure.

Craig 5:03 
Let's talk about this China story here, where China is selling some high tech tyranny to Latin America. This is, as I mentioned, the Washington Examiner. And this is very, very concerning. Because what we found now is China has been working with these companies like Huawei, which we know about, it's been a very, very big deal. And Huawei's devices have been banned from US military bases, and from others, but it's also saying this ZTE, is tied into this. And we know about the concerns with 5G and ZTE and all of the stuff that's going on all this stuff they're doing. And we're getting really concerned now because what's happening is that China is taking these tools that they've developed in order to monitor their people within China and really displace the United States. They're putting all of the surveillance equipment all around the US and the Western Hemisphere. Well, not so much in Canada, although, obviously with 5G rollouts, we do have some of that Chinese equipment going up there. But they're supporting right now Venezuelan strong man, Nicolas Maduro, the current president who's really clinging to power, after the western democracies, I think all of them said, Yeah, you got to be out of there. And recognize the opposition lawmakers, the interim president, China has been exporting technology that helps a South American socialist to monitor and strong arm the Venezuelan people, which is what he's been doing for quite a while. So here's an example of politics being really promoted and expanded the power base due to some of this technology. So think about that now. China is really now intertwined in the Western Hemisphere and things that are going on. And they're able to surveil, monitor, surrounding the US, that's all part of the Asia Pacific influence that they've been building here for a while. And it's very concerning very, very concerning. 

Craig 7:24
Maduro, by the way, paid ZTE as part of this, but to build a $70 million database and payment system for what they're calling a homeland card. Now, what's concerning about this is this so-called homeland card, that ZTE sold the technology to Maduro for is designed to be used to control access to food, to cash, bonuses, social services, a social credit system for a political control mechanism. In fact, it's even used to track your voting. So they know how you voted, it's recorded right there with the card, it goes into the database. This is all part of their smart card thing. And if you don't vote the right way, what's going to happen? It's just like in Chicago, right? If you don't pay the local Chicago thugs in the party that's in control in Chicago, you know, all of the criminal activity that's been alleged there for years, much of it's been proven, in fact, you end up with potholes in your street that won't get fixed, because you've been speaking out against the local candidate for the town, for the city, for the county, for the state. It's just it's still so corrupt in Chicago. It's unbelievable, how bad it is there. Well, it is much, much worse in Venezuela using these Chinese technologies that the Chinese have been building. Have you seen the Black Mirror episode, for those that are sci-fi fantasy, it is a series out of UK, it's a really, really good one. And the whole idea, the whole premise behind this particular episode is that every time you do something, you get social credit, or you get credit taken away from you. And this poor lady just ends up in a downward spiral and, and has no credit left, right? It gets to be really, really bad. Well, in China, now, they have facial recognition technology all over the place throughout all of the major cities. If you jaywalk, you get points taken away, because the computers know who you are. And now you don't have the social credit. And if you don't have the social credit, because you've done things that the socialist, communist government doesn't like, you cannot vote, you can't get on an airplane, you can't get on a train even they block you from those if you don't do what you're told to do. And if you're not politically correct. Free speech is just going down the tubes worldwide and very, very scary. So let's talk about friends speech here for a minute.

Craig 10:01
Here's an article from the Daily Mail. And course they are ahead of us in some of this stuff, right? Free speech is outlawed in the United Kingdom. Now, it's legally outlawed in Canada, you cannot say certain things. You can't even ask legitimate questions, legitimate political questions. You cannot have a dialogue about certain things. You know, if you question about somebody's birth sex, and now they say, well, you have to use this gender when addressing me, or you're supposed to go on bended knee to his or her royal highness and request permission to speak to them what's going on? Because in Canada, and in the UK, if you say something they don't like, you can go to jail. And it's that simple. So there is no freedom of speech there. And in the US now, we've got these fascists running around, who are beating people up, threatening people, yelling, screaming, trying to stop free speech rights. And that is the definition of fascism, isn't it? It's a definition of socialism or communism, they all do it. They all try and stop free speech because they don't want the free exchange of ideas because their ideas are right. And the only reason it hasn't worked before is because of what? Well, because the other people weren't smart enough. We're smart, our generation is smarter than all generations that have ever come before us. Right? That is not what they say. So now we're tying technology into this. We're seeing it in China. Big time, big time. And we're now seeing it in Venezuela, as the current president tries to hold on to his socialist powers to control everyone's lives. And of course, people are dying, they're starving, They're digging through trash to try and find food. Right? A socialist utopia, just like the Soviet Union became?

Craig 11:57
Well, now we're looking at government regulations. In the US over free speech in places like the public square. Is Facebook, the public square? Is Twitter the public square? Obviously not. But we passed laws in the US that said, Hey, listen, we're going to consider you as a public square, all you have is a faucet. And all of these ideas are coming out of that faucet. And therefore, we are not going to allow anyone to hold you liable for the things that your users say online. And that's the sort of thing that you expect from free and open fair discussions from a democracy, right? You expect that kind of free speech, and you don't want to have regulations or restrictions on the people that are providing those free speech areas, just like the public square. You could go get a soapbox, you could stand up in the public square, and you could say anything you wanted, no matter how crazy it was. Right? That that was the idea of the public square. That was the idea behind the laws that are protecting Facebook and Twitter and, and others online.

Craig 13:14 
Well, now we found that they are doing various types of censorship, let's put it that way. Google is being sued. And just this week, a big lawsuit was announced, because Google's showing search results that favor them versus their competitors. Now, I gotta say, if you're writing code that's going to give good search results, of course, you have to discriminate against materials that you don't consider to be, you know, up to your standard that people aren't looking at that aren't, aren't popular.

Craig 13:52
But if you're looking for an unpopular opinion online, you know, remember, the majority isn't always right. Right? Slavery. The majority of people endorsed it, but it wasn't right. It was never right. So just because of the majority says something should be done. And just because political correctness would lead me to believe that that's what you should do. That doesn't mean that it is the right thing. Well, China's walled off a lot of Western services on the internet, you've heard about the Great Firewall of China before. The UK now is planning to hold executives personally liable for posts on social media that they consider harmful or illegal because remember, there's no free speech in the UK anymore. And this came out in the government white paper on Monday this week. They say this would put the country at the far end of internet censorship and further fuel, what they're calling now this splinternet. This is a term circulated for, you know, more or less a decade here, this gained some popularity recently. And this comes in the tail end of Mark Zuckerberg saying, you know, Facebook's chief, that he wants a common global frame that a framework of internet rules, which is never going to happen, right. Tim Burners Lee, you might remember him, he started the worldwide web's, software. And he came up with what he called a contract for the web that establishes an ethical sense of principles for the internet. A whole lot here. The New Zealand Christchurch mosques, massacre, you remember, this was very recent as well live streamed online. It's a heightened sense of urgency in New Zealand. They just knee-jerked, passed laws within two weeks that change the face of what's happening there. Huge debates in the US and the EU on curbing what they're calling incitement to violence. Now, obviously, you can tie this into, can I yell fire in a crowded theater? Right? There's a lot of things that you could do here.

Craig 16:10
In free speech, that would step over lines like that. So how about the line for inciting to violence? What is that? What does it mean? Well, in Australia, there's a law now it's a new one that can jail social media executives for failing to take down violent extremist content quickly. A proposal in Britain that makes executives personally liable for harmful common content posted on social platforms. How do you define this? How do you define harmful content? Where is the line? If someone says, Oh, my feelings were hurt? Is that harmful? Well, of course, it is, because their feelings were hurt. So does that mean we can't say anything that might upset anyone again, refer back to that, that Black Mirror episode of the UK proposal, this is from a White House technology advisor, who's now over at MIT says that it's a very bad look for rights-respecting democracy to do what they're doing in the UK would place the UK toward the foreign the internet censorship spectrum.

Craig 17:19
And the UK culture Secretary says, you like that? They got a culture Secretary over there. The Culture Secretary says the proposed laws will not limit press freedom. Okay, so where's the line on the press? Look what's happening right now, the Ecuadorian embassy in Britain. And you have a guy who is now under arrest, who's claiming he is a publisher, right? He published documents that were stolen by two military members, one was a military contractor and one, another military man who was working with secret information. Was he a publisher? Did he help them steal it by providing instructions on how to sneak classified information out? Was he a co-conspirator? There's just so much right now going on. And you know, when we're looking at free speech, I think free speech is almost absolute.

Craig 18:23
If it can be shown that something caused physical harm to someone, you know, that's kind of where the my you're right to swing your fist stops where my nose begins. Now, obviously, at some point, while that fist is being swung, I'm feeling threatened.

Craig 18:42
But where do you draw the line? Well, I think you draw the line at touching me, certainly at hitting my nose. And this is something that the internet pioneer has never really thought about. Remember, I've been on the internet since 83. Of course, it wasn't called that back then. We had different types of networks and things. But since 83, and free speech was always a big deal. We didn't really get free speech until September of 91 online, because it was still heavily controlled by the federal government. Remember it was a federal government research project that funded it, but then they kind of let loose of it in 91. But man, what a world out there. 

Craig 19:22 
Let's get into this Amazon article right now. I was listening to the news. I was watching a morning news program, in fact, this week, and they were talking about how bad it is that Amazon Alexa workers are sitting there listening to you. Okay, so that's one level. And then they said, Oh, and on top of it now, they won't call the police if they hear something that might be bad. Now, I like it. I like that, right. And I understand the first part. And I like the second part. Because you know, the second part, you don't have the full context, you've got a 3o second snippet. You know, somebody wakes up that that Amazon device, or that Google device, or whatever it might be. You wake it up, it records for up to 32nd, sends it up to the cloud, processes it, and then execute your command. So they're listening to max 30 seconds. You don't have context. You don't know what's going on. And you certainly don't want to destroy people's lives over a vague suspicion. Right. So I like that. I really like that. It's just like as when I spent 10 years in emergency medicine, we were all mandated-reporters. But we did not have to report unless we thought there might be something going on that's reportable.

Craig 20:52
So I think that's a pretty straightforward thing. I think that's pretty simple to look at and understand because it didn't think that something was reportable, then I never reported it. And so different people had different bars, right? How high that was. Now, let's go to the first part of this where they were very upset that Amazon employees were listening in.

Craig 21:17
It's very limited when Amazon employees are listening in and they're not listening to all of the audio coming from your house. So listening to at most that 30-second snippet, when you told Alexa, that you had a command for her. That's it. That's that simple. And what they're doing is they're using your audio to better the speech interpretation, better the machine learning, so that it understands how people are asking questions, what sort of accents they might have, how it works. For instance, when I talked to Alexa, I get great responses, because she understands me. She understands me speaking, hopefully, you guys do too. But my wife has issues with it. I have a son that has issues with it. And that has to do with your cadence, your clarity of speech, right, enunciation. And how do you improve your software? You improve it by testing. How do you test software, that design that's intended to be able to process human speech and understand what it's going for? Understand what the goal is of that human that's asking you to do something? Well, this is the only way to do it. Right? They don't have these employees that hear the audio don't have your name. They don't have your account number, they have no idea who you are, they don't have the email address. All they have is a snippet of sound, and how the Alexa voice processor processed it. So they can listen to what they can see was Alexa correct in parsing much you said? And was it correct in understanding your intention behind what you said? So it's pretty simple, it's pretty straightforward. Don't get too freaked out about this. And there have been court cases where Amazon has been asked for and did provide under court order, the audio that has been captured. But remember, it's very limited audio. And unless that device has been hacked, and you know, it hasn't happened in at least a couple of years that I'm aware of. If it's hacked, it is possible to make it so it's recording. But the way the hardware setup in that Alexa, it cannot record you, unless that little light is on. It's a physical hardware limitation that they purposely built into it. So it's not as though they can just turn on the microphone and life is good. It's like on your MacBook Pro, the hardware that when your camera is active, that light comes on. It's all designed in one piece. So unlike many Windows machines, you can't just turn on the camera and not have that green light come on. The same thing with Alexa. Now, if you have physical access to the device, there may be you know, there's always ways right ultimately, to get into that.

Craig 24:22 
Man, we are almost out of time. Three technologies that could create trillion dollar markets over the next decade. I got that from Barons, but it's up there on http://CraigPeterson.com. Very interesting. And they talk about some genetic stuff and quantum computing and material science. You'd find that fascinating, I'm sure and I have it up again along with all of these at my website http://CraigPeterson.com. And if you go to htttp://CraigPeterson.com/radio-show, you'll see my show notes, but you also get those in the email if you signed up. This is the one that I really am interested in.

Craig 25:03
Are we living in an illusion? Did you notice back in 99, there were three movies that came out that were implying, inferring, opening our minds to the possibility that we are living in a simulation. And I had a guest on my show about that time. He's just a regular engineer. But he had done a lot of thought a lot of research and put together a book that was specifically addressing that question. Very thick book, very convincing book. And he did all the math behind it. And basically, what he said is that, eventually, any civilization will get good enough to be able to have a virtual reality that's indistinguishable from the real thing.

Craig 25:52
And the odds are that within 20, 30 years from now, that'll be true here. You'll be able to plug yourself in one way or the other and live in whatever worlds you want to. Have a vacation in Fiji and just enjoy it and not have any jet lag okay. That's coming. So if that happens, basically he said the odds are millions to one that we are living in that timeline that invented this virtual reality.

Craig 26:28
We may be all running this, this whole world, this universe that we perceive around us, is millions to one likely to be a simulation. We are not likely to be that very first time through. And what's interesting is this ties into a lot of religions as well. Because again, God created the heavens in the earth. He did it in six days. Oh, maybe he did. Maybe we're running in a simulation, and on a computer in somebody's basement? Who knows what we're doing? And are we all just artificial intelligence programs? So this is fascinating. When I get this book, Rizwan Virk, I may try and get him on the radio show. He's a computer scientist. Video game developer, he leads PlayLabs at MIT. And his book's called The Simulation Hypothesis. I love it. I love just the mental gyrations you kind of have to go through to think about this and the potential of being a simulation.

Craig 27:33 
Well, I appreciate everybody being with us today. We will be back next week. And course I've been releasing podcast now, six days a week. Most weeks, it's you know, it's between two and six. But most recent six weeks we have you know, It's A Security Thing where we're talking about current recent security problems businesses have had what could have been done to prevent them what you can do, and then also just talking about all these great articles that we send out in our show notes. So have a great day. We'll see you next week and thanks for listening. http://CraigPeterson.com for more. Bye-Bye

 

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---

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Apr 12, 2019

It's another Security Thing Friday. Craig talks about the new bug that lets criminals in on the photos we share and upload in Google Photos.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/12/2019

Google Photos Bug Lets Criminals In

Craig Peterson 0:03
Hi, welcome to the Friday edition of It's a Security Thing. We're going to talk today a little bit about another type of vulnerability that is kind of more potential it is real and it can be done. It's not terribly complex. But you have to be a real target in order for it to really hit you at all. And this particular one has to do with Google Photos. Now, you might use Google Photos. There's a lot of different photo sharing services out there, Flickr was recently purchased. And there is all kinds of data that you have in these different services that you might not realize is there. Now Google Photos is really kind of cool when you get behind the scenes. It knows tons of information about anybody that has uploaded photos to it. And it's automatically tagging the images. Now it takes the metadata from the image. And if you haven't stripped it, that includes things like the date and time it was taken, the actual GPS coordinates, the location that it was taken. And then what Google Photos does, is it has kind of an artificial intelligence engine. And it looks for objects and events that might be occurring in the background of the photo. So might look at the picture and say, wow, this looks like a wedding dress, and the groom is all dressed up. And there's other details that might indicate a wedding. So it says, oh, wow, this is a wedding.

Craig 1:40
Or there's a waterfall in the background, it's at sunset, it figures out just tons of stuff based on the location and time that are in the picture, as well as the picture contents itself. It's a really good, really quite cool. It's also using facial recognition, and using that to tag people who are also present in the photos. So here's what happens with Google Photos search engine. I just love this idea. I'm tempted to upload photos to it because of this. But in the Google Photos search engine, you can do a search like photos of me and Karen from Paris 2017. And Google Photos knows enough information to be able to find it. I could say Google Photos of me in Paris in Google Photos of me in wherever it was I was at or near this or near that. It's very impressive what Google's doing. So a security researcher decided, Hmm, I wonder what I can do here. And he went in, I'm trying to find his name. Its Massas, I think, is it? Yeah, it's Ron Massas. And he went in and he said, I wonder if this data could be hacked? And he found that indeed, it could be but only under some pretty specific circumstances, which people could be tricked into doing. And then it can find out things about, you know, obviously, this would be for very specific type of attack. They're doing spearphishing. And you if you listen to my interviews this week on the radio, you know, a lot about spearphishing, more than you might want to know and sextortions that are going on right now. 

Craig 3:48
So he was able to do a side attack on Google Photos, and was able to figure out what people had done, where they had gone at what they had done when they were there various other things. Again, it's a kind of a complex thing. But it does make me think and probably makes you think about Google and these other sites. All of the stuff we have put out there, and that we've given Google and these other companies access to. Is it legit? Is it something we should be doing? And that's the reason I haven't uploaded my photos to Google Photos. Because I'm not sure I want Google to know about all this stuff. And I most particularly don't want Google to end up selling that information or being hacked, and having that information stolen, because that happens all too often not so much with Google, although it does happen with them. But with information that we upload all the time. Remember, yesterday, we're talking about software as a service. And Apple is very good about not mining data to advertise. Apple makes its money by selling new hardware and some software. Google makes its money by analyze you and trying to figure out everything it can about you so that it can sell your information to advertisers. So up to you what you want to do. But again, here's another risk. And I bet most of us just didn't know, Google was doing all of this with photos we uploaded to Google Photos. I certainly didn't.

Craig 5:20 
Alright, everybody. Have a great weekend. Make sure you tune in on Saturday morning. You should be getting my emails if not go to http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe. But once you get my emails, you will see all of the articles I talked about during the week. And it's important to keep up on all of that stuff. And also you can listen you can just click and listen right there to this week, Saturday show podcast. All of that stuff right there at http://CraigPeterson.com. So I'll be back Saturday, and then I'll be back to my regular schedule Monday through Friday with podcasts next week. Thanks everybody. Make sure you subscribe. http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. You'll find me right there or /TuneIn. I'm on a whole bunch of sites out there, but subscribing really helps. Because that raises us in the chart and lets people know that hey, they might want to listen to the show too. Take care everybody. Bye bye.

 

---

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Apr 11, 2019

Craig is back with another Security Thing. Today, he talks about the dangers of using Box, Dropbox, and other cloud storage services.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/11/2019

Dangers Of Using Box Dropbox

Craig Peterson 0:05
Hey, good morning, everybody, Craig Peterson here. And of course, it's time for our It's Security Thing. Man, I have been so busy the last few weeks delivering on my cyber security course. I have to apologize because I was looking in the logs and it's been like two or three weeks since I got a security thing podcast out. So sorry about that, everybody. But today, we are going to be talking about a real danger that many businesses are facing when it comes to using software as a service. You know, it has been kind of build as a panacea for everybody that, hey, listen, you don't have to worry about your servers, your file servers, your employees, etc. Just use this cloud service. That's what software as a service is. Instead of buying some software and having to run it yourself, all you have to do is stick it up in the cloud. And once it's up in the cloud, my goodness, then you got professionals who know what they're doing that are going to keep all of your data safe, and hopefully keep your data backed up and keep the software up to date. Right? It's just wonderful. In reality, that's not the case. And there's a great article that I put up on my website this week, that's talking about security professionals, IT professionals saying the biggest threat that they have is, drumroll please, internal users. And the reason they're saying its own user basis and biggest threat is because they just are not educated enough. And you know, they're not IT professionals. Well, even if you are an IT professional, what we're going to talk about right now is a problem that dozens, probably hundreds of companies. But now this researcher found dozens, it's called Adversus is the cybersecurity firm, found dozens of companies that had misconfigured their Box account. Now Box is used by many companies, we use it ourselves, we use it for communicating with clients, we haven't set up for other clients. Now, we've kind of switched from Box to Dropbox because I like the integration better. But still, some of our clients are using Box. And these security researchers found that many people who are part of these corporate accounts on Box, Box calls them their enterprise accounts, have been sharing files. Well, you know, isn't that part of the purpose of using Dropbox or Box to be able to share files with other people within the organization and outside of the organization? That I do it all of the time? And the answer is yes. Obviously, that's one of the purposes of using Box.

Craig 2:58
But by default. What are your settings when you create this link to share? Because once you've created this link, if you use default settings, that link can be used by anyone inside or outside your company to be able to access the information. So what you have to do and this is true in Google Docs, have you noticed this before? If you have a Google document or a file in Google Drive, and you share it, you do have the option to change the default. So by default, it's anyone with the link can view for instance, in Google Docs, and you can change it to they can they can edit it. I think that there's a third option to remember what it is right now. But you can change those settings. But by default, it's view. Well, in the case of Box here, and they may be changing this, but they have found that the default in Box allows anyone to be able to view the data that is shared with the link, which is not terrible, right. But here's your problem. We've got now Singapore Airlines that we found online a link to their Box account, and you're able to get in there change reservations that were booked with Amadeus. Apple, with several folders exposed containing what appeared to be non sensitive internal data such as logs and regional price lists.

Craig 4:33
Oh that's not sensitive right?

Craig 4:35
Reading from the article here that you can find on my website down on TechCrunch where it originated. Discovery Network had more than a dozen folders, Edelman. I've worked with them many times it booked many guests on my radio show hundreds. That's a big public relations firm had an entire project proposal for working with New York City mass transit divisions, including all of their detailed proposal plans more than a dozen resumes, a potential staff for the project, including their names, email address, phone numbers, etc. Herbalife left several folders exposed continuing files and spreadsheets on about 100,000 customers, including names email addresses, phone numbers. Opportunity International, this is a nonprofit, exposed a massive spreadsheet list of donor names, addresses and account information amount given. Schneider Electric Pointe Claire, United Tissue Network, I'm not going to go through all of these will just kind of stop there. But my goodness gracious.

Craig 5:38
So how do you stop this from happening because you do want to be able to share, that's part of the purpose of these things like Box and Dropbox? Well, there is a default setting for your business. When you're in there. Make sure the default setting is to share with internal company users by default. So that someone if they want to share it outside of the company has to purposely change the setting to share that file or that folder with someone outside of your company's account, your Box account or Dropbox account. Now this actually now reveals another potential security problem and that is that you could have someone for instance, I've seen this before. A sales guy, I hate to keep picking on sales guys, but sales guy who shared a whole folder of all of the company's customers, all of their contact information, all of their purchases, payment records, everything, he shared it with his personal email address, and then ended up leaving the company within about I think was a week. Isn't that surprising. Well, isn't that special. And so now he had all of the company's information, of course, he ended up getting sued over this whole thing, that company figured out what it happened. Which means, again, if you're an IT professional, make sure these sharing sites are configured to only share by default internally. Make sure also you audit what's being shared and with whom, because the enterprise additions from Box and Dropbox both give you that option. You might even want to tie it in with an API into an internal database where you record the logs, you save them and you analyze them. And then make sure you educate your internal user base about some of the risks of sharing these files. And for everyone out there, remember that just because it's software as a service, and it's a cloud service, whether it's Microsoft, Google, or in this case Box, remember that they are maybe professionals, but their number one concern and priority is not your data. And if you don't get in high enough level of service with them, you might be completely out of luck. And this is something I see all of the time. You know, we'll put a proposal and say okay, here's what we're going to do for you going to provide you because you want to move to the cloud, we can provide you with Microsoft email and, and the Office 365. So you can run all the Office apps on all your devices and link it together. And they come back and they said no, thanks. We're all set. And then we find out later on, they just went and bought a regular subscription to Office 365. And it wasn't doing backups. And it didn't have data locked down. It didn't have restrictions on it. And it didn't have the right kind of filters and they ended up getting compromised because they didn't know what they were doing. And Microsoft just doesn't care about you, frankly, they just don't. You are a number to them. And you think when they're billing you 20 bucks a month, they're going to pay me much attention to you. The answer is No. Of course not.

Craig 9:04
So anyhow, keep an eye out. Be careful out there. Software as a Service, Cloud Services is not a panacea. And most IT department surveyed in this country say that it is right now their number one concern. So take care, pay attention.

Craig 9:24
You know, It's a Security Thing. And I'll probably be back tomorrow I think I'm going to be able to carve out a little time to do recording for you for Friday, because every day there's another security breach. This is another recent one by the way, eighth of March this came out. So about a month old.

Craig 9:40
Take care everybody. Bye Bye. Thanks for listening.

---

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Apr 10, 2019

Craig is on the WGAN Morning News. This morning they talked about the dangers of spam, spear phishing, and sextortion emails. They also talked about the Supreme Court taxing the online stores.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

The US Has Stepped Up Its Tax Game. You Will Want To Read This If You’re Selling Online

Latest Tactics Used By Cybercriminals To Bypass Traditional Email Security
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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/10/2019

Internet Sales About To Be Taxed - Dangers Of Spam

Craig Peterson  0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. Sorry, yesterday, I was not able to record a little intro to my Jim podcast. But anyhow, I am today. And we're planning on doing a security thing this week to on Thursday and Friday. So keep an ear out for that. I got a couple of real interesting cases that we're going to be talking about. Some major companies and some small companies and what happened to them this week with leaking sensitive data. So this morning, I was on with Ken and Matt. And we talked about two different things. We talked about something I did not talk with Jim about yesterday. And that is how the US has stepped up its tax game. And what is happening with the tax jurisdictions, the Supreme Court decision last fall, that really is going to change everything. So I talked to them about that. And then also, of course course about email, and the email problems we're having right now, the switch, frankly, that's been occurring in spearphishing that I saw starting in about six weeks ago, but now it's starting to reach epidemic levels a lot higher than the measles right now. Anyhow, take care. And here we go. be back tomorrow

Matt Gagnon 1:21
7:38 WGAN Morning News on a Wednesday, which means that it's time to talk to Craig Peterson, our tech guru who joins us now as he always does at this time, except for last week when he didn't join us. So he's back. Ladies and gentlemen, Craig, how are you?

Craig 1:34
I am. I was at a conference last weekend in Phoenix, Arizona.

Matt 1:41
Excuses, excuses.

Ken Altshuler 1:41
So let's see probably the same kind of whether you're experiencing this week here in town.

Craig 1:46
Pretty much the you know, it was about 70 degrees inside the conference room for five days. And then I heard rumors that it was in the 90s outside. Yeah, I was a good little boy and stayed in there. The whole time learned and contributed.

Matt 1:59
Soldiered on.

Ken 2:02
So well. Why don't we start off with email security. This is very safe as I know. We don't have to worry about anything about email security now do we?

Craig 2:12
Yeah. Well there are some changes in this. I don't know if you guys noticed some of the changes in the emails that are coming in, these these spear phishing attacks?

Ken 2:21
Spear phishing attacks.

Matt 2:24 
I don't really like fish.

Ken 2:25
I don't really mind spearfishing, sounds kind of...

Craig 2:27
You can't connect, you know, normally when you're spearfishing, you can't you don't get a whole bunch of fish or better with a big net. And for years, that's what they did, what they would do is send out emails, the exact same emails to as many email addresses as they could get their hands on. And some people would respond. And there's some interesting science behind this, you know, the Nigerian prince scams that are still going on, but not at the rate they used to. They would have spelling mistakes and grammatical, you guys must have noticed that right?

Matt 3:00 
Yeah. A little bit, yeah.

Craig 3:02 
Yeah. And did you realize that the intention of them putting in, the intent behind putting in the grammatical grammatical errors, as well as the spelling mistakes, was to catch people that weren't terribly smart, because they were thinking, well, if they don't notice, if they can get past all of the grammar errors and things, then maybe we can convince them to send us some money, so that we can rescue the Nigerian prince. And that worked and it worked with a quite a few people over a lot of years. And unfortunately, it really hit the senior community because they, this is all new, they weren't paying that type of close attention. Well, now we've gotten smarter. So rather than casting these huge nets out there, what the bad guys have been doing is they're still phishing but now they're phishing individuals. And this is a problem that comes from all of the data breaches over the years, it seems like almost every week now we hear about another massive data breach. So on the dark web, there are databases of hundreds of millions. We just found one this year already that had 2 billion records in it, of people's email addresses their passwords, etc. So the bad guys are get a little smarter. They've been doing business email compromise attack that we kind of talked about before, FBI has been warning about them for quite a while, over $12 billion in cash stolen over the last few years to the business email compromise attacks. But what I want to talk about now is a new type of email attacks that's been happening, because they have so much data. They've been doing spear phishing attacks in the realm of what's called nowadays, sextortion. And they'll send an email out, the emails look like it's just a regular warning email, it'll say, so the subject might be warning, your end, it'll give your email address ken@gmail.com, for instance, account has been compromised. And then you go into the email because it looks like a warning. And it may look like it's from Google. In fact, right now, the majority, the number one source for these emails is Gmail. So you'll get an email is coming from Gmail. So Google, right you have using, so you open it up, look inside it says, Ken, this is a warning that your ken@gmail.com account has been compromised. And they give you some other information like your password. So with the sextortion email, what they're doing is they're saying, Ken we have a video of you on and they'll name some pornographic website, and your password on that site is this. Now remember what we keep warning people about week after week, and that is don't use the same email address on multiple sites, right? People are still using the same email address on multiple sites. And so the problem that's arisen from all of this is that people are getting the email, it says, we caught you, we have you on video at this porn site. Here's your password for that porn site, pay up now, or we are going to release this information. And right now, which of course is a former blackmail, and it's about 10% of all of the spear phishing attacks, it is increasing. If you are, if you have a business email address that's been compromised in a breach, you're twice as likely to be the target of blackmail now, than business email compromise. So this is a very, very big deal. I've had listeners who have reached out to me and said, Oh, I got this email and they tell me what it is. They say Should I get a lawyer involved? And you know, bottom line? It obviously it's up to you. But this is now the fastest growing type of attack. So advice for everybody how to stop this. Change all your email passwords and addresses. Matt, you said you use LastPass right?

Matt 7:26
Yes I do.

Craig 7:28
Yeah, LastPass is great. You know, I prefer 1Password. It's a lot better for businesses group account sharing, you know, accounts that you might have to share inside of business with different vaults and things. But both of them are excellent. And what I'll do is everybody that's on my text list, I'll send out this thing later today. And I'll give out the phone number. So you can text me and I'll send it to this, I'm not selling anything, I'm going to send you my report that compares the password services so you can change your password and get that stuff all straight. I'll send that out after we get off the air here. But this is huge. And it's been successful, because people are still using the same email and the same password on multiple websites I live. There's the biggest tip of the day right there.

Matt 8:22
Were talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru, he joins us on Wednesdays at this time to go over what's happening in the world of technology, let's say for the sake of argument, Mr. Peterson that I sell stuff online. And and you know what i tax is kind of an open question sometimes. The United States seems to have recently paid a little bit more attention to this and trying to figure out how to actually extract more blood from the stone. So tell us a little bit about what you should be aware of if you're a retailer that sells stuff online.

Craig 8:52
Yeah, if you're selling stuff online, there's a US Supreme Court case last year that was heard. And it's between Wayfair, which is this big online furniture and home goods company. Have you, I've seen it online.

Matt 9:07
Oh yeah sure, absolutely.

Craig 9:08
And Wayfai'r's online and the State of South Dakota, said people in South Dakota who are buying from Wayfair should be paying our state sales tax. Which makes sense, right? I can see that. But the question is Wayfair, who has no presence in South Dakota, no physical presence, know nexus at all, says, Hey, listen, we're not there. And we know that Congress has really protected the internet from sales taxes, and having to pay it because they kind of wanted it to grow. And it's just a nightmare if they had to collect sales tax. So the US Supreme Court overturned the law on not taxing companies that had no state nexus. So now, things are going to get very messy, because companies that are selling online, are going to end up having to collect sales tax for every sales tax jurisdiction in the United States. And it's estimated that there are some 9000 different sales taxes across the United States, because they're not just talking about the state taxes, which range from 4.7 to 13.5%. Right now, but we're including local sir taxes, like, if you live in New York City, you've got New York state tax, you've got the county tax, you've got the city tax, it gets kind of crazy. So they're trying to be kind of reasonable in the ruling. So they're saying there are going to be thresholds. So most, and this is state by state, by the way, which makes it even more of a nightmare. So some states are saying if you sell 100,000 dollars of product in our state, you now have to pay and withhold the sales taxes. And the threshold varies as I said. Now, big companies like our friends over at Amazon, I love this, because they can easily take care of all of us state sales tax and messes and county and the city and everything else. But the little guys can't. And so amazon for quite a while has been saying yeah, yeah, we we are we sure have internet sales tax. If this is going to hurt some companies, obviously $100,000 is quite a few sales. But depending on what you're doing, keep an eye out. Now there are a couple of companies that have popped up in the last little while. Paddle is one of them. But there's others that are able to do this for you. But I think what's going to happen is this is going to help Amazon in another way. And that is if you're selling things online, you're just going to sell them through Amazon, or through eBay, and let them worry about all of the red tape of filing with some 9000 different taxes in, you know hundreds of jurisdictions throughout the country. So you're right about that Matt. And if I could text out the links, I also have something this is a free service that Google has, I'll send you a link to this as well. And what it does is it gives you on your screen, it doesn't send you emails or anything it asks you for your name and email. And it what it does, it doesn't use it other than to try and fool you on the web page. So it'll run you through eight different emails will show them to you on the web page. You can hover over the links and things and it'll help you understand better whether or not you are, you know, educated enough, if you will, about these types of attacks to protect yourself. So we'll give you a little quiz and help you out and answer your questions. So I'll text that out as well. So if you just text either Ken or Matt to me at 855-385-5553. I will send you links to both of those things on the password managers, a big article I wrote on that. And then also a link to Google's really cool little training thing you can use for yourself and people in your company to help your spear phishing. So just Ken or Matt just text either to me 855-385-5553 and I'll send that out to you later on today. I'm not going to spam you. I don't sell these things. I just want to get the information out there because I can't believe these things are working.

Ken 13:53
Craig Peterson our tech guru joins us every Wednesday at 7:38. Get all of his information directly from him. Thank you, Craig we'll talk to you next week.

Craig 14:05
Hey gentlemen, take care. Bye bye. 

Craig 14:10 
Alright guys have a great day. It is going to be a busy one today for me because I had my last coaching call from the Cybersecurity Do It Yourself course this afternoon so I gotta get ready for that. Off I go. Take care everybody. Bye bye. 

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

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Apr 9, 2019

Craig is on with Jim Polito this morning. They talked about sextortion scams being circulated in the emails and about passwords and password managers you can use.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Latest Tactics Used By Cybercriminals To Bypass Traditional Email Security

--- 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/09/2019

Why Hackers Hack - Sextortion On The Rise And What To Do About It 

Jim Polito 0:01
Welcome back. He's here and thank God because the cyber criminals are out there. Still trying to get into your email. Well, how do you protect yourself? Well you start with this man, our Tech Talk guru Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir.

Craig Peterson 0:21
Hey, good morning, Jim.

Jim 0:22
How are you, buddy?

Craig 0:24
I'm doing great. We're just in a conference, in fact, out west and now I'm trying to get used to the time zone again, back and forth, back and forth. There's so much going on.

Jim 0:34
There is and they're relentless, the cyber criminals in wanting to get into your email every time some other patches put up or some other security measure, they figure a way around it. So what's the latest that they're doing? And what can we do about it?

Craig 0:50
Well, if you don't mind you, and let me let me explain something to the audience.

Jim 0:53
Explain, I like that. Explain.

Craig 0:58
Why are they doing it? And you get right down to it, you and I and everybody else around here. We're living here in this first world country. And we enjoy all kinds of things. At the conference, I spent some time with a few ladies from Zimbabwe and South Africa. And they're living there, this one lady is trying to help other women who are in abusive relationships there. Get out of that learn some skills. They make it $100 a month, in Zimbabwe. They do not have running water. Most of the days of the week the pipes are turned off, there's no water at all. They don't have the electricity that we have. It's just amazing. And they were just absolutely livid about what they called entitled, stupid people worried about everything from the type of plastic bag all the way on out.

Jim 2:03
Don't talk about plastic bags. You're going to get people upset.

Craig 2:10 
Total first world problems, okay, I'm helping them by getting some use computers together, cleaning them up, I'm gonna be doing some free training for them on cyber security. So consider that type of person. And then then you can move on to Eastern Europe where it's more than $100 a month that they're making but they're not making very much.

Jim 2:28 
They're not making very much.

Craig 2:31
So if they can somehow get their hands on your data, if they can, you know, these people aren't stupid. They're just in a bad financial circumstance. So if they can get their hands on your data, let's say one, one of my new clients had $100,000 taken out of their operating account, based on the technique we're going to talk about, okay. $100,000, and this was an Eastern European, that means they can not only support themselves for a year or two, but they can support their brothers, their sisters, their parents, their grandparents for a year or two. You know, the getting a $500 from someone is a huge win. Again, these women in Zimbabwe, that's five months worth of food and rent if they have to pay that. That's huge, huge money. So we're sitting here with our first world problems saying, well, why would anybody want to steal my credit card or my identity? Or get into my business bank account?

Craig 3:40
Well that's why. Think think of the motivation of these people and how many people there, they're going to be helping? So I had to say that because.

Jim 3:48
It makes sense. I'm glad I'm glad you gave that perspective, I mean, just about what they're dealing with. And and if they you know, it drives people to some things. Drive people to crime.

Craig 3:59
They absolutely do and we just don't realize it so much of the time zone, we have a very interesting conversation at dinner the night before last, with these ladies talking about what's going on. So when you were talking about here with email is absolutely huge. Because again, these are just bad guys. And they are trying to get some money out of you. And they're using some new strategies to get past these email security gateways. You know, you have some of the lower end ones that you might get from a Barracuda or an online site, and there's ways to get past them. And that's what we're talking about just for a minute here. I've had a lot of listeners, contact me with these sextortion scams. Know, I've got them as well, I don't know if you have. But what will happen with these sextortion scams, which is a type of blackmail, and right now it's making up 10% send of all of the spear phishing attacks and email, and that number is rising. And if your employees are more than twice as likely to be targeted blackmail, then standard business email compromise. And so here's what happened. They send an email that has in the subject line, security alerts type of message. They'll include your email address, or even your password in the subject line. And they'll say something like, Hey, you know, we have video of you on this porn site. And they'll give you a password. Now remember, Jim, we've talked many times about do not put your password out on, you know, the same password on multiple websites? 

Jim 5:52
Yeah. Because once they get one, they get the others. Yeah.

Craig 5:57
They've got them all because it's the same one. So they'll either put your email, your email address, they'll definitely put your password into these things. And now all of a sudden, you say, Oh, my gosh, what happened? And whether or not you were on that site, you're questioning now wait a minute, they've got my password? Well, of course they do. If you use the same password everywhere, of course they do. And we're seeing brand impersonation is huge. One out of three times a impersonate a financial institution.

Jim 6:34
And there is. Yeah.

Craig 6:35
There it is business email compromises and blackmail is on the rebound right now. So one of the most common ones is impersonating Microsoft and my dad fell victim to that one. Thank goodness, my mom called me and said, you know, your dad's  talking to someone on Microsoft technical support? And I'm not sure. You know, one in five is a financial institution, the majority them now are sextortion emails with a security alert, subject lines and more than 70% nowadays, are trying to establish some form of rapport. Hey, we're trying to help you.

Craig 7:17
Yeah, sense of urgency. And we're using name spoofing techniques. And it's getting past most of these lower end filters and gateways out there. So if you're a business person, and this is, you know, they're not all going to business email addresses, that's for sure. And they are not all coming from them either. Right now, the number one source of these sextortion and other emails, is Gmail. It's Google. Google's not even able to stop them from going out okay. Huge. So just stay ahead, you've got to have the right combination of the right technology, which isn't the cheap stuff, I'm afraid to say, you know. Look for something good look for Cisco's email firewalls. Look for the higher end ones. You know, even a Barracuda is better than nothing. Right? So have that, but also have training for your people. You know what, I'm going to dig up, there is a website that Google has put out, I've got the URL somewhere. I'll dig it out. I'll text it out to our listeners here later on today, once I figure it all out. But this is training. It's free, it takes five to 10 minutes, 15 minutes at the most. And what it does is it shows you on this website to type it asks for your name and email address, okay, now, they don't use it in marketing or anything. But the goal behind this is to embed it into these fake emails, they're going to show you they're not going to send them to you, they're just going to show you. And you'll see the email on a web browser, just like it will be showing up in your normal email client. And you can mouse over and over over so they teach you some techniques. And with what's going on right now, Jim, this is going to be a godsend. So I'll make sure I SMS them out. Probably this afternoon.

Jim 9:13
All right. And it will tell you at the end of the segment, how to get to that stuff. But it's very, very important. Craig, you've got I guess the real tip here is you've got to make different passwords for every single account. And you talked before about a password storage system to help people with that.

Craig 9:38
Right, exactly. So go into Jim's archives, and you'll find, here's what it is, okay, there's two password managers, I highly recommend. If you are a business user, absolutely use something called 1Password. So that's the digit one, followed by the word password, 1Password is the way to go. And it's absolutely phenomenal. And I've written this thing up about this, I'll try and send that out later today too. I'll try and send them both out. And then I use it for my family as well. But it does cost money to get the family options and to get the group options. And 1Password has multiple vaults so you can have a vault for your financial people, a vault for your marketing people, etc, etc. So I love that. And then the other one that is free, now 1Password does have free as well. Okay, just let me have all the advanced features which you don't need from normal, just normal use. LastPass is the other one. LastPass as in last password. And both of these tie into your web browsers, they'll create passwords, they will remember them, they work across all of your devices. It's huge. So start today. Change all your passwords and use one of these two password managers.

Jim 10:57
All right Craig big help. Craig Peterson everybody. Now here's how you get all this information. This is how I know this stuff. And you'll be in on it too. Text my name, Jim, to this number.

Craig 11:12
855-385-5553. So just text the word Jim to 855-385-5553 along with any questions you might have.

Jim 11:26
Standard data and text rates apply. Craig will not sell your name to somebody, he won't hack you. This is all free. There's there's nothing, nothing you need to do about it. It's all free and he won't pester you with incessant messages but he will alert you when something big happens and tell you what you need to do. Craig excellent segment. Thank you so much for the time.

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Apr 6, 2019

Cloud and Cloud computing is in the news and we'll talk about what is going on and what to expect

Do you sell things online off a website?  If so, you have to listen in to find out what the IRS is doing, right now, it's going to drive you crazy.

It's update time! Microsoft is out with their April update, known as 1903 or 19h1. It has some nice Windows Update policy features.

What are Cybercriminals up to now?  They are using new tactics that bypass traditional email security, So listen in to find out more

It's bad enough that cybercriminals are attacking us and stealing out information but now these Bad guys are stealing money right out of bank accounts.

Do you know what a Denial-of-Service or a Distributed Denial-of-Service attacks are?  Well, the FBI and Secret Service trying to shut down criminal organizations who are using them in a big way, we'll talk about what they are doing today.

Are you a C-level executive? It is time to remove your cybersecurity blinders -- Cybersecurity is no longer an IT problem it is a boardroom level problem and scary one when you get right down to it.  Cybercriminals are using brand impersonation now and it's it costing companies a lot of money 

For all this and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/06/2019

FBI Shuts Down Denial Of Service Attacks - Supreme Court Ruling Will Affect Every Business

Craig Peterson 0:00  
Hey, hello, everybody, Craig Peterson here. And it looks like my math was wrong. You know, last week I said, I thought we were coming up to the 1,000th week of being on the air. Actually, we weren't coming up on it, it was the 1000th week. So this is our One Thousand and One weeks of broadcasting, and this week, we're going to have a few different radio appearances, as I usually do all be on with Jack Heath on Monday, but because I'm going to be busy this week, as well, actually, I guess, this week? No, I'm not going to be on with Jack on Monday. But I am going to be on on other stations Tuesday and Wednesday. Okay. So anyhow, we passed 1000 weeks, you can do the math, that's a lot of years on the air. I don't know if that makes me old. It's certainly kind that makes me feel old. But you guys, man, I appreciate you. I appreciate everyone who listens, and everyone who subscribes to my podcast. And you can do that quite easily by going to http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. Leave a comment. Hopefully, I've earned a five star from you guys. And that'll help get the show out so more people are aware of it.

Craig 1:26
So let's get right into the articles this week. as is true every week, I send these things out on Saturday morning. So you should get my show notes-newsletter, and that'll keep you up to date. Let you know about the latest security problems that have arisen this last week and other things in the tech biz and tech world that I think are interesting. So number one this week is from Infosecurity Magazine. And it's talking about cloud and cloud computing, we'll get to that in a few minutes. The U.S, man, if you have a website, if you're selling things online, you got to hear what the IRS is doing right now.

Craig 2:08
And man, the internet tax stuff, it's going to drive you crazy. There is a new update here for Windows coming on. Well, it's the April update. And it's known as version 1903 or 19h1.

Craig 2:26
But it's going to have a new Windows Update policy. And it's going to let you if you are a big organization that is using the group policy editor, basically, you have an Active Directory server and you have group policies for your various accounts.

Craig 2:46
Excuse me, this, the policy is supposed to allow you now to specify deadlines for automatic updates, and restarts. Now if you don't have the Windows 10 professional, you're kind of stuck as it is right now because you can not, I repeat, can not specify when you want updates to be applied and how long you might want to wait. And we've certainly talked about that on the show before. But it's going to give IT admins a lot more control, especially when managing larger fleets really of devices, number of Windows devices, so it should be pretty good. And I have some details on where you'll find it in the menus there on my website at http://CraigPeterson.com. And Softpedia has really quite a nice little thing about the whole thing. But basically, you as an admin can set a deadline for installing updates as high as 30 days. Usually, I recommend about seven days, five to seven days, because that lets you get past the initial problems that often accompany these updates from our friends at Microsoft. And the auto reboot can be anywhere from zero to seven days following that.

Craig 4:08
Now, this feature is something that was available only in the pro
version. And now it's available across the board if you are using group policies, okay? The latest tactics used by cybercriminals will talk about this. And this is bypassing traditional email security.

Craig 4:27
And where do most IT professionals feel vulnerable when it comes to bad guys and attacks and stealing our information, stealing money literally right out of bank accounts. Well, we'll talk about that too. But first, I want to get to an article I love the title of this. This is out of the UK, it's from The Register. It's called Silence of the WANs, which I thought was just very clever. The FBI has been working hard to shut down criminal organizations, so has the Secret Service. I've talked with both of them before about what they're doing and how effective they have been. And one of the problems we talked about in my cybersecurity course, was something called a denial of service attack and distributed denial of service attack. And we talked about how to prevent them, how to stop them, and how to make your life so much easier. And we, of course, concluded that class, it's not open, you can't get into it right now, because I'm not conducting it right now. But denial of service attacks is absolutely huge. And the FBI just busted a massive attack and network about two weeks ago.

Craig 5:45
And this was just amazing. Because the traffic loads plummeted after the FBI took these guys out. And some of them were right here in the US. You think most of the time that there may be in Russia or, you know, some Eastern European country, maybe India, you know, the normal places these things come from. But the December of 2018, the FBI really started pushing trying to figure out who was running the distributed denial of service attacks. Now, here's what how a DOS works, the denial of service attack.

Craig 6:25
Someone, usually it's either a competitor or more often, it's someone that disagrees with your company. So a company that maybe has some sort of a political stance or donated to a charity that somebody doesn't like, they will start sending dozens, hundreds, thousands of requests to a web server, this is just a simple explanation, okay. So they'll send all of these to the web server, the web server becomes overloaded. It may crash or may not crash doesn't really matter. But because it has so many requests coming in, it cannot serve the normal users. So, people who are coming to your website to find out more about you may be to place an order, maybe to get some of the information that you're providing, they cannot get there because of the denial of service attack that's going on. Well, there is a worse type of denial of service attack, and it's called a distributed denial of service attack. Because bottom line, if there's only one machine that's attacking you, it's pretty darn easy to put a filter in place to block that machine from getting to you. That makes sense, right? Well, if you have 100, or thousand machines that are all sending data to you becomes much more difficult to stop. And that's the whole idea behind distributed denial of service attacks.

Craig 7:55
So they FBI worked with a mitigation provider called Nexusguard. And they've been tracking this stuff. And they're saying both the overall number of attacks and the volume of the data fired at the targets to overwhelm them is down and it's measurably down because the FBI wiped out 15 of these denials of service mercenary sites. Some of them are run in America, some of them are run overseas, but they allowed people to purchase the temporary use of the massive button that's of compromised devices. Right? Isn't that what I'm always warning you guys about? That's part of the reason you got to keep his machine safe. Because millions of machines have been compromised. They have remote controllers on them. The owners of the machines just aren't aware of this because they're not paying any attention to security. And then they hire your machine now to use to attack a third party. They use your machine to mine for Bitcoin to make money for them. They use your machine to distribute kiddie porn, pictures and videos of Americans being beheaded. Okay, how many times we have to talk about this everybody? So these massive botnets were in turn commanded to create massive loads of network traffic and targeted websites and different types of services, which ultimately overload them and knock some offline. 

Craig 9:27
Now, it seems according to The Register that these 15 denial-of-service groups were so prolific that simply taking them offline has caused a noticeable drop in global activity for the entire fourth quarter of 2018. We're talking about an estimate from the FBI of more than 300,000 attacks over the last five years from these guys. And Nexusguard is saying the number of attacks fell by 11%. And the size of each attack, which is the low directed at the target took a nosedive with the average rate dropping 85% and the maximum size down 24% from a year previous to that. So that's really good. The huge dip and attacks may not last, because it's so easy to set up a botnet because so many people haven't properly secured their computers, okay. And somebody else is going to come along and take over, fill in that void. There's going to be nude and distributed denial of services for higher services popping up.

Craig 10:33
Many of these Internet of Things (IoT) devices are now being used for botnets. So you're smart light there on the factory floor that isn't properly secured, are not only being used to attack you and get the information from your servers. But they're also being used now too, to a direct these denial-of-service attacks. The number of these IoT devices that are used in the amplification attacks, which is a specific type, but they were up over 3,000% from last year and their accounting for more than half of all the taxing in the last quarter of 2018. So again, you know, we covered this in detail in the DIY cybersecurity, make sure you segment your network, if you have IoT devices, make sure they cannot get out of your network, except to the control nodes, the legitimate ones, right?

Craig 11:34
The ones that are for the manufacturer to make sure they get security upgrades. And make sure you do the security updates, make sure they get the security updates, make sure it's all working. Because it's no longer you buy a light bulb from the local Home Depot store for a buck and plug it in. And you don't ever look at that light bulb again until it burns out.

Craig 11:57
Now with the Internet of Things who the smart bulbs in the smart everything, you know, thermostats, any of this stuff, those smart devices now are your responsibility. It's just like a friend of mine, who we've been providing DNS services to for 20 years, probably 15, 20 years, well, more than 20 years. And he called us up he says, Hey, listen, why aren't you guys providing DNS for us anymore, you know, from my little network. And we were and we dug into it. And we found out guess what?

Craig 12:32
His home address block that was assigned to him by in this case he has Comcast was used to access the dark web. Yeah, pretty big deal.

Craig 12:50
And so now he's running around trying to figure out why now we have automatic systems in place that saw, wait a minute, the side dark web block. So all of our stuff worked perfectly. It was great. And that's how we protect our customer's websites. And that's how we set up the networks for all of our customers. Just automatic. If it's not automatic. It's not going to happen, right? So we had automatically blocked him now he's trying to figure out why what IoT device, what light switch whatever, went out to the dark web, and was being used as a tor exit point, even. It's crazy. It's crazy what's happening. So make sure you know what you're doing, find some good courses, whether they're mine or somebody else's, and understand how to do this. And I have free master classes that we're offering from time to time, make sure you're on my email list, http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe. That way, you'll get my show notes, you'll also get some of the more urgent alerts that come out. And I'll let you know about the free master classes and other training that I'm doing. Okay. So http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe, and keep listening to this radio show. Because I do get stuff out here. Although, you know, when you talk about master classes, they can go easily an hour, hour and a half or even longer, you know, the courses can take you six weeks to get through. But you know, stay up to date, do the right thing. 

Craig 14:24
Now, let's talk about the number one problem that IT security professionals are looking at right now. 91%, this is according to Insider Threats, 91% of it and security professionals feel vulnerable to insider threats. And 75% believe the biggest risks lie in cloud applications like popular file storage, email solutions. You know, we talked about them before, they're worried about the Dropbox, Gmail, Google Drive, OneDrive. All of those things, right. So it is very, very concerning to IT professionals. And it's, you know, 91% of them being worried about the insider threats is huge. And that's why again, I have included in the DIY cybersecurity course, a whole set of policies and procedures that can go into the HR manuals as well as things that you should be doing in your business. Now BetterCloud surveyed nearly 500 IT network security professionals, and you can find this online. It's called The State of Insider Threats in the Digital Workspace 2019. So here are the key findings amongst again IT network security professionals, nearly all of them surveyed, 91%, feel vulnerable to insider threats. And that means things like people opening an email clicking on the wrong link, maybe doing something malicious because I got fired they got a bad review. Right. Those are all insider threats. 62% of them believe the biggest security threat comes from the well-meaning but negligent end user. That number fits in with other stats I've seen solids probably pretty legit. 75% believe the biggest risks lie in cloud storage and email solutions, which is really big. And I'm going to talk about an email security article here in a minute and about how the cybercriminals are changing their tactics. 46% of IT leaders which means, you know, the IT managers and above believe that the rise of software-as-a-service applications makes them the most vulnerable. And man, I'm seeing that all of the time, especially in regulated industries. And we're helping out some of these health care providers and legal and public companies. Man, they're using SaaS, software as a service. In other words, caught applications like that going on style, and they're not checking them. We've even done audits on restaurant chains, just small local chains, and found incredible liability that they're facing. 40% of them believe they're most vulnerable to exposure of confidential business information. That's financial information, customer list, personally identifiable information. And only 26% of C level executives say they've invested enough to mitigate the risk of insider threats, versus 44% of IT managers.

Craig 17:31
So in other words, the C level executives are running around with blinders on. Kind of scary isn't it when you get right down to it. So let's get into the latest tactics that are being used by the cybercriminals to bypass email security. And I've got this article up again on http://CraigPeterson.com and this is from Industry News. And they're saying that cybercriminals are using brand impersonation now in 83% of spear phishing attacks. Now, remember, these types of phishing attacks against businesses called business email compromise is kind of a general term to cover most of them. 83% of the time, this is what's used, and it's already accounting for about a little more than $12 billion worth of stolen funds, not wasted time, not cost to recovery, right. $12 billion in stolen funds. In the last couple of years according to the FBI, on the worldwide statistics. It is huge.

Craig 18:37
One in three of the spear phishing attacks is launched from Gmail accounts.

Craig 18:47
20% of them occur on Tuesdays. About 20% on Wednesday, 20% on Thursday, and it drops off to 5% on the weekends, with the slightly lower numbers on Mondays and Fridays. So no big surprise there. I've had people contact me, just texting me, you know, my 855-385-5553 number about these extortion scams. I've gotten one or two of them myself. And I know you guys have gotten them because you've contacted me, you've texted me about it. And and I've gone back and forth to kind of explain what's going on. But still sextortion scams, these are a form of blackmail. And right now it's making up about 10% of all spear phishing attacks. And it's expected to increase even more because it is on an increasing line right now. And employees are also twice as likely to be the target of blackmail, than of a business email compromise. So, that's a change from last year. And this is from a report released by Barracuda and it's called Spearphishing Top Threats and Trends if you want to look it out. And they looked at about 360,000 spear phishing emails.

Craig 20:08
So let's get some closer look here. Impersonating Microsoft is one of the more common techniques used by hackers to try and take over accounts, financial institutions. Impersonating nearly one in five attacks. Finance department employees are heavily targeted in obviously banks and other financial institutions as well. Majority of subject lines on sextortion emails contain some form of security alert attackers often include victims email address or password. Subject lines on more than 70% of the business email compromise attacks are trying to establish rapport, sense of urgency. Scammers are using name spoofing techniques, which they've used for years, changing the display name on Gmail and other employee accounts to make it look like it's coming from a company employee. So here's the top subject lines and number the two top 54% say security alert and 34% say change password. Okay. Very big deal. You'll see this article up on my website. And we'll have to try and do a master class on this one because I think this is important for people. I'm going to set these two aside and I'll let you know any anyone who's on my email list. I'll let you know about it. These are always free, will do a deeper dive into it.

Craig 21:30
Make sure you subscribe http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe if you haven't already. The US according to Forbes magazine has stepped up its tax collections here. And if you're selling software in the US, you've got a whole new problem coming your way, you know that we've had for a long time now, protection from the federal government saying the local authorities state and local cannot tax internet sales. And it has expanded a bit you've had massive companies like Amazon, who said yeah, we'll pay sales tax, state and local. And if you ask me, the reason they're doing that is to stomp the little guy into the ground. And the reason I say that is Amazon can deal with it. There are estimated to be over 9,000 different tax regulating entities in the United States. 9,000 of them. You have to comply with all of these 9000 across the board. How can you use a small business so that you can't, right? Amazon can. Well, there are going to be companies that are popping up there already are a few of them out there right now that are trying to take care of this problem for you where they'll collect all of the taxes.

Craig 22:56
And what it is resulting in, however, is many businesses is saying listen with all the European Union rules. They've got their GAFA rules are cooking up right now> GAFA, gaffer standing for Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon tax.

Craig 23:10
It's a kind of a VAT tax and supply, it's not supply driven. It's crazy. But there is a decision from the Supreme Court last year about a dispute between Wayfair now this is that online furniture company and the State of South Dakota and South Dakota wanted to collect taxes and Wayfair said no don't need to sell the Supreme Court overturned a law on not taxing companies with no physical presence in the taxing state. Because that legally is called legal nexus. So if you had operations in New Hampshire, you had to, well New Hampshire is a bad example, because we have no income tax. And we have no sales tax. Okay. But let's say you're in Massachusetts, which is a terrible state when it comes to taxes. You're in Massachusetts, if you sell something to someone in Mass., you have to click Mass. taxes. And if you sell something to someone in another state, you didn't necessarily have to collect the tax as well. Now you are going to. Any company selling online, this is more than just software companies, it's going to hit businesses across the board. And it's going to hit you hard.

Craig 24:25
Okay. South Dakota, has rules that say if you have more than 200, individual sales, or more than a hundred thousand revenues, there are other states that say more than 100 sales, or 50,000 in revenue, some of them have 4.7%, some of them have as much as 13.5%, and the thresholds for spending in the state span from 100,000 and $500,000. And there might be 100 transactions a year it might be 500 and might be 2000 transactions a year. Whoa, okay. This is going to be a huge burden. 52 new tax codes on the individual states plus sir taxes that are introduced by counties, by cities, not just in the US, but 30 countries in Europe, along with Australia, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Norway, India, the list just goes on and on. Hundreds of countries. More than a hundred out there. And US states have highlighted software in SaaS products as explicitly liable for sales tax. So remember too that we're talking about different taxes and different tax rates. You look in Massachusetts, they have a different tax rate for different types of IT services, they have different rates for software as a service in different categories, this is going to be a nightmare. So there's companies out there like Avalara and TaxJar that will outsource and take care of a lot of this stuff for you. Many companies are saying "forget about it." I know companies in Canada that are just pulling their hair out just dealing with Canadian tax codes.

Craig 26:10
And many of them are just saying forget it, I'll just wait for the bill to come from the tax collector basically. So rather than charging you the appropriate sales tax, they fill out the state's forms that cross your fingers that they collected enough from you that they had enough in revenue to pay that state sales taxes.

Craig 26:29
This is why the federal government passed a law saying no internet sales taxes because it will be a nightmare. Now, it is going to help local small businesses because now they're going to compete on a more even footing where they have to collect the sales tax. So do the bigger companies, right? And so to the people, even small guys who are selling online, and it's going to help companies like eBay and Amazon, where you just sell your product on one of those sites veil worry about all of the sales tax and collecting that. And they'll take their cut and just pass it back to you. So yeah, well, this is going to be big. It's in. You heard it here first. Thank you, Supreme Court.

Craig 27:18
Anyhow, I hope you enjoyed today's show. You can read all of these articles plus the ones I missed today, including cloud adoption and what IT pros are concerned about. This 2019 state of enterprise cloud container adoption security that was published here recently, all of that in this morning's newsletter. If you didn't get it, make sure you get the future ones. http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe, and I will keep you up to date and you can find out about this and, of course, a whole lot more. I have now thousands of articles I published up there my website, because we're over a thousand shows right now was this show 1001 weekly.

Craig 28:02
This is week 1001, not show 1001. Man, that's a lot of the time on the air. Anyhow, thanks for listening. Make sure you subscribe, http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe and have a great week. Talk to you next week. Bye-bye

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Related articles:

Windows 10 April 2019 Update Introduces a New Windows Update Policy

Latest Tactics Used By Cybercriminals To Bypass Traditional Email Security

Cloud Adoption On The Rise, It Pros Unsure Of Risk

The US Has Stepped Up Its Tax Game. You Will Want To Read This If You’re Selling Online

Most IT And Security Professionals Feel Vulnerable To Insider Threats

Silence Of The Wans: FBI DDoS-For-Hire Takedowns Slash Web Flood Attacks ‘By 11%’

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Apr 1, 2019

If there was a proven way to predict at what age you will die, would you like to know it? Craig is on with Jack Heath and Justin talking about the AI predicting the lifespan of patients. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

Health Industry Is Using Artificial Intelligence To Predict When Someone Will Die With Unsettling Accuracy

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 04/01/2019

Artificial Intelligence Predicting Lifespan

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here. I had a discussion this morning with Mr. Jack Heath about this new artificial intelligence that they put together and tested over in the UK. And it really is concerning with all of our talk here about socialized medicine, Medicaid, Medicare for all, all of these government sponsored health care programs. What does it mean to you, particularly as you get a little bit older? So here we go with Mr. Jack Heath.

Jack Heath 0:34
Joining us now some Tech Talk on this April Fools. So that means all what Craig Peterson is going to say is serious, including artificial intelligence. Good morning, Craig.

Craig 0:44
Yeah, this is this is definitely not a April 1st kind of type of joke. I was just talking about Justin and I said, you know, I couldn't come up with one this morning. You know, the reality is just so unreal. Why do you need to come up with something fake?

Jack  1:02
Well, that's what some of the posts are this morning is that the news is so surreal at some point. What's going on in parts of the world or this cut, you know, you look at Great Britain, what's going on in Parliament over the Brexit. You look at Venezuela, you look at the migrant crisis, you look at politics of the day, who needs any April Fools, right?

Craig 1:19
Yeah, absolutely. And the article this morning that you're talking about that, of course, is up on my website, as well and NBC has been reporting on is talking about these artificial intelligence programs that are being designed and nowadays to do a number of different things. Now, you mentioned that they are significantly more accurate than predictions delivered by pretty much anyone, including the doctors in predicting how long someone will live. And this is a study that was done over in Britain as well, at the National Institute of Health. And, of course, they have death panels over there. And you know, they will call them that, but it's socialized medicine, they want to know, is it worth spending money on someone? Or should they just not bother spending the money because they're going to die fairly soon. And you know, it's just not worth putting money into old people. That is not an April Fool's joke. That is what they're trying to do. And they found that they could get their programs, these algorithms, identifying 76% of the time when a subject was going to die. It was in. Yeah, Isn't that crazy? But there's good things to they're using AI now, it's better at spotting skin cancer than most doctors are early signs of Alzheimer's disease, onset of autism in six months old, six months old now.

Jack 2:46
I'm not surprised the advances in technology. Amazing. But you know, you've heard of sometimes to know if you've heard of, and Justin, genetic screening, or some families are signing up for this. So say a family has a history, some cancer or heart disease. And you know, you could do this genetic screening, and they can kind of forecast. But I guess I guess it would be good to know, but can I ask you a question? Would you really want to know? 

Justin 3:07
Hell yeah.

Jack 3:07
You would?

Justin 3:08 
Let me know what I can do to avoid it.

Jack 3:10
Well avoid it. But what if it was inevitable? I mean, what if you, I'm being hypothetical, but what if something said, well, chances are 90% chance that by this date and this age, you'll probably be passed away? I don't know if I'd want to know that.

Justin 3:23 
Oh I would. Let me go skydiving. Let me go hit the casino. Let me do all that stuff. Right Craig?

Craig 3:28 
You know you do want to prepare for that though. You know, bottom line. And we've had for a long time, this is not a new problem, a long time people have known Hey, listen, you you have this major history is probably best that you don't have children and many people, many couples have gone without children for that very reason.

Jack 3:45
The other thing is, and I know you tend to rely on the science and, you know, the technology side of things Craig Peterson, check out Craig Peterson with an O-N.com Craig. It's not always a perfect science. Sometimes they get this stuff wrong. So imagine going through one these tests or something and being told, well, you're probably not gonna live much beyond 59 or 60 years old, then all of a sudden you get to be 72. Oops, we were wrong in that one.

Craig 4:11
Oops. Sorry about that. And that's bound to happen, especially with some of the newer technologies. And it really concerns me, jack, when you've got the National Health System in a country using it to predict when the patients are going to die, and using that to ration health care. Because again, it may have been 77% accurate, but when you get right down to it, is it accurate because they've decided to remove care from some of these patients, and so that it's become predictive in a very negative way.

Jack 4:45
Yeah. All right, Craig, good stuff. Check it out. Craig Peterson, of course Tech Talk airs on our Saturday mornings on these iHeart News talk stations. Thank you, Craig. Take care.

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