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Jul 20, 2019

I am on a soapbox today about the politics of climate, so listen in.

My take on how the government stifles technology innovation for most of us and why.

More on climate coming out of NASA concerning solar cycles and how they point at a coming Ice Age.  Did you hear about this? Listen in

Do you use Cash, me too. But I am going to address the dangers of a cashless society.

 

I am planning a Security Summer for my listeners.  I will have some free courses.  I will also introduce you to some of the software that I use for my clients and how you can use it too.  Also, I have some limited opportunities for businesses who have had enough with their security issues to work with me and my team and put their security problems to rest once and for all.   So watch out for announcements on those.

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript: 

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/20/2019

The Politics of Climate Change, Government and why it Stifles Technology, NASA and the Coming Ice Age, the Dangers of a Cashless Society   

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Hello, everybody. You know, I'm getting fed up with some of this. I don't know about you, but it's just driving me crazy. If you got my newsletter, this morning, you know. Hopefully, you got my email this morning. And I know now I'm trying to send it out when it's most convenient for you to so some people might not get it until Monday. It all depends on when you are typically opening and responding to my emails or send an automated message to me. You know its this whole machine learning which is the first step towards AI, artificial intelligence. That's what we're using now. The entire idea is to make this more convenient for everybody. Okay, this has me so frustrated, politics, right? We've got the left with the whole green thing, right. It's just part of their drive toward socialism in an attempt to take over everything and increase their power and authority.

After all you and me, we are only regular people, we all care about the environment. I've never met anyone nor even heard of anyone who wants to destroy the environment.

We all want to be comfortable. We all want to pass on a world that's better than the world we inherited to our children. There's not a soul that doesn't. I don't know anybody that is in that boat. The left, the socialists, have glommed on to this whole "green agenda thing." If you ask me it's an attempt to take over control of part of the government. It's all part of the power and control. It's like Hillary Clinton, the smartest woman who ever lived and who knew more than any of us. They're better than us, and they should have control of everything.

Wouldn't you agree? I'm sure there's some listening now that don't agree with me. Right. We have a lot of great people who are left-wingers because they've got great heart, right. However, we've got to look at the real motivations behind what's happening. Why are businesses doing what they're doing? We talked about that all the time, right, about the overreach of companies and data mining. They are using it for marketing. Then the bad guys come in and take it much further. So I'm, I'm critical of big business. I'm critical of the Trump administration, and I've been critical of every administration when they did things that I thought were not in the best interest of the people.

I don't want you to think I'm some right-wing wacko, because I'm not. I'm somewhat libertarian, and I'm in the middle, frankly, of everybody that's out there if anybody was in the middle of the libertarians, because we agree with some things democrats do and some things republicans do. But ultimately, I don't trust big anything. When you're talking about big government, big business or anything big you're talking about a real distortion of motivations. Big church, there's a distortion of motives, look at what's happened with the Catholic Church. And I'm not picking on them, right. It's every church out there every organized religion, look at what's happened with you name it, Eastern religions, Western religions, they take on a life of their own. The same things are true with businesses, and big business is the same thing. It is true with government. They are the worst, right? They have the guns, the money and the lawyers behind them. Ultimately, they're the ones that put a gun to your head and say, you will do this because if you don't, you go to jail. Right now they're not doing the horrific things to us, you know, solitary confinement is pretty darn horrible. But you know, they're not torturing us here in the Western world, physically torturing us trying to break us down mentally, the way they still do, and some of these Middle East countries out there. But what frustrates me is when we're talking about politics, entering the realm of something that should be common sense and science. And that's what this whole so-called green thing is. That's what the socialists have been doing. They couldn't get their way with the way they were doing things before. So now it's all about the green. I'm going to talk about green PACs. I think that's, somewhat ironic, right?

I'm talking about their so-called Green agenda, where their friends who are making electric cars are going to be the winners, their friends that are making solar panels are going to be the winners, their friends, who are making these windmills to generate electricity are going to be the winners. They're not going to allow the free market to decide who's the winner. What's the best technology out there?
Hydrogen fuel cells the best?
Is internal combustion the best?
What's the best alternative?
Synthetic fuels?
What's the best?
We will never know because the government has stepped in before the market could decide? Look at the corn look at the ethanol that they're putting into our gasoline. It is easily provable. How harmful it has been to our environment. But who, who makes the ethanol? Where does it come from, the corn growers in Iowa. A State that the politicians who are running for President for political office need to impress. A State they want to win over on to their side. So yeah, look at all the ethanol, look at how we've helped with the farmers in Iowa. Now, we've got all this ethanol, and we're burning our food.

We've got subsidies. You remember Solyndra look at Elon Musk with what's been happening with his cars. Tesla has received it's estimated around $3 billion worth of government money. Is that a crazy amount? You look at this worldwide, my I have a daughter living in Norway, and she's helping to design the next generation of ships. In Norway, if you buy a Tesla, you get a 25% savings. The government is financing 25% of the purchase price. Yeah, it's something to we will look forward to, Right. So they are getting subsidies in Norway through here, where we're giving them hard-earned money, you and me the taxpayers. It is us who are busting our butts supporting these people out in Silicon Valley and elsewhere, that are getting government subsidies, taxpayer money, look at what just happened with Amazon. Amazon is looking for another area for a corporate headquarters. We have all these states and cities saying, hey, we'll give you tax breaks. Well, that's another form of a subsidy.

Think about all the things that the government supports through subsidies like Solyndra, battery technologies, solar panel companies, and installers, the windmills. None of them have to compete on an even footing with the rest of the technologies out there. How many just phenomenal, world-changing technologies got buried because they couldn't get off the ground? How can you compete with someone that has $3 billion, effectively in subsidies when you're trying to get a business off the ground? You can't. It drives me nuts when this happens. Now we hear about all about global warming? Well if you are as old as I am you remember, in the 70s. On the cover of Time magazine said we're in for another Ice Age so, the environmental scientists came up with a plan to pour black soil on the polar ice caps to absorb more solar heat preventing a mini ice age. Of course, that didn't materialize. Then it was, well, how can we use and see people, everybody cares about the environment. So let's do this, let's call this green because everybody wants to save the environment. No one doesn't want to have a great atmosphere, right, which is not what I was saying earlier. So we'll use that to gain more control over people will be able to tell people what to do, and how to do it, because they're too stupid to be able to do this themselves. And there's you'll find tons of information about that online. You know, slips of the tongue, things that people the Obama administration said, things that happened with these researchers, where their emails were exposed, where they were fabricating the so-called science of global warming. That one failed on them, right. Now its global climate change. We've to do something about climate change. Now. I agree. I do. We'll you might think, Wow, Craig, wait a minute. Where are these ideas coming from? Here's what I agree with, we should be looking at this, we should be concerned about this, but don't knee jerk. We don't have enough data and the data that we have is badly tainted, as has been proven by these emails and notes from the researchers that are researching it, severely corrupted.

Now, we've got the media that refuses to report anything contrary to the socialists talking points. (Socialists being those to the left to of the Democrat Party). Or anything that isn't in line with their education in school. If you want to see some craziness, have a look at some of the campus reforms videos out there. Reporters go out, and they give a quote to the students, and the students read the quote and say, well, that's because Trump's a misogynist, a racist, etc. Then the reporter shows them a little video of who the quote was from and then all of a sudden, they just, it was, wow, I didn't think that was the case. Right? They're not researching. They're not thinking they're stuck in a paper bag known as gaslighting. A study came out last month that I bet you have not heard of This is a study from NASA. I bet you won't hear about this anywhere else, frankly. I'm looking right now at NASA's website, science dot NASA dot gov. There is an article from them. It is being reported, but not in the general news circles that the solar minimum is coming. NASA is predicting that the Dalton minimum levels of the sun's radiation.

Now, for some reason, I heard somewhere that the sun might have an impact on the temperature on the Earth. Right? I know It sounds stupid to say that, but today many people are convinced that man is the cause of the temperature increases.

Sorry to pop your bubble, but Earth temperatures fluctuate. And, they have for thousands upon thousands of years.

Earth has had higher carbon dioxide levels in its atmosphere, and it has had higher temperatures than we have now.

Think about this. If it were hotter, and we had higher carbon dioxide levels, we would have more food, and there would be denser vegetation.

Everything would be healthier.

A month ago, June 18, this article came out, here's what's happening. The Earth is an approaching grand solar minimum. As I mentioned, NASA is predicting this right now. And this came from a researcher with the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at NASA's Ames Research Center. These researchers have come up with a new way of looking at sunspots using direct observations of the magnetic fields that are emerging on the surface of the sun. That data has only existed for the last four solar cycles (44 years). They used three different sources of sun observations. They looked at these cosmic cycles, which are about 11 years long.

There are longer cycles, as well, which our green movement friends seem to forget conveniently. These researchers used these to forecast the strength and timing of maximum solar cycles. It was determined using data from 2000 and again in 2008 to predict the solar cycle coming to an end this year. The next solar cycle is going to start in 2020. Guess what? She was dead-on. So, now, here's what is worrying because this is pure scientific research, not the crap that they keep feeding you on the news, it is the stuff that you're not hearing about even though it's been out for more than a month. It is a reality. And the truth is forecasting a return to what's called the dalton minimum which occurred from 1792-1830.

Now NASA is not predicting and not even telling you what happened during the Dalton minimum event.

Here's what happened. Brutal cold, crop loss, famine, war, and powerful volcanic eruptions. Because you remember the sun's magnetic field, which is what part of what she measures one of these three measurements affects us here on Earth. Just look at the northern lights to get an idea but yeah, maybe there is an effect from the solar emissions that are hitting the Earth. So Germany had an what was called the overclock station, and it experienced to two centigrade two degrees centigrade. So give or take five degrees decline over 20 years, devastated Germany's food production. Then in the US even we had a year without summer 1816, and it was caused by this, again, solar minimum, combined with the after-effects of the second-largest volcanic eruption in a thousand years. Mount Tambora was on April 10, 1815. So we had some battles going on during this time, the Napoleonic Wars and the Battle of Waterloo. That occurred June 18, 1815, when the Duke of Wellington defeated Napoleon. Sixty-five thousand men died at that battle. Wow. They were preoccupied with this. There wasn't a whole lot of coverage about the entire Dalton Minimum that was happening at the time.

So let's go to some records and back then. In June, this from a resident of Virginia, another snowfall came, and folks went slain. On the Fourth of July water froze in cisterns and snow fell again. With Independence Day celebrations moving inside churches where hearth fires warm things a might. Clothes froze on the clothesline in New England. Northwestern Pennsylvania reported ice in ponds and on lakes in both July and August. Virginia had frost in August. The price of oats from 1815 to 1816 increased almost eightfold. Here are some other stories from around the world. The potato crop in Ireland rotted in the ground resulting in widespread starvation.

In England, France, and Germany, wheat crops failed, leading to bread shortages, food riots, and looting. Northern China got walloped with thousands of people starving to death. Southern Asia experienced torrential rains that triggered a cholera epidemic that killed many more. The year 1816 earned a nickname. It was called "800 and froze to death." We've got the politicians out there arguing about whether or not we should have ethanol in our gasoline, whether or not we should be giving another subsidy to Tesla. We are staring at what NASA is predicting, in this next solar cycle, or the one immediately after, as summer that will never come. Now we've heard about "Oh my gosh, temperatures have gone up a little over one degree Celsius." But that is in the last 50 years and those numbers, by the way, are very controversial. And there's ample evidence suggesting that they are not valid. Right now, We have an icebreaker that was that up in the northern waters of the Arctic Circle that was expecting to have full passage all the way through. Did you read about that? There is a new north passage except it is covered in ice and completely frozen now. However, we do not hear the truth all because of politics.

There's a lot of yelling and screaming going on. There's a lot of first-world problems, where we're taking the blame for things that we have no control over. And yet the reality is not that it is not being addressed which frustrates me to no end. It frustrates me to no end. Look at this, wow, we're almost out of time. Hopefully, this was informative to you. You know, my friends on the left and I know you're listening, and my friends on the right, I know you are listening, too. We need to stop the political bickering.

We have to solve the problems that are facing us right now. We have to get together. Congress needs to work with our President, not stonewall and yell and scream against everything the President suggests. There are some things legitimately the federal government can do, which in my estimation is to downsize itself. We have some serious problems out there we don't even have time to talk about today. Now, if you don't get my weekly newsletter, you got to get it because I never have time to get to everything here on the radio. Go to Craig Peterson dot com. There is a little subscribe box at the top, I'm asking for your name and email.

I am not an internet marketer that's nailing you all of the time. Okay, I do have offers, like my security summer summit coming up in a couple of weeks. It's free, it's going to be probably a four-week course at this point, as time slides, and it's gone from six weeks down to about four weeks. In it, there will be multiple sessions every week, and I'm going to try and keep them short. It's on the brass tacks of security, what can you do to meet the Mainstream Security Standard. We will cover what do you need to do for your home or your business. Make sure you sign up for that. You'll also get the newsletter every week when we get them out. I think we got this down now. So you'll be getting the newsletter every week that has all of these articles and more so that you can stay up to date on the most important things out there — the most critical security and tech news. That's where I focus because that's what I do for my clients. A shout out by the way to Rich and Sue, who are new clients this week we're helping them with all of their security. If you have security requirements, make sure you let me know because we can help you out with that too. Whether it's DFARS, HIPAA, or PCI or you want to keep your data safe, so you can sleep at night. Again, Let me know. You can email me with your questions, and you can text me, it's just: me at Craig Peterson dot com, I always answer them, you might have to wait a few days or a week. But I will get back to you. I still do a little research if I need to. So that can sometimes take a bit longer and send you the information that you need to answer your questions. You can text me at any time. And that's simple as opening your phone if you got a question or comment or you want to make sure you get into our security summer, text me. It's simple. It's 855-385-5553, standard data and text rates apply.

I'll answer a lot of these questions on the air because if you have it at least 100 other people who are listening, that have the same question. So I will, frequently, talk about it right here. That's where I get a lot of these articles from, from you guys. So you can text me your question anytime. 855-385-5553 and I can help you out. We can do a cyber health assessment for you, you know this, I do so many things for free. And I do that because I care.

You see, I got hacked, and it was a lot of a long time ago. A long time ago. I think it was in 1991 that I first my company got a worm. I was trying to build my company. We were building websites were hosting email for people, and it was terrible. We got the Morris worm. If you've been on my one of my webinars, you know a little bit about what happened. I don't want that to happen to you, right. Text me or email me at Craig Peterson the meantime.

A couple more articles real quick, and you'll find those in your newsletter this week. Hong Kong protests here are showing us the dangers of this cashless society and showing us that, frankly, a cashless society is a surveillance society. In Hong Kong, they have something called an octopus card, and they use it to pay for everything from the subways transit to retail parking purchases. In China, they have something very similar. It's part of a social media and messaging service called WeChat. It allows for payments. It is easy and effective. In China, you have to use it. In Hong Kong, you don't, but the transactions linked to your identity. Communist Party officials, here known as the international socialists, are using it to track people and zealots. That way they can tell you were in the area of a demonstration when it occurred, and you get tagged. Remember, in China when that happens, you are not allowed onto public transportation, you get barred from using it. Let's keep cash going. Pay with paper money when you can. I think that's important. We don't want to switch to a cashless society. There was a great study out of Montreal, about teams and social media. Again, you'll see links to these in your newsletter. Craig Peterson dot com slash subscribe because we do not have time to go through all of these but a big surprise, at least to me, in this study that I think you want to hear. I love this quote too from one of the researchers talking about depression with these teenagers social media, and a big surprise about video games. I would almost compare it to smoking in the 1970s where the very adverse effects are still relatively unknown. But they did draw some interesting conclusions.

There is a bill in Congress right now. Great article from Reuters that I posted about big tech companies from offering financial services. It's called the Keep Big Tech out of Finance Act. President Trump commented on it. He's demanding that companies that want to get into this cyber currency business, seek a banking charter, and I agree with him on this one. But this whole Facebook thing that's going to be coming out here probably next year is called the Libra. It's a little scary if you ask me.

A Florida DMV is selling driver's license information, your personal information to bill collectors and data brokers in Florida. They have made more than $77 million on selling your personal information if you can believe that. That's what I don't like about this whole REAL ID thing is that the State is now required by federal under federal law to comply with Real ID. Thank you, Democrats (tongue firmly planted in cheek) who voted for it in here the State when they took over New Hampshire. I don't want the government having that information because I don't want them to resell it.

I'm going to do a special master class around this article from Fast Company. It is about how the hackers are using social media to break into your company and how they're doing it step by step. Keep an eye out for this as well.

Take care, everybody. We will be back on Monday. I'm on with Jack Heath during drive time. Check it all out at Craig Peterson dot com. Have a great weekend, everybody. Bye-bye. Oh, and keep cool, if you can.

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Related articles:

The Fertile Garden of Social Media is ripe for attracting Cybercriminals to your Business

How DMVs Make Millions – Selling Your License Information

Big Tech Banks, U.S. says Not So Fast

When Governments Demonetize by Force

How Cold? Researchers Predict Large Decrease in Sunspot Activity

Increases in Teen Depression — Check their Social Media

 

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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

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Jul 19, 2019

Craig was on with Jim Polito. We talked in some detail about some of the 50 years that have passed since we landed on the moon and the massive changes we have seen in technology. Why Google and Facebook and the whole social media thing are a direct threat to our democracy. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

Apple has a problem with Zoom and so should you 

New MacBooks Coming

Did You Turn of Tracking? Guess What?  Apps are Still Tracking You.

Chinese Ministry of State Security Attacks Major Companies Internal Networks

Hollywood on the Skids with Virtual Stars

Worried About Privacy? Steve Wozniak says Delete Facebook

Got Chinese Security Cameras? Just Try to Remove them.

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/16/2019

50 years since we landed on the moon. Changes we have seen in technology. Google and Facebook and the whole social media thing and the direct threat to our democracy.

--- 

Craig Peterson
Hey good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson, here. We are in for a hot pot time here northern New England is supposed to get up to 99 degrees this weekend. It's going to be hot. I heard this morning down in Phoenix it's going to be 115, but you know Phoenix it's it is a dry heat. I've got to admit that it's just not as bad. I've been to Phoenix quite a few times, and I think it's not bad at all. Up here, man that humidity supposed to be high. It's going to be uncomfortable. You know, I don't know how to live in Florida or not. Where do you retire? Anyhow, I was on with Mr. Jim Polito. And we spent a little bit of time talking about the moon shot and some of the technology out there. But we delved into some reasons that I bet you may not have heard before, maybe you thought about I don't know you guys are pretty smart about why you might want to read move your Facebook, login, get rid of that account, but Google and everything. This whole social media thing and what's been happening online is a direct threat to our democracy. So here we go with Mr. Jim Polito

Jim Polito
On this anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11 to the moon. First man on the moon. I'm sure if he were working, then he would have been right there at the forefront. Joining us now. Our Tech Talk guru and good friend Craig Peterson. Good morning,

Craig Peterson
Sir. Hey, good morning. Oh, that I could have been like goodness, I remember it. So well. Sitting there, watching TV. Oh, man, I was working in my uncle's store selling penny candy. Yeah, for those who aren't aware, candy used to be a penny.

Jim Polito
I remember, we shut the store. Yeah, the whole thing. Wow, son of a gun. I still remember it as a little kid, little boy, and wanting to be an astronaut. Remember, with my brothers and my parents watching it on a black and white TV. And then Teddy Kennedy crashed his car off a bridge and Chappaquiddick. And, you know, he was lucky that they were going to the moon because everybody was paying attention to that instead of him. I remember the day after it was the first time I had ever seen color in the newspaper on the front page

Craig Peterson
Yeah, was a color picture of the moon shot of the moon landing. It was such a time in America. And at the time, I was living the great white North thing. Yeah. And even up there. It was, it was the thing of things. It was just the most incredible thing ever. I don't know that we'll ever have it. If not, then I don't think a Mars landing would have anywhere near the No, no.

Jim Polito
Yeah, no. It was different back then. I mean, technology was reasonable compared to now. And what people expect? No, it would not be as big of a deal. The entire world would never be transfixed as we were then. No, not like we were back then. But back then, you know, guys like Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs. They were, you know, they had some ideas, and they were smart guys like you. And Steve Wozniak was one of the CO creators of apple. But now he is saying, delete your Facebook account. If you want any online privacy, what's this all about, Craig?

Craig Peterson
Well, this is huge. And I think most people know a little bit about the online privacy for were you mentioned to a friend on Facebook or one of their different platforms, remember, they own that, you know, they have their messenger platform and Oculus, they've got a whole bunch of different platforms. Now, if you mentioned something else, platforms, most people are aware, all of a sudden you start seeing ads for it. And you know, what, what are they trying to do? We've known forever, that Facebook isn't the product. We are the product. They're trying to sell advertising to various vendors out there. I don't think that comes as a surprise to anybody. I think Steve Wozniak had a point about this, too, when you read this particular article from the Daily Mail, remember, this is out of the UK, we don't see this kind of coverage much here in the States. But he says, you know, he's worried about everything. So let's have a look at what's happening. Next year, we've got got a big election coming up. And we've got people who are on the line who are going around, right, talking about the election. But before we get into that, I want to get into one more point about this. How does Facebook make money? The bottom line is they make money, by selling your information to advertisers, so that they can place an ad in front of you. Now, personally, I would prefer to get an advertisement for cars when I'm thinking about buying a car, right? I'm not interested in enlargement or other types of products. Yeah, that you used to see online all of the time. I'm just not interested in those. However, what they're doing now is they're trying to manipulate your decisions. Now. Okay, that makes sense. Should I buy shreddies or something like corn flakes? If shreddies is advertising? Well, that's a Canadian cereal.

Jim Polito
Shreddies, one sec, advert ties with Facebook, they're going to pull up an ad, that's a breakfast cereal, they're going to pay for it.

Craig Peterson
So now Facebook's job is to manipulate you in potentially subtle ways to buy the product of that advertiser. Now, how did they do that? You know, back in the day, if you follow somebody on Facebook, you would see everything that person said. Now what Facebook does is it manipulates what it's showing you. And it's shaping the results "for your benefit." Air quotes around that. In case you're wondering, yeah, and the idea of for your benefit is right, they don't want to waste your time. So they're only going to show you the postings that contain words like Happy birthday, or Congratulations, or little posts that are popular amongst your friends. But they can use psychology, and they do use psychological tricks here to manipulate you into thinking, wow, maybe I should eat some breakfast cereal this morning. And they'll do that by showing you articles, postings and things that are related to products that they're promoting. So they're trying to manipulate your decisions to get you to buy more things to get you to buy things that maybe you wouldn't have bought before. Okay, so that's a fascinating point. So let's move on to Project Veritas. Now, Project Veritas, if you're not familiar with it, this is this guy that runs around, for those that aren't sure what's going on here, and he does undercover reporting. He's the guy that found all kinds of stuff out about Planned Parenthood and selling baby parts. I think everyone's heard that on the news, right? So he had an article that came out that and he brought it up online courses of videos on YouTube, and YouTube almost immediately shut it down. Right. And there's a very intriguing story on the new site called Spinquark (https://www.spinquark.com/) S-P-I-N-Q-U-A-R-K that you might want to check out. And it's looking on LinkedIn. And it has pictures of the pages there on LinkedIn. So if you go to spin, Clark, you'll see it's like the first link on the page. But they went to LinkedIn. And they found who is working for Facebook, who is working for Google, who are the top people in these different companies, and they put up snapshots of the Facebook pages with their names blurred out 31 of these senior people are people who came straight from the Obama campaign. Twenty-five of them from the Clinton campaign. Fifteen of them are former from the DNC. Five of them are directly from Pelosi's office. So we were talking about manipulation, the distillation of results. According to the Los Angeles Times, this just came out last week, and they're talking about a study by a professor in California, who was looking at the search engine manipulation effect. And the ones that he looked at the people he looked at, he had 47,000 searches by dozens of undecided voters in the districts of newly elected democrat reps and Porter router and Levin. And what he found was that there are an estimated 35,500 people's votes. These are voters who are on the fence. They were persuaded to vote for democrats entirely because of the sources that Google sent to them.

Jim Polito
Wow.

Craig Peterson
Now, same things happening with Facebook, you have this many people just very high super high percentage of people working for Facebook working for Google, who came straight from the left-wing politicians who are known to be manipulating search results to favor them who have come out. And some of these people have publicly said that the Trump election was an absolute travesty, and they're going to do everything they can to make sure it doesn't happen again.

Jim Polito
Did the Project Veritas uncover that Yes, precisely?

Craig Peterson
Now you have an understanding of why someone like Steve Wozniak line like people like me are saying this is and the Los Angeles Times although you know, they've been taking potshots at this, this study. But even the LA Times is saying, hey, people, not only can you be tracked online, they are tracking you online. You are their product, but they are manipulating you. Wow, in every way they possibly can. Okay, so this is a much bigger story than I think most people we're aware of, Jim.

Jim Polito
Look, this story. Other important stories. Did you hear that folks, you can get them from my friend Craig Peterson, even when he's not here? And all you have to do is text My name to this number

Craig Peterson
855-385-5553. That's texting Jim, to 855-385-5553.


Jim Polito
Standard data and text rates apply. But that's it. He won't try to sell you anything you. He won't annoy you. And he will provide you with this kind of information. There are so many things that Craig and I could talk about every week, so much information he gives to me. We don't have the time to do it all. But you can get it all from him. Craig, Thank you. That was fascinating. I appreciate the time, and we'll talk to you next week.

Craig Peterson
Hey, take care, Jim. Thanks. Bye, bye.

Craig Peterson
Hey, I reached out to a few of you guys who are on my email list to see if there's something I can help you with help your business with more particularly when it comes to security. So if you haven't responded to that email, please do let me know. Also, don't forget, we've got our security summer coming up here in just a couple of weeks. I'm going to make that happen. Keep an eye out on your email for that as well. We're going to go through 24 brass tacks, back to basics getting your business up to a mainstream security standard is what we're starting to call this thing. We might have something there. It covers the things you need to be doing you should be doing, whether you are a CEO, we're going to help you with governance, if you are a home user, what you should be doing in the home. And then also if you're the designated IT person for your business, what you should be doing for the company as well. So we have three different tracks. Keep an eye out. We are working hard on this. All right. Have a great day. We'll be back tomorrow with the WGAN and the interviews happening there. Bye-bye.

---

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Jul 19, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. This morning we talked about Deep fakes and the future for actors, Why you might want to delete Facebook. and About the new Apple MacBooks.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

 

Apple has a problem with Zoom and so should you 

New MacBooks Coming

Did You Turn of Tracking? Guess What?  Apps are Still Tracking You.

Chinese Ministry of State Security Attacks Major Companies Internal Networks

Hollywood on the Skids with Virtual Stars

Worried About Privacy? Steve Wozniak says Delete Facebook

Got Chinese Security Cameras? Just Try to Remove them.

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/17/2019

Deep fakes and the future for actors, Why you might want to delete Facebook. and About the new Apple MacBooks.

---

Craig
Hello again, everybody. Craig Peterson here. I've been thinking about maybe trying to send out a little survey. I don't know, would you guys respond to it? About what content you really would like to see in my security summer? I may end up doing that. Let me know if you think that'd be a good idea because I'm, I'm looking at what we put together, and it's six weeks, five episodes per week. And should we do that I'm looking out my window here. And there's a deer right outside my window eating the grass in the backyard. They've been eating our flowers, and they got into our tomato plants and ate them all. Right now she's just sitting there eating wagging her tail. The chickens are staring at her. Watching her out there. That is so cool. Anyhow, what topics do you want me to cover in this free security summer summit stuff? Please let me know, and I'll be glad to, to bring you up to date on that. Anyhow, this morning, I was on with our friends Ken and Matt. And we got into a couple more things here more about deep fakes. And what is going on? What's the future for actors? And are they going to put these deep fakes humans right out of business? And we talked a little bit more to about deleting Facebook, and I even came up with a couple more reasons to get rid of some of these things and stop using Google and stuff. I don't know. I don't think I'll ever completely stop. But anyway, here we go.

Matt Gagnon
It's that time yet again, ladies and gentlemen, Wednesday at 738 means it is time for a technology update from Craig Peterson tech guru extraordinaire, a friend of the show, and he joins us now Craig, how are you?

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning doing well but I am not looking forward to these high temperatures

Ken Altshuler
From Oklahoma. That's the difference between you and me, Craig?

Ken Altshuler
Yeah. I was going to ask you about the MacBook Pros. Once again, I have to bring my computer into Apple to fix the T key that fell off. But rather than that, I want to talk about Steve Wozniak first, who, of course, one of the Apple founders, who is saying, and I'm shocked by this, he says, You should delete Facebook. I can't believe he suggests that.

Craig Peterson
Exactly. Well, you know, we've heard so many reasons to remove Facebook right to delete your account to destroy all of that information. And most of them have to do with privacy. And you know, it's a legitimate argument. But it also sucks.

Matt Gagnon
FaceTime, or what is it that you call my face? Face my face by my face? Yeah, my face,

Ken Altshuler
Face, my face, face,

Craig Peterson
Face to face. There you go, My space. One of the big reasons for this something that I'm sure Matt knows about it. We've had some fascinating revelations that came from Project Veritas. These are guys going to go and do these interviews with people and they tape them without anybody's knowledge, and then they report on it. Well, there is a huge deal going on right now when you are talking about Facebook and Google. And remember, Facebook isn't just Facebook anymore. Now they've got a bunch of different platforms that people are using to communicate. But the real big deal has to do with the manipulation that's going on. There's a new site up right now called Spinquark (https://news.spinquark.com/), you might want to check it out. And the first link there on their homepage takes you to a fascinating article. And what these guys did is they went online to LinkedIn. And they searched around LinkedIn for the senior people on YouTube, Twitter, and Facebook. Were talking about the upper-level managers, directors, etc. And what they found was in all of these companies, of the predominance of them were left-wing, I mean, really left-wing. They found 31 people who were senior people in the Obama campaign and administration, who were all senior managers of these social media companies. 25, associated directly with the Clinton administration, and the Clinton Foundation. 16, who came straight out of the DNC, the Democratic National Committee, and five who worked directly for Speaker Pelosi. When you're talking about people like this, who are involved in very high levels on everything from who should be censored, what should be censored, and what can be said. Then have some of these people coming out directly saying that we cannot allow a mistake like President Trump to occur again. We must do everything we can to stop it from happening again. The Los Angeles Times is even reporting on this right now. Although it came out a few months ago. There was a psychiatrist out there in San Diego, who had done a bunch of research, he looked at several people 47,000 searches that were done by undecided voters. And he looked at three specific newly elected democrat reps from 2018, Porter, Rouda and Levin. He looked at the searches that were done in their districts to try and figure out is there a tie? And if these conservative people had a point. His research found that based on their searches about 35,500 undecided voters or who were on the fence could be persuaded to vote for democrats. How? Entirely due to the "news" that they saw on their feeds from these social media and news sites. We've got to think when we're thinking about a Facebook account, or even at Google, where we're doing searches about things from poisonings search results, which can be kind of fun sometimes to do. So what will happen is someone's searching for something, then you can manipulate the search engine to give them a different result. And maybe it should carry through a Facebook. So for instance, when you first got your Facebook account, and you followed someone, you imitate the celebrity, you would get all of their posts and your feed. And then what Facebook did is they said, Hey, listen, you know this is a little much, we should probably give them information we think they might interest them. If someone mentions a birthday or Congratulations, those are more likely to show up in your Facebook feed, then anything else, frankly. If they are friends of yours and are sharing something more likely to show up in your feed. But now it's come out just this past week, that, in fact, for part of what they're doing is they are purposely manipulating your feed to sway you. Now, when we're talking about influencing you to remember how these guys make money, they make money through advertising, they make money by selling things. So if they have an advertiser that's selling something that you might not otherwise be interested in, show you that end. But it turns out that there may be a lot more manipulation going on, then we thought, and they might even be trying to get you to do into a whole new category of products. Or in this case, also the Los Angeles Times reported. And this is professor, author of algorithms of oppression, how search engines reinforce racism, how they are using their power, by being such big powerhouses in the social media search spaces, to manipulate undecided people. That's what this particular study was about, into voting for the Democrats. So fascinating stuff, you know, because you, you get information from every direction. And nowadays where we've got these photorealistic videos, where they're pasting people's faces, other people's faces on to other people's bodies, etc. And it's hard to tell, how can you know what's right or wrong? You have to listen to Ken, Matt, and Craig. Mm-hmm.

Ken Altshuler
All right, we're on with Craig Peterson the tech guru joins us periodically. Now let's talk about MacBook Pro. Shall we buy new ones or are they're not changing. The keys now are that you just you're never going to give up the key thing? I'm not, and it is unbelievably irritating to me. Yes.

Craig Peterson
They are. The latest rumors are they're going to whole new design. They're getting rid of the butterfly design entirely. After three iterations, I think it has been event butterfly keyboard design, that has been a disaster, they are going to be switching. And what it does mean is a slightly thicker computer. I think it's like a few millimeters thicker. Like who cares, right, two or three millimeters, it's going to be slightly thicker. To use different technology, they're not going to go back to the old Chiclets designs, which I kind of like, but they are going to change it. So can you can about time rest easy. Yeah, this is a rumor. You don't know this, the Chinese manufacturers that all of a sudden cancel. So other keyboard orders because they got a large order from some Unknown, Unknown manufacturer. It's all tied back to Apple. But they did do a couple of significant changes here recently in the Mac Book line just within the last two weeks. And those do not have these significant changes yet, so we should be seeing them come this fall.

Matt Gagnon
We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us at this time every Wednesday to go over the world of technology. Craig, I have to ask you about one of the more interesting stories here in your rundown about the future of acting because you see increasingly in a lot of movies. Actors do age to look sort of kind of like they used to 20 years ago you're seeing dead people come back into movies. Well, exactly. I mean, you got the new Star Wars movie coming out later this year the test her, and she's dead. And you had the guy from the very first Star Wars movie, who was put into the last the Rogue One Star Wars movie there. There are holograms of dead people like singing with people in Vegas. You know, there's just crazy stuff happening. I guess the question comes down to this. Will we even need actors anymore in the future or work everywhere? Can we can we can produce? It is, you know, fake or digitally created person to act for us and the future?

Craig Peterson
Do you remember the movie, Simone? Did you see that with Al Pacino?

Matt Gagnon
I did see that movie, believe it or not?

Craig Peterson
Yeah, it's spelled S-I-M-O-N-E. Exciting movie because it's taking this on head-on. And what happens in this movie, it just the basic I'm not going to give it away here even right on what writers in this movie. But it's an artificially created actress. And you have someone who is still voicing that who's always talking who's again doing the acting. That's our next step. You even will have an actor like the terrible job they did with Carrie Fisher phase in Rogue One was awful.

Matt Gagnon
Targeting grandma off-target was not that great either. That way. There's that uncanny valley thing where it's like, and you could tell Something's Weird About It. You know, even though it sort of looks real. It looks a little rubbery or something. Something's messed up with it. Like they're not quite there yet. They're closed, but they're not

Ken Altshuler
All the way scar.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, it'll be about five to 10 years. And here's why it's going to take a little while. Our brains are excellent at being able to tell the difference between phasers, and you know, you think about it, and how can we tell you two apart? You guys look identical? No, we do.

Ken Altshuler
We like twins.

Craig Peterson
It's like twins, and it's like five years different. You know, you could argue it. So how can we tell people apart? Well, because our brains have become very, very good at recognizing faces and, and flaws. So anything that shows even a little wrong, you look at like if you look at somebody get plastic surgery, most of the time, you can say oh my god, they need to see a new person plastic surgeon is you can tell. So it's going to be a while yet before we get to this. We've got the further live interaction with Dumbo. And with the Lion King, that's coming out with some animation. CGI, this computer-generated stuff is excellent. When there's not a human face a real human face involved. Stylized, it's very acceptable. For instance, a leader I don't know if you saw that latest movie, where again, it's computer-generated, but it looks computer-generated. Yeah, they made the eyes big and stuff to say, yeah, yeah. So that you don't catch it. How long man, it's not going to be very long, frankly, we're going to be able to with within five years, we'll see this being relatively commonplace. And within ten years, only the best the biggest blockbusters are going to have real people, you know, in every role in there. Because there are some things that humans can't do, even if they have a stunt double. And you will be able to do with science fiction and stuff with some of these fake actors here. Frankly, I think it's kind of cool. I think it's kind of scary. You know, I think we've talked before a little bit about the risks to our security. When it comes to this. We've already got new emails coming in telling the CFO to send money to some vendor that isn't a real vendor, and they're trying to scam us right with phishing attacks. Artificial Intelligence is going to get more involved with this. That's going to improve it dramatically. That's why I say in five to 10 years. I think most actors and actresses are not going to be able to have a job doing that anymore. Voice actors probably sell for a while, but even that's going to go away.

Matt Gagnon
Well, considering the Emmy nominations and probably wouldn't be any significant loss anyway. Craig Peterson Tech guru joins us every Wednesday. 738. Thank you, Craig. We'll talk to you next week.

Craig Peterson
Hey, gentlemen, take care. Bye-bye.

Ken Altshuler
Alright, so we're going to go to a quick break here. When we come back.

Craig Peterson
If you do have suggestions on topics you want me to cover in this security summer, email me at Craig Peterson dot com. That's me at Craig Peterson dot com. All right, everybody. Take care.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Jul 19, 2019

There was massive, colossal third party hack this week.

Zoom and a considerable security problem tied into a problem they're having in France right now. If you use Zoom on a Mac, listen up.

Congress that requires the federal government to remove some of these security cameras. I will tell you why it's almost impossible to remove these things.

Apple this week made some changes to the Mac books. They discontinued the MacBook itself.

I am planning a Security Summer for my listeners.  I will have some free courses.  I will also introduce you to some of the software that I use for my clients and how you can use it too.  Also, I have some limited opportunities for businesses who have had enough with their security issues to work with me and my team and put their security problems to rest once and for all.   So watch out for announcements on those.

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript: 

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/13/2019

A massive, colossal third party hack this week. Zoom security problem. Congress that requires removal of Chinese made security cameras. Apple changes their Mac books.   

----

Hey, everybody, welcome. Craig Peterson here, hope you're having a great day. There is a ton to cover today. I'm going to kind of talk a fair amount about something I think is essential. Everybody we've got had a massive, colossal hack this week. But you weren't hacked. But your business wasn't hacked. But there was a third party breach. And this is going to affect many companies in a significant way. So we're going to tell you how to avoid having that happen to you in the future. Exactly what's going on there. Today, we also going to talk about Zoom and a considerable security problem tied into a problem they're having in France right now. If you use Zoom on a Mac, listen up. There is a huge battle going on right now behind the scenes. That's what happened in France to not zoom, but they did the Bank of China. Man, we talked about them before. There was a bill passed in Congress that requires the federal government to remove some of these security cameras. I will tell you why it's almost impossible to remove these things. If you have security cameras, man, oh, man, we have seen those be a huge problem. It's called a launch point for attacks. It's just crazy. So we'll talk a little bit about that. Apple this week made some changes to the Mac books. They discontinued the MacBook itself. So they now have some very cool MacBook Air models and some MacBook Pro models. A lot of people ask me, and this is probably the biggest question I get from people when it's talking about Apple. Especially for those who have not used this platform before. Is it worth it? Well, I think it is, is frankly, they cost a little bit more, upfront. But when you add up the prices, the cost, they're cheaper, they're a lot cheaper, I typically expect a MacBook Pro to last me eight years, maybe 10 we've had in the last 10 or 11 years before, but an eight-year life versus your average laptop, which is two or three years over on the windows side. So I do think it's worth it. Plus, the machines tend to work a lot better, they're smoother, they are less likely to be attacked, and they have a more secure operating system. Although I have to hand it to Microsoft's new CEO, he is pulling up the socks over there, Microsoft on many, many fronts. While I am not an investor, I can say it's finally a company I would consider investing in as they've done some fantastic things.

Apple has made some changes with these Macbooks that they announced this week. And that's an excellent thing. But the 12 inch MacBook is gone. Now. Remember, when they introduced the MacBook years ago, those little plastic ones, which I liked, I had one used one that was quite cute. I think you might like them. There has been a lot in the news over the last few weeks about Amazon listening in. And obviously, you don't want anybody listening to conversations. And you probably already know my opinion on this. But here's the bottom line for those that haven't heard it before. Yes, the Amazon devices, the Google devices, etc. Yes, they can listen, and they have to. But I know with Amazon with their echoes, they've got the hardware setup in such a way that if they're turning on the microphone to send data to record, that little light bar has to come on, they haven't checked it lately, I probably should. But the hardware was designed so that if it's captured audio that light bars on so other than listening for its name, you know, the wakeup word that you would use, it's not capturing anything, it's not sending it up to the cloud. And we've seen court cases a murder cases where they subpoenaed the records, and they wanted to listen in on the conversation that happened just before the murder. And of course, it was not recording it. So there was no conversation that they could playback. And there's nothing they could use in the court case. Now, if you're very, very paranoid, and I know a lot of people that are, and I am on the Paranoid side by myself, you probably don't want to have one of these things. Now I do have them because I want to understand how it works. I found them to be convenient. I use it, frankly, kind of sparingly. But that's what's happening with the Amazon Echo devices, these personal assistants. Now, Google has hit the news just this week, revealing that Google was sharing recordings of people's commands with third parties. Now, in this case, the third parties were developers, software developers, and frankly, you've got to expect them to have access to your, you know, recordings, right? You hopefully aren't thinking that if you ask Alexa or Amazon, Google Home, whatever it is, if you ask them a question, hopefully, you do not think that it's never recorded and never kept because they are. And Amazon keeps the recordings of your voice forever. And unless you go in and manually delete them, and there's some you can't delete, etc. So don't ask stupid questions that you might regret later on. So Google's getting the heat now because some of these Google Home device recordings ended up in the hands of third-party contractors subcontractors to Google now is that much different than having them in the hands of Google employees? Hard to say, I guess you could certainly argue that, once it's out of Google's hands, they don't have access to or control over the data. And because of that, a could be a bad thing, right. And I get that I do get that because hopefully, Google has perfect security. And for everything we've seen, they probably do have some excellent security. But who knows about the subcontractors. Now, that's the bottom line there. So it was disclosed that I think it was like 1000 or so I'm sure the numbers will change over time. But some of these recordings are in the hands of contractors. And so I think the media is frankly, blowing it up here. I'm not going to blow this one up. Because, again, I think if you're asking the electronic assistant to do something for you, you do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy. You know, there's some expectation of privacy. But how often are these devices hacked and everything right? It's just, and it's a constant thing. So you know, don't expect your data to be kept safe. Next up, we talked about deep fakes before. And I saw this, and I was so disappointed. Did you see Star Wars Rogue One, this isn't 2016 Rogue One, A Star Wars story, I thought the story was rather good. It didn't have a whole ton of tie ins. You know, there's like, there's not a fork that I can see that they're planning on running with off of Rogue One. Maybe they are, frankly, you know, early rebellion type things. But in that movie, there was a terrible version of a young Carrie Fisher, Princess Leia. And that actress, there was an actress obviously, that they used her face. And they tried to make it look like Carrie Fisher, and they did a terrible job. But Today, even this was back in 2016. Today, you can do a better job than they the Lucas Films did. Right now with your reasonably high-end home computer. And the question again has come up in this age where we have deep fakes, where we've got Mark Zuckerberg faked online, we've got porn, which they have faked where they're putting some famous actresses face on someone else's body in a porn shoot. How can you tell what's real? And I have talked before about how this could be a huge problem. When it comes to politics. Think about the things that you could have a politician say because it's not the politician that saying that you look at some of the things President Trump says and you kind of roll your eyes. Why would you even say something like that? Right? And you know, this is separate from his policies. But if you have a deep thing that comes out that looks like the person that sounds like something they might say, how can you tell if it's real? And then let's move on to the next step. Remember, Ronald Reagan with the open mic, a lot different than President Obama's open mic where he said, you know, tell Vlad, I'll have more flexibility after the election, right, when he was cooperating with the Russians, and they were colluding together. So, you know, not the President Obama thing, but the open mic with President Reagan, where he was saying, Hey, listen, the bottom line, well, I'm trying to remember the exact quote, but the missiles on Moscow will start falling in five minutes or something like that, I can't remember what it was. And it freaked out the Russians. And some people attribute that to kind of the death nail for the great Soviet Empire. Big all of a sudden now, you know, they couldn't feed their people, they didn't have items on the shelves, it was a socialist system. And as usual, it was failing. And they now figured they had to escalate the arms race and do so much more, because of what President Reagan said. So now fast forward to now, maybe next year and election year, what will happen if they deep fake President Trump saying something that is going to get Iran all up in arms, right, as though there's not enough tension already? Or maybe Russia or China or you name it? How about just one of our good trading partners, Great Britain, or Canada or Mexico? What's going to happen, then? There's, I think, the biggest potential problem with deep fakes because what that means is we are potentially going to see wars started, maybe not between the US and other countries, but maybe between smaller countries, maybe between politicians, right? We already know politicians are out there saying things that are just outrages, taking stuff completely out of context. And even worse, fabricating stuff. So what happens when they can do this and make it look like their opponent set it? Huge, right, huge deal? Well, now the Actors Guild and the actors are starting to get a little bit concerned, because of the potential of these virtual acting stars. Look at what Disney has done lately with Dumbo and the Lion King, where they're pulling the real world in with CGI along with animation. And so much of it is just so seamless. It's amazing. Not that you can't tell that Dumbo isn't a real elephant. Or some of these other characters are actors aren't real, but that's going to change, and that's going to change very, very quickly. So it's going to get to the point where they could hire an actor or actress to act in something. And it's just an, a, b, or c actor. It could be almost anybody off of the street. Now they have to be able to do a little bit of acting; obviously, their facial expressions have to be good, and they have to match. But let's look at the voiceover industry that used to be in cartoons. We had Mel Blanc who was doing all of those things for Warner Brothers, but in cartoons and voiceovers for commercials. You had professional voiceover actors who did a great job. And then it changed a little bit, and Robin Williams was upset because one of the things he did not want to happen has happened he did the voice of the genie in a Latin your remember that I'm sure he did a great job. He improvised the line. Robin Williams had expressed at the time that he did not want the whole voiceover community to be hurt by this he didn't want it to switch to having brand name actors doing voiceovers, you know, doing the comedy sketches basically in the middle of movies. And of course, that's what ended up happening. That the community now has moved from just a straight-up professional voice actor to now, we have regular actors doing commercials and voiceovers, etc. Some of you know it's one thing if they're they're the face of a brand it's another if it's just a straight-up voiceover. So what's going to happen here with the next step, the next evolution in this which will be having voiceover type talent, having an instant? Is it going to be the reverse right? Instead of paying an actress like Carrie Fisher who's passed now button, you know A, B or an A actor to do a scene, they can now come up with a new creative face.

That is just the most beautiful face ever most handsome face has the exact attributes they want. Maybe it's the evilness looking face, and, and create that character that they can use throughout a series like Avengers. Look at we've lost Tony Stark now, in from the Avengers series. And according to what I've been reading, they lost the actor. There are two or three actors that are gone now. Because they wanted too much money to do new movies. And I get it from the actor's standpoint. And you know, you don't want to be typecast, etc. You help build that brand. But when the brand is 100% copyrightable, where they created the face, they created the voice with the work of, let's say, a voice actor or someone else. And they now absolutely own it, then what's going to happen? Very interesting. I think that if you're a waitress, I mean, an actress in Los Angeles, in Hollywood, you might want to think twice about this. Now, we see right now a resurgence of need for actors, actresses, because we have everybody producing content, which is, by the way, going to drive up the cost, you thought streaming was going to save you money over the cable TV, not so much. Because what's going to happen here shortly is as CBS, NBC, and Netflix and Hulu, and Disney and even Comcast compete for the eyeballs, they're going to be creating more content. And that means they're going to be raising their prices. So instead of just subscribing to maybe Netflix and Hulu. Now you're going to have Netflix, Hulu, HBO, NBC CBS, ABC, Fox and each one of those is going to be 10 or 20 bucks a month. So the costs are going to go way, way up. So that's the next evolution in that. But ultimately, within ten years, this technology is going to be cheap. And I don't think we're going to need the actors anywhere near what we need Today. The salaries that they are demanding 10's of millions of dollars to do one movie and these days are going to end. You might even remember, Industrial Light and Magic ILM, and they came out of nowhere from the Star Wars universe. And now they're in every major motion picture. You're going to get studios, like an ILM, that develop a character with a backstory and stuff. The primary thing is a character with some flaws one we can love, one that we like listen to and watch. There will be a voice and video, you know, an entire visual presentation and the whole world will change. It's going to change in a big way. Okay, so next up of with let's get into the big news of this week. You're listening, of course to Craig Peterson, make sure you get the weekly updates I had I just got in a shout out again to Sue hopefully you're listening. Today I met with Sue this week, she had sent in a request we did a cyber health assessment, and we're doing some more stuff for her now. We're doing a deeper dive, and we found some stuff that is not only questionable but negative. So shout out to her. We also had a comment this week. And I want to thank James for this one. And this is where he said hey, thanks, Craig. If I hadn't been on your email list, I would not have known about this vulnerability, and he patched it because, of course, I gave instructions on it. So if you want to know more if you want to make sure that you can get the right patches at the right time make sure you visit my website Craig Peterson calm and are right there on the top of I think pretty much every page now. You are going to find a sign up to sign up for my email list. I believe me I don't scam you spam you anything else. Not like one of these marketers is sending you two pieces of email a day. I keep it minimal, absolutely minimal. So Craig Peterson calm. Okay, next up. So this last week, it came out that there was a breach of a US-based cloud solution provider. Now here's how this affects you and your business. This company, called PCM, is generating 2.2 billion dollars in revenue. They've got more than 2000 customers; each of them is a business. It is an article from Security Affairs. The sources say PCs discovered the intrusion in mid-May 2019. Those sources say the attacker stole administrative can credentials that PCM uses to manage client accounts within Office 365 a cloud-based filed an email sharing service run by Microsoft now that came originally from Krebs. Krebs on security is a great site, by-the-way, you should check it out. Krebs is speculating that the intruders could be the same that hack the Indian IT outsourcing giant Wipro this year. It is fascinating because again, this is further proof that outsourcing your IT outsourcing your cloud management does not make you safe. Very, very big deal. Now, I have to tie something else into this because I think that these two may be related. Microsoft Corp. Now, of course, this is the company that makes office 365. We use Office 365 for a lot of our clients. It depends on their size and specific requirements, and we also host email servers for some of our clients. We use Office 365, before other of our clients, and Microsoft themselves even says, Hey, listen, we're not guaranteeing you any security, we're not guaranteeing you any good filtering for your emails, we're not guaranteeing that your data will be safe if you put it on the Microsoft Cloud. We're not even guaranteeing that your data will be there next week. Because we don't back it up for you, you have to do all of this. So most businesses that I've talked to aren't aware of any of these things. There are huge deficiencies in the O365. But what's Microsoft going to do? Well, especially at the price points they sell it for, they there isn't a margin in it for them. To fix this, Microsoft uses companies like mine and many other companies, not like mine, to resell their office 365. And what Microsoft's thinking was or is, is that we have Mainstream, we have Craig company, authorized to sell, install, help their clients use Office 365 features, right, and so now people using Microsoft Teams, and they're using the Microsoft email and outlook and they've got word and you know, whole office suite and everything. And it's a wonderful thing. But I am as the provider, and I am now the master administrator for my clients. And as a Master administrator, I can create new users for them, and I can take them off, I can add specific licenses. If someone wants to use this particular Microsoft product, but other people don't need it. And they pay by the month and based on what the usages. I can reset the passwords, and I can check the security logs, right? I can do all of this stuff is basically a super administrator for their service, then this is great for Microsoft because now that if someone calls them up and tries to scam them saying, Yeah, I'm on the CEO of IBM, and I want access to my account, I lost my password, reset it for me What? Okay, what do you change it to, right? So someone calling Microsoft, it's going to be hard to validate who they are. But somebody's calling Mainstream. I know who the customers are, right? My people know, we know their voices because we were a small company. We're a family company, yet we have other people that are members of my family. But we're a small company that cares about and works with the clients. So a client calls me and says, Hi, I'm president of x, y, z Corp. We know if they are not right, we know what they do. Typically, we're not going to give away figures out their store to someone that is faking it. So from Microsoft standpoint, it's great because they don't get those calls, they don't have the liability that goes along with it that we have, which is why we provide a million dollars worth of insurance underwritten by Lloyds of London, I think that's an important thing for security for businesses. So if they do get hacked, or something happens, you know, there is coverage, and then we also have that kind of coverage. But anyhow, Microsoft doesn't want all that liability, and they would need a million-dollar, they probably need 100 million dollars. they probably self insure they have plenty of cash. It is a fascinating business model.

Now, a lot of people out there a lot of businesses who were brake fixed shops have said oh, well, you know, we can make more money, recurring monthly revenue or a monthly recurring revenue by selling office 365. Because we'll earn $5 a month, per account, you know, five bucks a month. Are you kidding me? That's, it's hardly worth billing for $5 a month if you're a small company. The collections of follow up, you have to make a phone call because I didn't pay it. But you have the check processing fee from your bank all of this stuff. How's it? How's it worth it? It's not. So what you have to do is you have to bundle it as a service offering so they can call if they have problems and we take care of things. But these other companies, unlike Mainstream, who are out there not I'm not saying every company like this. But these different companies, what do they know about security? What do they know about the in-depth stuff? Right? I've been doing it now I hate to admit this, but for 45 years? Me personally, okay, then when you add in all of the time from all the people working with me, and we're well past the century mark. So there's a huge difference. But how do you know? So a lot of people, we just lost a client. Because of this, though, they'll go out. And they will say how much for we need 500 email boxes are 50 email boxes, how much do you want to charge how much you charge for that. And so we'll quote it, but we don't just quote as email box, because we know we're going to have to do support, we're going to have to back up those email boxes, we're probably going to want to run their email through our high-end filter, before we send it to Microsoft, because Microsoft's email filters are nowhere near as useful. We're going to want to do all of this stuff. And backup restore, we're going to have to account maintenance and everything. And so they say, oh, wow, well, this guy wants like a 10th of what you want, and you know, the answer is, yeah, they're not doing anything near what we're doing. And you're going to get stung. And in fact, this client did this once before, and another product and they got hurt, badly. Okay, so you've, you've got to watch that it is a huge deal that you do not want to get involved with, you know, it's just crazy. So now, this is how this all ties in this breach at PCM. They lost all the administrative credentials for their 2000 business clients. Now, Microsoft will require multifactor authentication for their cloud solution providers. And these are the guys that help companies manage their office 365 accounts to see what's going on here. It sounds like PCM, a $2.2 billion-dollar company was not keeping their clients record safe. That is huge. Now we use multifactor authentication for everything we possibly can we go further than that. And we use these little keys that are encryption keys that we have to put into the devices to even be able to log in. If you remove that key, that physical key, the system shuts off, all access is blocked.

At Mainstream, we keep all of our client confidential stuff highly encrypted digital containers and only decrypt a record when we need it for the client. Microsoft requires that all its cloud solution providers, meet those same standards.

Today's show can be found at Craig Peterson dot com.

The sponsor of today's show is Craig Peterson's Security Summer Summit. Make sure you attend the summit. Make sure you sign up for the list — and this absolutely free summit. You can find out tons of stuff security summer, go to Craig Peterson dot com, sign up for my emails, and we will talk with you guys later in the week. Take care, everybody. Bye-bye.

--- 

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--- 

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

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Jul 16, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath this Monday morning. Jack was extremely interested in some military tech he saw in the news and the future of tech as it related to AI and medical robotics, so that is what we talked about today. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

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Worried About Privacy? Steve Wozniak says Delete Facebook

Got Chinese Security Cameras? Just Try to Remove them.

---

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/15/2019

Flying Soldiers, AI, Robots

Craig Peterson

Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson, here. I was on with Jack Heath this morning talking about something that this was not in my weekly newsletter, right? If you get that my show notes for my weekly newsletter, in fact, I haven't even got it sent out today. It's been so busy, so busy. My brother came down with his wife and kids, late last week, and we helped them out with a few different things. It was, quite lovely to visit with them, but it threw my whole schedule off. So, you're going to be getting my weekly newsletter a little bit late this week. It was a crazy week. Earlier last week, I was down in DC, and with all of the stuff I've been doing it has been a busy time. So this morning, I got to talk with Jack about some of the futurist stuff. I don't know if you saw on the coverage of the Bastille Day celebrations over in Paris, and the guy on a kind of a board, kind of like you would see going down on Hill, a ski hill, but he was flying over Paris. Very, very cool technology. We talked about the future, and where's it going?
We discussed how artificial intelligence would impact us as we move forward as well as one or two other things right along those lines, including a small local entrepreneur who owns a limo service and the way he's fighting back against Uber and Lyft. So, it was a fun conversation this morning. I am getting ready, of course, for my security summer summit and they sponsoring today's podcast. Security summer is all about you learning the things you need to know about security. It is good for your business, for your home, and if you are a CEO, we have an exclusive track for you as a business owner as well. So keep an eye on your email box will be sending out notifications about that soon. And you can sign up just by going to Craig Peterson dot com. All right, guys. Here we go.

Jack Heath
So this is pretty cool. The Flying soldier its called and it is pretty cool and maybe the stuff of the future but Craig Peterson his show airs Saturday mornings Tech Talk, and he joins us live now, Good morning, Craig.

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning. Yeah, Bastille Day is quite a celebration there in Paris. Is he soaring over the streets? It's kind of cool to think about, you know, we've been promised for how many years from James Bond that we would all have these jetpacks, right or at least flying cars. And somehow it just hasn't happened for any of us. There's also another interesting article, I don't know if you saw this in the union leader, but a local Manchester couple owns a limo service. And he was lobbying the state to try and get some restrictions on ride-sharing services. So he decided, hey, if you can beat them, join them. And he has started a new app called ride links RYDELIMX. And then hoping that that's going to compete with ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft. But one of the main differences is it allows the driver to set the price. And you know, that's kind of a bit of an innovative thing for them to do. With Uber, the many people I know that that drive for Uber are not happy with the company and some of them have shifted over to Lyft. With this, there is now gives them another opportunity.

Jack Heath
Interesting, but I want to go back to the flying jet pack. You can imagine down the road like Hey, what are you doing this weekend, I'm going to just literally going to fly up and go skiing this afternoon is going to fly up and go through the notch and my jetpack just going to you know, go. Justin's going to be I mean, it's pretty cool video, have you seen it?

Justin McIsaac
I have. But you know, this isn't going to go very far. So I can let you go up to the mountains.

Craig Peterson
But they're a little bit ridiculous. But you know, this one, but there are about a half a dozen companies right now, Jack, who are making various types of personal transportation planes if you will. Most of them use electric power to charge them up. They're suitable for give-or-take an hour of flight. And they are being automated. The FAA is responsible for setting up flight rules for some of these things. They are trying to figure out how do we handle this. NASA is involved with some of the technology too. Currently, anyone could apply for a license like you would your driver's license, and with just a few hours worth of training, would be able to fly some of these. They're expecting them they hit the skies, certainly by 2025. And maybe a little bit earlier. So you could hop in your plane no matter where you are in the states fly up north in the wintertime, be up there in a matter of about 45 minutes or so and have the plane fly itself the whole way. It's that it's finally going to happen.

Jack Heath
I imagined it would and in one of our movers and shakers episodes, had a guest who's a futuristic type thinker, and he was talking about them and come back to it. But just on the personal jetpack things with a battery that you want to make. It's big. What do you want to make sure it's charged? Because if you're out there, and it doesn't work, I don't know how well the parachute works. Do you follow me? Is it hard to pull over? And like 2500 feet, right? Yeah. But um, you know, yeah, there's a gentleman that was in Florida. And he was on our movers and shakers show and one of these upcoming episodes. And his big thing was how AI really over the next 15 trying to think of the years less than 20 years. So the AI of what it's going to do to our workforce. And you know, well beyond just like automatic checkouts at the supermarket. We're talking transforming industries, not all good because you know, the reduction of jobs, but impact things in our lives that you don't think about whatever happened in our lives are going to happen. So you're very much right about that.

Craig Peterson
Well, and it's going to be huge, because there are alternate opinions on that Jack where they're saying, if you look at machine learning, Ai, right now, it has created three times as many jobs as it has eliminated. And so there's either futurists are looking at this saying we look back years ago, right when we had steam coming in, and we had cars, motorized cars, and all of these ended up creating more jobs, and they eliminated. But ultimately, I think what we need is, and I think Justin would agree with us like a Star Trek universe if we can turn energy into matter. And then we have the ability, and we have unlimited power, we can have a society where anyone can do almost anything they want to because everything is effectively free. And hopefully, we'll get to that point. But AI itself, yeah, it's going to eliminate a lot of the first jobs. But it is ultimately going to create a lot of jobs to disruption, I think, is probably the name of the game for the next 50 years, frankly, but Jack has not always been the case.

Craig Peterson 7:16
Yeah, it takes a while. But you know what, what, what I've found interesting is you could take the number of aging Americans who live alone. And as they age and get older, you know, nursing homes have been had been such an expensive thing for families. I'm reading and seeing some stories, where a small robot in a home can be beneficial. Now you see Alexa or something on the table, you can talk to it and play this or do something, but a small robot that has other capabilities like to speak to you with maybe daily instructions in an entertaining way. Or even do some functions around the house, will change the entire nursing home industry. You're going to go into some fast-food restaurants, and then maybe one human being working and five robots, not just at the checkout area, but preparing your food and hence to medical.

Jack Heath
The medical industry, you know, more procedures are going to be done by robots, you know, then surgical assistance. Yeah, well,

Craig Peterson
That's going to happen to and but it's also going to allow us to have an expert in a foreign city, do surgery, etc. But Amazon has a prototype of something called the vest, its a robot. And this thing's waist-high, it can be summoned by voice. Amazon's have already invested very heavily into robots. And Bloomberg is reporting right now that this investor robot is going to do what you were talking about Jack, it's going to be in the system for people who are at home who are aging and who may have various types of capabilities that are limited. Amazon revealed that this whole interest is frankly not only in prototype right now, but they're hoping to have it out within the next year. It should be in our homes. So yeah, you're again, you're spot on Jack, this is going to be huge. The robots as far as surgery goes, that is still a ways away but using robotic assistance, so that you can have a world-class surgeon perform surgery is going to be a big deal. As you may know, I was in emergency medicine for ten years as a volunteer, and the ability then to have a surgeon as we have right here in New Hampshire at any of our Southern central hospitals or out on the Seacoast. The ability to have those types of surgeons available and doctors available, who can then examine a patient in some small rural community in northern New Hampshire and even treat them, that's coming very, very quickly. We already have some of that technology and with the physical feedback, where the robot is remotely-controlled, but the doctor can feel exactly what that robot is feeling, right Palpate and do various things. Man, I'm so looking forward to some of this feature.

Jack Heath
I can tell. All right, thanks, Craig. Appreciate it, right. Don't fight it. Embrace it. All right. That was some tech talk. And we come back to the tropical storm.

Craig Peterson
By the way, just pointed out that if you want to sign up, right now for my regular email list. So if you're not already on my list, you can subscribe by going to Craig Peterson dot com at the top of the page. There is a little subscribe link that you can just put in your name and email. And I'll let you know when it happens. I'll also be sending you my weekly security notes, show notes, whatever you might want to call it. People call it different things right as I try and keep you up to date on the most important happenings in the world of technology and security, although I do produce exclusive newsletters for security, those are a paid subscription. Anyhow, we'll I'll talk to you tomorrow. Bye-bye.

---

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Jul 3, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and guest host Erik Lusk. This morning we talked about Apps and how bad they are, Why you should not use Android, Backups why they are really important now.  and what could happen in the future? 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/03/2019

---

Craig Peterson
Hi everybody, Craig Peterson here. Oh my gosh, Independence Day. I want to say Happy Independence Day to everybody out there. Happy Canada Day to everybody who, of course, is from Canada. Some grand celebrations are coming up in France this summer, as well as the UK and all over the world. So, you know, let's give peace a chance as they say, right. Today I was on with my friends Ken Altshuler and Eric Lusk, and I gave Eric a bit of a kidney punch. I talked a little bit about an email I got from the FBI this week and talking about some of the security problems with Android. I am afraid I went on a bit of a rant here, you know, the whole 76% of mobile apps having flaws, security flaws, the Iranian cyber attacks against the United States. And we got into it today. At least I did. They could hardly get a word in edgewise. Anyways, here we go. Have a great week, guys, and I'll be back on Saturday. Bye-bye.

Ken Altshuler
And it's 738 on Wednesday Morning News. Eric is sitting in for Matt Gagnon, who is taking a few days off. Jeremy Fisher 'll join you after the eight o'clock news with an eye on politics but as usual on Wednesday, 738 none other than Professor Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins us. Good morning, Mr. Peterson, how are you?

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning, doing well. I love this kind of weather. It is why I live up here. It's just like you were saying. Right?

Ken Altshuler
Exactly.

Craig Peterson
I like a warm day, frankly, in the 80s. Maybe a little much. It's a beautiful beach day. But I'm not into the humidity and not into the 90 plus degree weather and everything else. I enjoy this.

Ken Altshuler
Well, you're in the right place. Enjoy it until winter starts in a couple of weeks.

Craig Peterson
Yeah.

Ken Altshuler
It's right around the corner. Winter is coming. Mr. Peterson,

Eric Lusk
You'll notice the days are getting shorter.

Ken Altshuler
Exactly right.

Craig Peterson
Well, you're not going to notice it quite yet. It speeds up a little bit, later on. Right now. We're only losing just you know, a few seconds every day but it does accelerate. Winter is, you know, the winter isn't so bad either. You know.

Ken Altshuler
There's no good winter, you're wrong. There's no nice way to put it, winter, I mean no way to put a nice spin on it. But no winter is not good.

Craig Peterson
Well, I look at it this way can I can always put on another layer of clothes in the wintertime. I cannot take off my skin in the summer.

Ken Altshuler
But you don't need to. You can be basking in the warmth in the heat. I am from Oklahoma, so you're talking to the wrong person.

Craig Peterson
Oklahoma's nasty. They have the worst of both, right.

Ken Altshuler
But that heat is super. It's like being in a SPAAA..


Ken Altshuler
So let's get into the tech issues. You gave us a lot of tech issues that I didn't know where to start. I went to the one where 76 percent of mobile apps have flaws that allow hackers to steal passwords, money, and tech. So what my iPhone, these people can go on and steal my passwords. You tell me.

Craig Peterson
Here's the problem, I, in fact, I just forwarded an email to some friends, I'll have to send it out to my whole email list here on as part of this weekend's email that I send out. I sent out this email. It was a summary that I get from law enforcement from the FBI because of what I do with the FBI and Infragard running their webinar programs. On it was just a note that said here's the Android patches for July. It went on for I don't know three or 400 words just describing the critical patches and how only Samsung is going to be releasing fixes for these patches on Android for these significant security problems with Android software. Only Samsung going to be releasing fixes for them within the probably the next60 days. These are highly critical. These are crucial, critical, patches. Other vendors, some may never release patches for them. Okay, so let's start with that in mind. Okay, Android, forget about it. If you care about security at all. Never buy Android. Now, iOS

Erik Lusk
So much for my cell phone. Exactly.

Craig Peterson
Ditch it. I can't believe you're in the financial business and you have an Android because it is the most dangerous piece of hardware available today. It's worse than Windows.

Ken Altshuler
Wow.

Craig Peterson
Okay.

Ken Altshuler
Did you hear that?

Craig Peterson
So, don't

Erik Lusk
Do you want me to turn around so you can hit the other kidney? Holy smokes!

Craig Peterson
Is he starting to spit blood yet, Ken? Okay. Sorry about that. But most people don't know this. Right? It's not your fault, Erik. Some vendors are pretending Androids just fine. Right? So how do you know who to trust? I'm not blaming you for this, and it's why I get so upset with the antivirus software, people selling things like Android phones and tablets, televisions with built-in things like how webOS. Samsung said two weeks ago, don't forget to run an antivirus on your TV. Who knows this stuff? Right? The bottom line is, don't use Android ever. Stick with iOS. Going back to Ken's point here, where 76% of mobile apps, according to positive technologies analysis here, 76% of mobile apps have flaws that can allow hackers to steal the passwords, maybe even your money and texts. Okay. Yeah, there is not a device if it has power going to it, If it has a wire going to it - the potential is there that it can be hacked, okay. So Deal with it, bottom line. Poorly written iOS applications are going to use cloud services other than Apple. Now Apple, again, their cloud services are outstanding. However, many of these cloud services, look at the Amazon breaches, we just had another huge one yesterday, that affected TD Bank, according to the reports, they were using a third party contractor. In other words, if you are a business, think about this for a couple of minutes, you're giving your data to who? To salesforce.com to this cloud service. Do you know how good is this cloud provider's security? Many of these apps that we're using are going to the cloud, they're using cloud services, many of the vendors that are upstream from us are taking some of our data, and they're not protecting it. So I, man, I just, I can't emphasize this enough. It's terrible. It's but it's the way of the world, and it's going to continue to be the way the world. That's why I'm hosting my security summer. This summer, I have a six-week program, one hundred percent free for everybody. I want everybody to know what to do because the vendors out there are not telling you the truth. Okay. That's the bottom line. They're selling new software that they have because they have it. Right. They're not selling you solutions that solve basic things, and you need to do those first. It's brass tacks of what you need to do to keep your data safe. It's like you were talking about with distracted driving. Who can afford the latest version of Apple's Car Play? The new one that is just coming out with right now is phenomenal. Android has a similar thing. But again, I don't want you to use Android devices for distracted driving. Who can afford to pay somebody like me to help them? Well, you know, bigger businesses, obviously, Ken, right. The medium-sized companies and larger small businesses can come in, and I can secure it. There are so many defense contractors working just right south here at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard that has to have to be DFARS compliance, which is a federal regulation. But they don't know where they can go? How about the little guys that can't afford to hire the real security people that all they do is networks and security. That's what this security summer is all about, guys. If people want to find out more, listen, you got to get ahold of me, I'm more than glad to put you into this class. It's only 10 to 15 minutes sessions twice a week, during the summer. If you miss one, you can watch it on the replay you need to email me at Craig Peterson dot com if you want to be in it and I'll let you know when it starts, okay, this isn't selling new stuff. It is just getting down to the brass tacks and making sure that those are out of the way. Many of these things you can do are free. Some of them are just educational, but they need to know what to do and how to do it. And then some you might want to or need to buy some paid software. I'll tell you what to do. But email me at Craig Peterson dot com. It's not as though I care about this stuff. Guys. I don't want you to think I'm on a soapbox or anything. Okay.

Erik Lusk
Just a wee bit.

Craig Peterson
Oh, yea.

Ken Altshuler
But a good soapbox

Erik Lusk
Oh, yeah, absolutely! When the city of Baltimore was held hostage by some computer hackers that managed to figure out how to shut down the municipal website. That's no way to live. What's next shutting down our Public Utilities?

Craig Peterson
You don't? Yeah, well, that's what's happening right now. And maybe that was a cue for me right there. We had this whole thing with Iran, right, they shot down our drone. That was or was not in international waters, Right. So our response was to be in a posture to bomb bomb bomb bomb bomb Iran. Right. Then President Trump called it off at the last minute, right? It is all that we're getting from the news. And then the part that most people haven't been talking about is apparently, President Trump's idea of, hey, listen, you didn't kill anybody in the plane, we don't want to kill anybody. Then in a reciprocal response was that we hacked and shut down their radars, missile radar systems and their missile sites. Their answer is what's happening now with Iran going after our US businesses. They've got some software that wipes your computer. If they get on to your business computers, what they want to do is cause problems with the US economy. Most businesses just are protected well enough. They've got some a break-fix shop that knows a little bit about security and certainly can install the software. And those are, you know, Wow, those are the experts. And so Life is good, right? Hey guys that is not the case. Now we've got Homeland Security coming out this last week here, and warning businesses that Iranian hackers are already targeting US companies. And they're using this wipe software. They're not holding your data ransom, they are wiping clean your computers and anything they can find on your network, rather than stealing the data. That's directly from Chris Krebs. He's the director of Homeland Security's Cyber Security Division

Erik Lusk
Isn't that an easier thing to do? Rather than to go in and steal the data, isn't it easier to just wipe out somebody's data altogether?

Craig Peterson
That's the easiest thing to do. And you know what, Eric, there are no fingerprints afterward, Right? Or should I say a very few fingerprints? So for instance, we've gone into companies, we went into one company, and we found that there were Chinese back doors installed. It was a small manufacturer. And they made some dumb parts, right? There's like you think of a screw. Well, who cares about a screw. And the Chinese had multiple back doors, and they were monitoring everything that was going on. But that screw eventually ended up in our military equipment, until the Chinese went after the little guy. It made it now easier, and they had access to the portal to the big defense contractor, etc., etc. So that was very easy to trace because we could see wherever these back doors were talking to how they were accessed. We worked with the FBI, and we were able to straighten it out very quickly, we got them back in business within 24 hours. However, when you're just wiping a computer, there is nothing left because they've completely wiped the silly thing. So yeah, Eric, that's what they're doing because it is the easiest thing to do. That's part of what we're going to do with the security summer the right ways to do backups. And I can tell you 90% of the people I've ever talked to probably really close to 100 are not doing backups properly. But I don't want people to feel bad. A good backup that works can recover your data from that wipe from the Iranians. It can also recover your data from any ransomware attacks coming. Many of those are from Russia. We have one client, and we were looking at their website the other day and the security mechanisms we have in place. Their website was getting attacked five times every second it was a little website. It's crazy. And it was coming straight from Russia, by the way, anyways, blah, blah. I'm going to long in this segment. But there's so much you have to know to do it right. Just email me at Craig Peterson dot com. I want to get you in this. It is free. It's for small-medium businesses. If you're just the IT person because you know the most or you like computers, and "tagged your it" right, like in the game of tag. It is for you. And it's free. And I want you to attend email me at Craig Peterson dot com.


Ken Altshuler
Great. Craig Peterson dot com and Craig joins us every Wednesday. 738. Craig, we hope you have a great Fourth of July. We'll talk to you next week.

Erik Lusk
So much for my cell phone. I guess I'm headed over to get something else.

Ken Altshuler
iPhone time. iPhone time. Yeah.

Craig Peterson
Have a great Independence Day, everybody.

Erik Lusk
Thanks, Joe. All right, we'll take a break for CBS News, and we'll be back after this.

---

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Jul 2, 2019

Craig was on with Dan Ferrantino sitting in for Jim Polito. We talked in some detail about some of the things that are going on right now. Did you know that there are retaliatory strikes from Iran going on right now? Unfortunately, they are aiming them directly at your business? We went through some of the details of that what you can do. I gave some real-world examples and solution.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Trumping Iranian Aggression 

Is Your App Safe? Maybe Not!

Are You Ready? Iranian Cyber Counter Attacks

--- 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/02/2019

Iran, Russia, Boeing and Keeping Safe 

Craig Peterson
Good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here. I was on with Danny this morning because Jim is on vacation. We talked in some detail about some of the things that are going on right now. Did you know that there are retaliatory strikes from Iran going on right now? Unfortunately, they are aiming them directly at your business? We went through some of the details of that what you can do. I gave some real-world examples and solution. So here we go with Danny.

Danny Ferrantino
That music means it is Tuesday morning and our tech talk guru, Craig Peterson is joining us. Good morning, Craig.

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning Danny. Good job,

Danny Ferrantino
I try and try and try. You're kind enough to send us the show notes early. Looking through the show notes. There seems to be kind of one correlation between all of the topics. Everyone's out to get me, buddy.

Craig Peterson
That's the bottom line. It isn't just the government coming after you for tax money. Now we're not only supporting the some of these people who are on welfare, maybe down on their luck, etc. We're also supporting people living in Eastern European countries, their entire families, extended families. There is one story from last year, or maybe it's two years ago now, this lady over there in Eastern Europe. She did what's called from doxxing. That begins with figuring out a little bit about some companies she found a guy who was at a Facebook page had a LinkedIn profile. She found out that he was the president of this company. You know, a midsize, a small, medium-sized company. After finding out more about the guy, she sent a link a LinkedIn to him, and a Facebook request friend request saying remember me back from school, you know, using the information she had she knew what school he went to because he posted it online. She did some more research on the business website. Of course on the business website, it says, here's the CEO. Here's the CFO here, all of my top guys and gals. She researches them, find out more information about them. She spent time watching the CEO and followed him for a while. She found out he was going on vacation to the Bahamas, not the D.R. Okay. So he will probably come back alive. She figured out okay, well, this is when he's going on vacation. By the way, criminals breaking entering now, robberies at homes home invasions are also using the same technique. They know when you're gone during the summer time because you post it on social media, and they use that all online information to figure out who you are? If you might have good assets, and then they break into your house while you're gone. Because you told them you're going away for a week.


Danny Ferrantino
Yep, I got it.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, exactly. In this case, the CEO is out on vacation, and he's pretty unreachable. She has found out what his email addresses, calls up, and gets his password reset. Yes, this takes a while to explain all of this. But it only takes about two-three days worth of work. She sends in an email off to the CFO saying posing as the CEO, "Hey, we got this new vendor, they're critical. We haven't paid them in three months". "If we don't send them the money right now, they're going to cut us off, or our manufacturing is going to shut down in the business. I need you to wire this money, Right now.

Danny Ferrantino
I see where this is going.

Craig Peterson
She got the CFO to wire $45 million out of the country. Now, the FBI is saying that, and the secret service as well, in the briefings I've had with them that it only takes 90 seconds for all that money to be unreachable almost guaranteed. It was in this case, as well. She's supporting not only herself the rest of her life, her family and her the extended family the rest of her life, and it is all because of what people are posting on social media. What we're doing with our devices.? So if you go to my company and mainstream dot net online, Danny, there is an Officer's page like everybody else has. Right? You've seen them here's our senior staff. So you go to that page. But ours is quite different, and it says due to security concerns, we're not telling you, sucker. That's what we need to start doing ourselves with our data with our businesses and our business data. Because they are out to get you, Danny,

Danny Ferrentino
Everyone thinks that you know, you want to be all-inclusive, and let everyone know and try to sell yourself online. More times than not that can come back to hurt you as you just discussed.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, look at how great we are. We have all these attorneys here from H-A-AR- VARD, you know, they have Native American blood and all these other things that you want to highlight. However, bragging about them, now, in this day and age can be dangerous. Even in press releases, we used to say a lot more than we say now because they are using it against us. I regularly see businesses, small businesses, here's another one where they had about $80,000 that was stolen right out of their operating account. Now, that's money that they need to stay in business. A group operating out of China took it, and it was, obviously, a big deal. The company spent 10s of thousands of dollars flying over to Hong Kong, trying to file police report trying to get their money back and they never did.

Craig Peterson
Now we've got this thing going on with President Trump and Iran. Of course, there was a whole thing in place, and we're going to bomb bomb bomb bomb bomb Iran. If you remember the early 80s, that little ditty. And he pulled it back. And what did he do instead? I don't know if you follow this. But he decided, here's what we're going to do. It wasn't reasonable. They shot down an unmanned drone, and it was not a reasonable response for us to drop bombs and maybe kill 150 people. Well, in what he did instead was he launched a cyber attack against Iran. It is all from what we can gather and public statements and everything. He began a cyber attack against the Iranian infrastructure that controls the missiles that launch the missiles. Also, do you remember this thing with Russia and the power plant? Where we flicked Russia's lights on and off a few times to let them know we were in their systems.

Danny Ferrentino
Hey just to let you know, we're here. Yeah.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, exactly. So now Iran has started attacking. They've increased their attacks now, primarily on our businesses, because they're trying to hurt our economy. They're using some special malicious software designed to wipe the contents of your computer. They're not going to bother holding it ransom. They want to put you out of business. It is straight from the Homeland Security Department. We have to be careful now. The Homeland Security is warning us that there's been a dramatic increase in Iranian hacking, and what are we doing, Danny? Our businesses are not protected. It's crazy. It's like 95% of our companies are easily penetrated. They have said that two-thirds of all companies in the SMB space will be compromised this year. That's what they're expecting. Two-thirds. And we're not doing enough about it, too.

Danny Ferrentino
We're talking with our tech talk Guru, Craig Peterson. Craig. Now, this isn't new with the hacking the cybersecurity. Why is it that people are just so far behind the eight-ball on something like this? People like you that are out here telling us we need to do something. Is it people don't care? Is that they don't believe it's going to happen to them?

Craig Peterson
Well, I, I talked to a lot of people, as you know, because I run these webinars for the FBI Infragard program. And I have a lot of clients, up pick up new clients every week, and help them out. And so here's what I hear the most right? It is confusing. It is overwhelming. They feel like they have no control over it, and there is nothing they can do. None of which is true, by the way. But at the same time, I also think that they have legitimate reasons to feel that way. You know, the software they bought, they bought Norton Antivirus and so they're all set. They purchased this Symantec software or whatever. Both companies, by the way, have had employees, high up like the CEO or Executive V.P., saying their software is useless today. I can't blame these companies for feeling that way. So I'm trying to help people I know there's a lot of businesses that can't afford to hire me. So, Danny, what I'm doing this summer for everybody that's on my email list, everyone who's on my text list is going to get an invite, I'm going to be doing a dozen 15-minute if you will give or take, webinars. It's my security summer. It's 100% free for anyone who wants to attend. We're going to go through the brass tacks of what you need to do, the basics, let's get back to the basics. Let's make sure you're securing your stuff, let's find out what the data you have, what your data assets are of your small business and medium business and what you need to protect them. I'm going to help people understand this. And, you know, I've got my fingers crossed, that we're going to help move that needle. I've helped a lot of businesses, over 5000 so far, move the needle. I am doing this for my listeners. As you were mentioning earlier today, 76% of mobile apps have flaws, that are allowing hackers to steal passwords, to get into bank accounts to find your texts and things. What this goes back to the unprofessional nature the people who are writing software. Did you see what came out about Boeing? Sorry, I am rambling a bit. On Boeing with their 737 Max 8, did you hear what came out yesterday? The software in the Boeing jet has that is having problems right now. It turns out some of that software had been written by software developers in India, who earned $9 an hour? You know, it's, how do you know how good that software is? Do they do proper code reviews? Do they have the senior people in place that understand the security implications, that understand all of the flight systems? You can't fix a problem with a computer if you don't understand all of the components involved? So I, I put a lot of blame on some of these businesses trying to save money on the bottom line. They are not hiring the experienced technical people, and I know a few people, quite a few that, that have significant experience programming and managing projects for 30 years that are having some trouble finding work. Why? They want to hire the young kid, is it going to be with them for the next 30 years, right? It's a, what do they call that, where you're you're not going to hire an older person, age discrimination.

Danny Ferrantino
You've got to have the experience. They don't know what they're doing, Craig. And so that's why there are so many of these issues nowadays with these either be poorly written code, or poorly written security measures or whatever else. And unfortunately, a lot of our cyber enemies are picking up on this.

Craig Peterson
Very, very true. I blame Microsoft. Here's why. Okay, you know how easy it is to program. Nowadays, it's drag and drop. It's like, if you want to build the car, you pull this transmission off the shelf, and you put it on top of this frame. Nothing by that you had to bolt together, by the way, you drop them on, and all the parts fit together. But when something happens, all you have is a red light on the dashboard, and you have no idea it's a problem with the transmission the drive, train somewhere, right. Or maybe you have a low tire. Bill Gates made it so easy for so many years for people to write software. And on one side, it's terrific, I'm glad that he's done that because we've got some great software because of it. But, on the other hand, we are now surrounded by people that are considered professionals. Look at the average small business their I.T. person is whoever likes computers the most. They I.T. professionals, they haven't worked at all these different levels. That's what the whole security summer is going to be about. I'm going to let everybody know. So you can attend you'll know which sessions There are so that you can go the ones that apply to you the most I'm not charging a dime, but for this, okay, so it's simple. I'm trying to get this information I'm trying to help the Small Business/medium business that says to an employee you're my computer gal now because you like computers the most. This security thing, as you pointed, out is enormous. We've got nation states coming after us who realize what our weaknesses are. Right now we've got Iran coming after our businesses, massively, as a retaliatory strike.


Danny Ferrantino
Well, Craig, as always, great stuff and now that you've scared me straight,

 

---

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Jul 1, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath this Monday morning. I spoke with Jack about the importance of getting back to the basics of cybersecurity and why it is so important.  We also discussed the necessity in regard to some of the political happenings around the world in re the Iranians and Russians.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles 

Are You Ready? Iranian Cyber Counter Attacks

Cyber Breaches - How far does your liability extend?

Trumping Iranian Aggression 

---

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 07/01/2019

Getting back to basics and Iranian and Russian Hacking

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here. We are getting ready for our security summer summit. It's going to be multiple times a week, twice a week you can attend the live broadcast, or you can also go ahead and get yourself a golden ticket if you'd like to, to be able to go through it all at your schedule.

This summer, we are getting back to the brass tacks, the basics of what you need to do, we're going to tell you all of the basics. And that's what the security summers summit is all about. Make sure you keep an eye out for that announcement or send an email to me at Craig Peterson dot com if you're interested in participating. As I said, it is free. I get concerned about people who don't have the money and are, you know, really need help.

Man, it seems like everybody needs this in my 30 years of doing computer security stuff, I have never been in a business where we did an audit, or we took over their IT or their security that did not have security problems, no matter what, No matter how good their people supposedly were. I know there are smaller companies out there that can't afford to pay for one of my more prominent courses. So this is free. Now you can upgrade right if you want to, but the content will be free. I want to help everybody out, I want to make this affordable, and affordable equals free. However, we are going to make it available, as well via the golden ticket so that if you want to get the whole security summer and keep a copy, you can. The security summer information is going away right as soon as the summer's over and we're only leaving the individual classes up for a week. So once the summer's over, it'll just be gone unless you upgrade to the golden ticket. But you have a week to watch each one of these videos. And I think it's important to, to watch them and to pay attention. And I'm doing the one-week thing because if there is no motivation, we have so many things going on, that will say hey, listen, I'll do this in three weeks, I'll do it at the end of the summer, I'll have time in September. And it never gets done. However, this is one of the most critical things you can do for your family and your business. If you get breached, man, oh man and not just hacked, but you get one of these new zero-day attacks. Or maybe it's something like Equifax had, the patches have been out for more than six months, and they hadn't done the updates they needed to do. Any of those things can cause great heartache on your part. If your business you might be put you out of business. We've got some new statistics will be talking about coming out of some further studies showing how things have gotten worse, but how it will affect you. So all of that's part of our security summer, it's going to be free. Send email to me at Craig Peterson dot com. We'll have a sign up ready, pretty shortly, probably next week for you and I'll give you that link. If you want to kind of poke around, it's going to be at security summer.com. How's that for simple, right? It's not there yet. But we're putting it up. It's going to be me teaching a lot of this stuff. We're going to have a few guest people on talking about things talking about their hardware and software and how it works so that you can make some informed decisions about what you might want to use. Security Summer summit.com. That's where it'll be. Anyhow, here we go.

This morning, I was on with Mr. Jack Heath. And as usual, we talked about a couple of different things, including a big security alert came up from the NSA this week. And I went off at a bit of a tangent too, because I thought it was necessary. So here we go with Jack.

Jack Heath
All right, Craig Peterson on Tech Talk guy on this Monday morning. And Craig. Good morning. How are you?

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning doing well.

Jack Heath
Good. What's, what do we have this morning on our tech talk side? You always tell us how to avoid being
victims of scam or spam, or you name it.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, precisely and per usual a lot is going on out there. Well, you might remember about 18 months ago, the world one of the worst attacks ever hit the world. It brought down significant corporations, government offices a terrible thing. Well, we've got some significant warnings out there right now. Even the NSA has stepped in and been providing some additional notices. I want to warn everybody I know this sounds like a broken record. Right? Make sure you're patched up. But we have something even newer. Iran has been in the news, of course, a lot recently. We just had a break in that was attributed to the Iranians, their bad tech guys, their hacker groups, and the Iranian tools ended up getting released. Now you might remember back a little while when someone stole the NSA tools and released them for hacking as well. And you might think that these incidences are dropping off Jack. But they are accelerating. We're getting more and more government involved now, as well as organized crime hacking each other. Then we had just over the weekend, President Trump coming out and talking about the New York Times, saying that what they did was traitorous when they came out and said that we the United States hacking Russian power plant, and been putting malware into them. This whole thing is getting crazy. But it's just the very beginning. Jack.

Jack Heath
Yeah, there's been some reports over the weekend on that. And of course, you know, I this again, it seems that we're not going to be able to, you know, I don't see how you can stop it. Speaking of the power grid, I'm not saying it was any malware but in Argentina, the 10s of millions of people without power in the in the dark because of a problem with their grid. Such scary stuff. All right, Craig, anything else before we let you get on with your Monday?

Craig Peterson
Well, I want to say to everybody, get back-back to the brass tacks here. That's what matters. Get back to the basics. Make sure you're patching, make sure you're up to date, that's going to help protect you. But we got some cool stuff going on as well.

There is some more news about the autonomous systems that are out there. And I've got a couple of articles about that up on my website as well like Craig Peterson dot com.

Jack Heath
Craig, thanks for the Tech Talk check-in. Thank you, Craig Peterson.

Craig Peterson
Take care, Jack

Craig Peterson
All right, everybody, it is not up yet. It will be up soon. But you can always email me at Craig Peterson dot com, we'll make sure you find out about this. Again, utterly free training this summer. You can upgrade and get the whole summit if you want to keep it, as well. It's available for free because I want to get this information out to as many people as we possibly can. Because it's that important. Yes, it is. So security summer summit.com is where it will be it's not there yet. We just man. Busy year. Take care, everybody. Be back tomorrow.

 

---

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Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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Jun 29, 2019

 

Did the Apollo moon landings happen?. Yes they did! Listen in to find out how it is provable 50 years later.

Are we in a Cyberwar with Iran? Unfortunately, yes and why you might get caught in the crossfire.

Business Productivity, for many it means the use of Third Party Software and Cloud Services.  But is it safe?  How to protect yourself. 

Visual hacking and why it is putting Business travelers at risk.

I am planning a Security Summer for my listeners.  I will have some free courses.  I will also introduce you to some of the software that I use for my clients and how you can use it too.  Also, I have some limited opportunities for businesses who have had enough with their security issues to work with me and my team and put their security problems to rest once and for all.   So watch out for announcements on those.

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript: 

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/29/2019

Did the Apollo moon landings happen?. Yes they did! Are we in a Cyberwar with Iran? What you need to know the risks with third party contracts.

----

Hello, everybody and welcome. Of course, this is Craig Peterson, your host for the next give or take 27 minutes, we're going without commercial interruption again. We are going to be talking about some of the details of our digital lives. With the 50th anniversary of the moon landing coming up, we wanted to go through some of the facts about that event because for some odd reason a lot of people seem to be confused about what took place. It's kind of amazing to me because I remember it so well like it was yesterday. It's incredible to me to think that more than half of the people alive today were not even alive when the moon landing occurred. That's just a matter of perspective, right?

We'll talk a bit about the cybersecurity gap. There was an article with some interesting observations in Forbes magazine this past week about it.

We will discuss some flaws in both iOS and Android apps, and it might surprise you, but there are security flaws in almost as many iOS apps from Apple, as Android and I will tell you why and what those are.

We have some new Mac malware that's out there right now, and it is an interesting one because it could go both ways. You could call this a user error. Or you might want to call it a security problem that Apple has, or maybe one Apple created. However, it is behaving the way it's was designed to work.

This week, I did a big presentation for a University of New Hampshire mastermind group of CEOs. We were talking about the most significant cyber liabilities, and I shared that more than 60 percent of your theft is coming from inside. From inside I mean, those with authorized access which includes all Third Party Contractors. So we'll talk a little bit about that.

If you travel for business, 3M has a couple of stark warnings for business travelers.

Oh my, we've got to talk about this, the U.S. launched a cyber attack against Iran, instead of beginning with a kinetic strike. We'll talk a little bit about some significant implications to you and your business because of that.

Then a little bit more here about liability for a data breaches and we will talk about all of this right now. So, let's get into it.

First off liability for a data breach. As I mentioned, I had an excellent presentation this week at this mastermind group for the University of New Hampshire. There were a lot of interactive questions and comments about what I presented. It was kind of fascinating because there were several CEOs from various industries. For this group, they have a non-compete criterion that precludes the members from directly competing with each other. I belong to a mastermind group, a paid group, and they don't have that type of restriction, you have to be basically a decent person, and so there are many people in your same line of work, I kind of like that. As a general rule, there is a lot of business out there for everybody. And being able to talk to someone that speaks your language that's in your line of work, and discuss with them what's really happening is a huge deal.
After my presentation, I had a few people comment afterward, that the stories that I wove in about clients of mine, that experienced security problems and were unable to solve them themselves. They tried, obviously, but they weren't successful, because they got hacked, they got breached. I use a lot of stories with some of these things, and it is especially important when we're talking about a data breach and your liability. I didn't get to bring that up this week, but it's absolutely massive.

How significant is that liability for a data breach right now? We're talking about an average cost of over $7 million here in the U.S. The worldwide average is 3.8 million, but here in the U.S., it's about twice that. When we're discussing some of the data breaches that are going on and how they are continuing to grow, there's going to be more and more companies who are failing to assess their own systems for security flaws, realistically. That is why you need to have a third party come in. You can't trust your CIO or your in-house security person to do these types of audits, you need a third person to do it. Then once they have identified your weaknesses, you have to plug the holes. Sometimes that will also require the services of a third party do it because they know, exactly what they're doing. Many times, if you're a slightly bigger company, and you have your own I.T. staff. Then your I.T. team is going to do it. But it is something you have to think about.

When you get hacked, what are you going to do? Your data is stolen, and you are out of business or as the expression goes - your goose is cooked. There is an excellent article from Kiplinger that I have up on my website right now about this very thing. As a business owner, CEO you on the hook for any losses sustained by your clients. I spent some time in the presentation talking about insurance. And that is an essential thing to have. For your business. However, more and more of the cyber liability insurance claims are getting cut back or even denied. Why? It is because companies are not doing everything that they ought to do, those things that are listed in the insurance contract. There are two main ways that civil liability for a data breach can occur. One is finding negligence. That is determined by whether your company is aligned with other peers in your industry, and adherence to the best practices if you will. If you're not or if you could have had better protection, then yes, indeed, you may have civil financial liability. Including some of those excessive governmental fines and penalties, we've talked about on the show before. Secondly, even if you did everything that was required to prevent a data breach, it could still happen. The next stage is, did you do enough after the event to reduce the harm to the people affected? Did you notify them right away? Did you take immediate investigation remediation steps? Did you contact law enforcement? What did you do after the fact, was it considered reasonable? These are all the things we need to keep in mind as business people. Having that plan in advance can save you both time and money. I went through some of those statistics as well.

Here are some good points for everyone that this article makes and you should pay attention to. One you should have a breach coach who can help you put together your breach plan and who can run the breach response. It is crucial to get an attorney involved and involved early. Everyone should know what their roles are.

This will be part of our security summer this year. So make sure you're signed up. I will have some documents about what your plan should look like who should be involved whose responsible for each part of that process. It can make a huge, huge difference.

Here are the most liable people. If you're a consumer, and you've had your information breached pay attention to this as well because you have the other side.

As a business if:
You collect payment information for online sales,
You maintain a database of personal information on current past or prospective customers
You have employees, and you store information about employees digitally, including social security numbers, medical information (guess what you have HIPAA liability) I bet you thought those only applied to medical practice, you didn't have to worry about HIPAA, Well, you do.
You have employees,
You rely heavily on technology for daily operations( remember, you're going to be out of business, out of action for days, weeks, or even longer.)
You're located in any jurisdiction has a mandatory Breach Notification laws.

Right now, that is true of everywhere in the world. Well, in the first world countries, if you will, the United States has them. For every state, there are some federal notification laws. Depending on what type of business you have. The same is true in Canada and throughout Europe.

Be careful here, too, when you are selecting your cyber insurance coverage. What you should have, what you can expect from that cyber insurance coverage. We'll talk more about this during our security summer, if you haven't already, make sure you sign up, just go to Craig Peterson dot com. There you'll see a sign-up, come up right at the top of the homepage, and you can sign up right there. I'll let you know when the security summer starts. We're going to be covering all kinds of stuff about firewalls about backups about liabilities, CEO type things all the way through home users. What you can do, what you should do.

This week some are saying that Macs are infected with what they are calling malware. As I said, It's debatable whether it really is malware, because the software is behaving as expected. Mac OS has something now called gatekeeper, it keeps an eye on the programs on your computer, what you download where it came from and is it signed correctly?

It is used by developers to have software that you download that is then referred off-site to add additional files, to get into the database server, etc. In this particular case, that is being talked about over ZDNet, it lets you gain access to a file server, it's called an NFS server. ZDNet is calling this a security flaw I'm not so sure it's a security flaw. Apple has known about it for a month, they haven't patched it, it would be easy enough to, but it would also break a lot of good software out there. Here's the trick. If you're running a Mac, or a P.C. or anything, do not download software from sites that you are not 100% confident can be trusted. It's just that simple.

It's back to the brass tacks, right? Get right back to it. What are the brass tacks? In the security field, one of the first is: Don't click on stuff. Don't download and run software that is on your on a web browser on your computer.

Now we know President Trump said he was going to respond to the Iranian aggression and shooting down our drone. There's dispute by Iran whether or not the drone was in the Iranian airspace. There's some question about that, too, because the United States, for instance, claims a 200-mile jurisdiction. The international agreement says it's a 12-mile zone, and some are 20 miles. Well, when we're talking about the Straits of Hormuz, I think it's 12 miles at the narrowest point. Is it an international space? Technically, yes. Did Iran claim the area it was in as their own? Well, obviously, they did.

President Trump pulled out of a kinetic attack, we were ready to bomb their radar installations and their missile launching facilities. It came out this last weekend that instead we apparently we hacked them.

Now, I found something exciting about this Russian power security breach that happened a couple of weeks ago. I don't know if you heard about that. But apparently, the U.S. broke into and had control of some Russian power stations located in Russia. We flipped the lights on and off possibly a few times to let them know, Hey, guys, we're here, Quit messing around with our elections and quit messing around with some of the other stuff that is ours there. We have that capability. President Obama put some cyber offensive capabilities in place, and President Trump has really upped the game there. Apparently, what he did, and this was the report from last week weekend, is that he authorized our cybersecurity guys to attack Iran.

Now, when Russia attacked Ukraine, of course, that piece of malware spread worldwide and brought down hundreds of thousands of computers, as many were shut down, taken off the internet, and many others were held ransom because Russia did not have control over that malware. We apparently got malware into some of their missile launch systems. We were able to shut them down so that it didn't spread any farther.

It is just like when we got into their centrifuges for making bombs for their purification of uranium, that code did not get any further than the centrifuges and destroyed them. Now, we went after them.

U.S. businesses now should be ready for what's going to be a massive attack from Iran. We remember Iran doesn't have the finesse we do, they don't have all of the talents that we do. And they don't really care if they're hitting a military target or not. When it comes to CYBER WARS, these retaliatory strikes from Iran are very likely to be against pretty much anybody here in the U.S. They've already been attacking us before President Trump launched this attack, apparently against them. They've been bombarding us with software that's designed to wipe the contents of networks and computers, rather than steal their data. This is according to The Washington Post that I think is really kind of interesting. And that was from Chris Krebs, a director of the Homeland Security Department, Cyber Security Division. This means that if the Iranians get ahold of your business systems or your home system, they are going to wipe it clean. So make sure you have excellent backups. Again, if you don't make sure you attend my training here my security summer because we're going to be going over that. This is free people. It's absolutely free for anyone to attend, you can upgrade if you want to, to a paid version which will allow more access, but you're going to get all of the core information absolutely for free. Whether you're paid or not, you're going to get all the information for free. The same data, let me put it that way. Whether you decide to get the golden ticket, or just do it for free, that that's what I'm doing for the radio listeners, anyone can attend, because I want to get this information out there. Be prepared for the Iranian attack, they've already started attacking our businesses.

We've already had North Korea attack. Russia attack. I mentioned this, in fact, in that CEO presentation I gave this last week for the UNH group. It happened right here in N.H. I was looking at one of our customers, who just had a website, and was looking at their firewall because we have some very advanced firewalls sitting in front of even web servers. These firewalls that we were looking at, just for that one web server, we were logging, five attacks. That is just crazy. Five attacks from Russia. It wasn't as I said, it wasn't only five attacks from Russia, it was five attacks per second, on average, over the last I think it was 36 or 48 hours. It was just crazy how this company was getting just hammered. However, you guys already know, if you listen to me for a while about a client that we picked up, that had been having email issues. We looked into it, and we ended up bringing the FBI in, with the client's permission, because we found Chinese back doors into their systems. This is a small manufacturer who kept all of their plans, of course, electronically, all of the manufacturing stuff, etc., etc. Now, they get to compete against China, with their own designs. That just blows my mind, frankly, How could you do that? It's, ignorance, right? It's thinking you're okay.

In fact, going back to this story from Kiplinger, I was referring to earlier here, here's a great little quote from the author here, Dennis Beaver. And he says "My father is a dentist and is up in years, his office has all of his patient's record stored electronically, which he accesses from home from his laptop by leaving the server always on at the office. I mentioned this to a geeky friend who the next day, showed me dental records from my dad's office that he had hacked, he claimed to be doing this as a favor to get my father's attention about cybersecurity, and I believe him. By the way, be careful, never do that without permission, right?

There are ethical hackers in my business here, who are doing penetration testing, but we make sure we've got full consent from the company. So don't, don't just go and do this. Thus, the story goes on. "When I told Dad, and he immediately changed the password but didn't seem too bothered.

Here's another one. "I knew one fortune 500 company CFO who used the same password for over 10 years. Most think that it's a joke, but it was real and proved not so funny after his credentials were found in seven data breaches. His password was used to hack the company's email servers, spoof emails, and steal 10's of thousands of dollars without anyone noticing for months.

I picked up a client here, a local one here in the northeast who had had $80,000 taken out of their operations account. And of course, they realized that pretty quickly, but by the time they noticed it, the money was gone. Be very, very careful.

We're going to cover these things in our security summer, again, just Craig peterson.com. And subscribe right there on the homepage. And we'll let you know when that starts. Tentatively it is going to be mid-July by the looks of things right now. And we're talking about 10 to 15-minute sessions a couple of times a week. And we're going to keep them up for at least a week in case you miss it so that you can watch one of the replays a little bit later on.

Okay, man, we are almost out of time here. 76% of mobile apps have flaws, allowing hackers to steal passwords, money, and texts. These are some high-risk vulnerabilities. They're universal across Android and iOS, Android has a little bit more risk than iOS, we're talking about, but 5% higher risk. This is according to a company called positive technology. They went in and looked at some of these mobile apps, and the biggest problem is in secure data storage. So be careful about that.

Again, Cisco has an answer to that. And with iOS, it's just phenomenal. Nobody has anything like this other than Cisco.

Be very, very careful, there are products out there that could be useful to you. Remember that stored information can be stolen. You can't necessarily trust the app developers, they might be taking your data. Great article, you'll see it on my website. It is from Forbes, and this is about the cybersecurity skills gap and won't be solved in the classroom. So have a look on my website for that one.

Business travelers, something new called visual hacking, and this is from the Czech Republic, again, that's up on my website and in this morning's newsletter.

The U.S. launches a cyber attack aimed at Iranian rocket and missile systems, and we will talk a little bit about that. We've got a couple of great articles online.

I spoke about this with the UNH co mastermind this week third-party contractors. They are our weakest cybersecurity link. And they're just not being held accountable. You know, if you ask people who are the biggest cybersecurity threats out there who have talked about today, I mentioned what Russia, China, I said, North Korea mentioned Iran. And you'd be right. But those countries are the most significant foreign threats. And I, as I mentioned this week at the speech I gave this, is the real problem is internal. And by internal, I don't just mean your employees, I mean, your contractors. And that's one of the things you have to go through. When you're looking at the penetration testing, you're doing the analysis of your business and the data security.

Now from the Customs and Border Protection, I talked this on May 31. They had a breach where 100,000 people were photographed inside vehicles crossing the border and a couple of lanes and included images of the vehicle license plates, maybe some other stuff that was that stolen, it was taken through a third party contractor that was doing work for Customs and Border Patrol.

The most significant breaches of the last 10 years have also been self-inflicted. So let's look at this one. This is a significant number here. This is quoted in The Hill from Flexera. Patches were available for 86% of the vulnerabilities on the day of disclosure. In other words, when these companies came forward and told people about the hacks that had happened, at 86% of those were hacks, that didn't have to happen, because there were patches out already.

Okay, in other breaches, access was gained by compromising a third party like the vendors who we were just talking about and stealing their credentials to log into the corporate network of the eventual target.

Speaking of Target, look at Target, and back in 2013, 40 million credit cards were lost through a third party air conditioning provider that was connected to the corporate network. All the hacker had to do is break into the air conditioning system, and now they had a launch pad.

Think of what happened out in Las Vegas, beautiful big fish tank, they put a smart controller in it that would warn them when their temperature got too cold because the fish are so expensive. It was hooked up to their network, and it was compromised. That fish tank temperature control system was used as a launching pad.

We're seeing that all the time with cameras security cameras, the Office of Personnel Management was breached through Key Point government solutions. This is a third party used by the Office of Personnel Management. That third party gave China, 21 million personnel files, including the background checks conducted on top security clearances.

In2017, Australian defense subcontractor lost 30 gigabytes of highly sensitive data, including information on the drone strike for the Joint Strike Fighter program. Crazy. By the way, the software had not been updated for 12 months.

In 2018, China compromised the network of yet another defense contractor doing work for the Navy. Again, our technology, our advanced military superiority, has literally been stolen from us. Again from The Hill, in an assessment delivered to Navy SECRETARY RICHARD v. Spencer in March and reviewed by the Wall Street Journal, the Navy and its industry partners are under cyber siege by Chinese and Russian hackers.

So think about all of that when you are thinking about your business and even your home computer. Segment your networks, break them up, use good passwords, this is all stuff we're going to review in our security summer. Again, Craig Peterson dot com, you can email me, and I'll let you know when it happens. Just text Me at Craig Peterson dot com, we're going to cover all of this. I want you guys to know what to do, whether you're an individual or a small-medium business. In most companies, face it the computer guy or gal is whoever likes computers the most, or maybe the one who wanted a raise. They're not necessarily computer professionals. It is very, rare to find security professionals. We're working every day trying to keep up to date. Even though I've been doing this for 30 years, and I'm still learning stuff. So be careful when you go out and hire outside firms.

On to the Apollo program. I read a book back in the early 80s. And I marked it all up. And it was about how the lunar landing was a hoax. Hollywood has made some films about it. There are many people, and more and more kids nowadays think the whole thing was a setup. This is a great article written by Ethan Siegel. In the article, he talks a little bit about the moon landing. People are saying that the entire space program and NASA is nothing more than a hoax. Let's get go through a little bit of evidence. Number one, we can still see the evidence of the Apollo program on the moon even today. If you walk on the sand on a beach, the waves are going to level it out, and there won't be any sign that you were ever there. Right. But none of that exists on the moon.

Even in the Sahara Desert on the sand, you've got the shifting winds that shift that sand around. However, that is not the case on the moon.
We actually have pictures from regular people of the moon of the landing site, Apollo 12,14, and 17. Those have all been photographed from Earth. On the Apollo 12 landing sites. There is a ton of stuff you'll see this article from Forbes magazine. You can view all of the pictures. You can see it up on my website at Craig Peterson dot com. I have a link to a number to extensive photographic and video evidence from the Apollo missions themselves. The one I like the best is one that I am personally familiar with. This is a Lunar Laser Ranging, and there are many others. But this is one that we Ham Radio users use. We can bounce off of the moon there's a reflector that was left up there by the Apollo missions we can bounce a laser off, and we use that scientifically to figure out how far the moon is away. But there are also lunar seismometers there is the solar wind composition spectrum lunar surface magnetometer, a lunar dust collector, many more. It was all left up there all where it ran for years. Some of this technology is still running. We were there. Don't let them tell you otherwise.

Take care, everybody. Make sure you sign up for the security summer at Craig Peterson, dot com Take care, everybody. Bye-bye.

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Related articles:

Be Careful What You Browse — Drive-By Malware on the Rise

Are You Ready? Iranian Cyber Counter Attacks

Cyber Breaches — How far does your liability extend?

What We Know About Apollo Missions After 50 years 

Trumping Iranian Aggression 

 

Is Your App Safe? Maybe Not!

We Will Need 3.5 Million Cybersecurity Professionals by 2021 and They Won’t Come Out Of Our Colleges

Mac Non-Vulnerability Vulnerability

During Travel Is Your Data Safe from Snooping Eyes?

Who Is Your Biggest Cyber Liability? Maybe It Is Not Who You Think

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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Jun 26, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. This morning we talked about Deep Fake technology and what could happen in the future.  We discussed a new technological type of aversion therapy for breaking bad habits and we talked about Google search and article theft and what Congress is doing.

 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

 

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Related Articles:

The Problem With Deep Fakes

Shock Away Those Bad Habits

First Amendment Under Surprise Attack

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/26/2019

Deep Fakes, Aversion Therapy and Fair Use

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Craig Peterson

Hey, Good Morning, everybody. Craig Peterson, here. It is getting close to July. And coming up probably about the second week of July, I'm going to be doing a little bit of an online summer course we're calling it our security summer. It will be free for anyone who wants to attend. I'm trying to do this for the people who, who can't afford to hire me and I get it. There's a lot of people out there. But it's this. It is going to be mostly a business course. 

Yesterday, when I was speaking to a CEO mastermind group, there were a lot more in attendance than I had thought there would be and it went very, very well. Although it did not surprise me that they weren't entirely aware of all of the risks and what's going on. In retrospect, as I think about it, I probably should have put more positive stuff in the presentation. I tried to stress how they could lose their entire business due to their lack of awareness. Many of these are small to medium private companies, and that means it's their retirement, it's their money that's on the line. I tried to stress that they can no longer continue to coast. Anyways, this summer, we're going to teach you the things you need to know the things you need to do and how to do them. So keep an eye out for that. There's a sign up now, on my homepage at Craig Peterson dot com at the very top, you can sign up to get on my email list, you'll get my weekly show notes, and whenever anything really, bad is happening, you'll find out about it as well by email. You will also find out when I'm offering these free courses, or some of the paid ones as well, I'll let you know, believe me, I'm not hounding you. 

You know, some of these internet marketers are sending an email every day forever, you know, I might send you an email every day when there's something big going on. But other than that, it just doesn't happen. It's usually a weekly email and may average out to maybe two a week if something big is happening. But hopefully, you will find my emails informative. It's not the sort of thing you can get from your smart uncle. So we are going to go now to our friends over at WGAN and, and talk a little bit with them. And we're going to talk about Google and newspapers, the big fight that's coming up, aversion therapy, and the deep fake problem is hitting Hollywood and where does this lead us ultimately, so here we go.

Matt Gagnon

And we're back 738 WGAN and Morning News with Craig Peterson. He is our tech guru and joins us now as he always does on Wednesdays at this time to go over the world of technology. Craig Peterson. How are you this morning, sir?

Craig Peterson

A good morning.  I am doing well, Matt. I like this weather. I'm not an 80s 90s kind of guy. I love it in the 70s a beautiful, dry, day. That's my idea.

Matt Gagnon 

I get the 80s and 90s as well, Craig.  I love the 90s and hundreds I love it when it's 100 degrees.

Ken Altshuler

That's because you guys weren't born raised in Oklahoma, which is why

Matt Gagnon

Oh, it's a dry heat.

Ken Altshuler

It's not a dry heat.

Craig Peterson 

It's crazy and not a dry heat. No, no, no, no. They get a lot of humidity. And it gets frigid in the winter. It does.

Ken Altshuler

Yeah. And by the way, Craig it has it's been 80 degrees, like twice. Where do they get humidity? Well, some irrigation, but also the Gulf? Yes, it does. 

Craig Peterson

I remember I lived in pretty much northern Canada for a lot of my life. And we would get the warm, humid air would come up from the south, you know, those American clippers?

Matt Gagnon

Canada, the Arctic? 

Craig Peterson

Well, yeah, I won't go quite that far. I was about halfway up to the Arctic Circle. So I remember days when the high was 30 below zero, and I was walking to school. If you

Matt Gagnon  

Don't mind me asking, but why would anybody live there on purpose?

Craig Peterson

Well, it's not that bad, you get used to it. I guess it's not that I would rather have it be cold than hot. When it's cold, you can always put on another layer of clothes,

Matt Gagnon

Lots of clothing that you have to put on when the high was minus 30.

Craig Peterson 

Well, I had a parka. I'd wear the parka. It had a hood on your head. It goes in front of your face, and it goes out to a little tube that's maybe about six inches wide that you kind of look through and breathe out of so that you don't get frostbite on your face or your nose or anything.

Matt Gagnon

What a fantastic way to live, Craig.

Craig Peterson

In the summer, we'd get to 75 degrees, and it'd be just absolutely beautiful. You go to the Calgary Stampede,

Matt Gagnon

Which I did too, by the way.

Craig Peterson 

Yeah, I haven't been there since the 70 something I've been there since the 70s. But yeah, it's, you know, it's different. And I've been watching this Ice Plane show where they fly these old DC three and four planes from World War Two. They're flying around up there in the Canadian Arctic. It brought back memories, and I thought you know, it isn't so bad. It's a problem. Maybe what happens can is you kind of get gas-lit you don't know any better.

Matt Gagnon

By the way, why are deep fakes not a laughing matter? I'm curious.

Craig Peterson

Here's what's been going on you guys. I think even talked about that Nancy Pelosi video right? Where she was slurring her speech, and go, you know, drunk and everything a little different, though. That's not it. That's da that was a manipulated video where they slowed her down and cut it a little bit. But actually, it's a fake. Yeah, exactly. So a lot of people have heard about that one. Well, there's a few more that are out there. Right now. You've got one with our friend Mark Zuckerberg saying whoever controls the data controls the future. Right? That one's a real deep fake because they modeled a face on to him and and and like made it into, like, what a deep fake is. 

Matt Gagnon

It's like basically taking an actor and having you map their facial stuff to somebody else speaking and using porn quite a bit.

Craig Peterson

So I have no first-hand knowledge. Yeah, well, that's Photoshop, you know, most of the time, where and people are familiar with this, right? You'll take a picture, and you manipulate it. And some of these models out there say no, I don't want you to do fake me, you know, because it makes women feel inadequate. And yeah, I get that. And also the You see, all of a sudden, wait a minute, they have dimples on their legs, and maybe they're Pfizer a little sicker than you thought they were. So we've had those for a while. No,

Ken Altshuler

No, no, I hate to disagree with you on that one, Craig. But what he's referring to is the deep fake thing in pornography. Like they're putting like Taylor Swift on regular porn, a porn actress. And I've seen this and making it into the because these facial mapping technologies come so far now that and it's so cheap. 

Craig Peterson

Absolutely. Well, I'm glad you guys are well familiar with porn. I've only seen them in pictures for models. Now you can go online to YouTube. And you can see Game of Thrones actor who played, of course, Jon Snow, his name's Kevin Harrington, on there apologizing about all of these problems and mistakes in season eight of Game of Thrones. What they're doing is what Matt was saying. They take my mapping of your face and the mapping. Simple, right? It isn't like Lord of the Rings, where they had golf balls all over the guy that was playing that character Golem. Then they had to computers and spent over 100 million dollars spent in the development of the software over to make Gollum on screen. What we're talking about is what you can do right now today with some free software and do it on just a regular computer. And basically, you can make anyone say anything? I think that might be what's happening with some of those supposed tweets that are coming from our president?

Matt Gagnon  

Do you think they might?

Ken Altshuler

I would say not because he's known to say things like that.

Craig Peterson

Here's the problem now, right? If he's known to say things like that, and you can't trust this technology anymore, and we have deep fakes and let's say President Trump is saying things like the bombs are going to start dropping in 15 minutes, which is basically what President Ronald Reagan said years ago. How is someone like Iran going to know whether or not this is a deep fake? And there's been a lot of work going on on this because it has become such a problem on the government on the military side, and they're spending money now to try and figure out how they can tell us deep fake. We've got people in universities right now, doing just that. In one university, they created a couple of neural networks. In other words, artificial intelligence machines, they had one machine making deep fakes. And they had another machine analyzing them to see if something was a deep fake.  They were sharing back and forth. They got good at making deep fakes, where you want your video, and it, you can even change the head movement and everything else in the video, it isn't just like stick a head on top of an actress of Taylor Swift face on top of an actress. They can now manipulate what they're doing where the moving and make it look exactly like that person unless you look very closely, you can't tell. And when I say closely I mean, you can go in and examine it pixel by pixel. So we've got some potential problems here. We could have Russia, China, North Korea, Zimbabwe, go ahead and create a deep fake of our president or someone else threatening war. And this, this could get very dangerous very quickly.

Matt Gagnon 

We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru, who joins us now as he always does on Wednesdays to discuss the world of technology.  So, Craig, I have a nasty Mountain Dew habit, if I wanted to kick my Mountain Dew habit, should I be shocking myself as though I'm in some medieval shock therapy? Is this Pavlovian to the extreme? What is this idea that, that I've heard about where you would shock yourself into the kicking horrible habits?

Craig Peterson

Well, this is about the Pavlock bracelet. We've known about aversion therapy for a long time, and I've used it myself. Have you ever taken a rubber band, put it on your wrist when you're trying to break a habit? You snap it when tempted, or a particular thought comes around? Whether its food or your mountain dew? Do you guys have bad habits?

Ken Altshuler

I have no bad, I don't hate myself. 

Craig Peterson

It's a fairly common thing. And the idea is, you want to train your brain, that when you're thinking about having that smoke or when you're thinking about eating that food, whatever it might be, that chocolate cake, you snap yourself on the wrist using the rubber band, and it does work to a degree. 

Well, there's now a company out there that has an aversion therapy bracelet. It's called pavlok. Spelled pa-v-L-ok. It has a lightning bolt button on the front of it. When you hit the lightning bolt button, and it sends a shock right into your wrist. And the idea is that every time you think about that something, or you start making a particular bad habit, whatever it might be, you shock yourself to help you change your habit. Why? Your brain is going to associate it, the action or the thought instead of associated with pleasure is going to be associated with pain, and you will do it less. It is just a theory, but aversion therapy has worked for many years in the past. For those who don't have much self-discipline, you can have your friend, your spouse installs the Pavlok app up onto their smartphone and can use it as a remote control to shock you as you're wearing the bracelet. So you know self-control? I don't know. So if your spouse can, if she gives you a Pavlok, you might not want to because she can trigger the 350-volt shock. I think it's worth shot for some. I was going to say shock. But that would be just too bad. If I was morbidly obese and I wanted to quit eating this costs 200 bucks so isn't exactly cheap. But it's probably worth doing. And I  certainly would try it. But it's kind of neat, man. I think this is a decent idea.

Ken Altshuler

Craig Peterson, he's our tech guru joins us every Wednesday at 738. So is Google stealing the News from the New York Times?

Craig Peterson

Oh, man, this thing keeps hitting the News. Because this week, what's happening is they were talking more about this. And here's what's going on the News Media Alliance is going after Google accusing them of stealing the News. If you do Google search, it'll come up, and it will give you results. And some of those results will be swiped directly from websites as well as news sites. And if you go to News, Google com, it's even worse because it's all swiped from news sites. The big question, of course, comes under fair use.  Is it fair use for Google to grab a few sentences from it, and put it up on their website. The New York Times and other news sources, which include local newspapers have said that this is wrong. And it costs them billions of dollars. Because if you add it all up, more than half of the local newspapers have gone out of business, just this look right here in Portland, look anywhere release so much of the US now do not there aren't local papers anymore. So Congress is currently involved. And there is a real bipartisan bill that has been starting to move. There's one in the house, one in the Senate, where they are trying to carve out an exemption to the antitrust laws for newspapers for four years. And the idea is that they can now collude to try and figure out what kind of a business model works. The reason for this is they don't want the local newspapers to be going out of business.  It is the whole right to free speech, which is getting squashed on every side, you look is being hurt by this lack of local newspapers. Maybe they can come up with something that would work. I know, personally, if I could pay 10 or 20 bucks a month, just like I do for streaming music, I would buy one subscription and get all of the newspapers that I want to get right. But I'm not going to pay 10 bucks to New York Times, Washington Post, and you know, all of these guys, as it would end up costing 50 to a hundred bucks a month. On top of that, I have to track all my subscriptions and everything. It's just too complicated. So we'll see what happens here. We've even got a very conservative Senator Kennedy from Louisiana, who was sponsoring this in the Senate. So we'll see where this goes. But I know I don't say this very often. But I can sympathize with a great lady in this case. Hmm,

Matt Gagnon 

That is a first. All right. Well, Craig Peterson happens to be our tech guru. And he joins us at this time every Wednesday to go over all the things in the world of technology. Craig, today is no exception. Thanks so much for joining the program. And we will talk to you again.

Craig Peterson

Next week. Gentlemen, thanks.

Ken Altshuler

Thanks a lot, Craig. All right, coming up at eight. Oh,

Craig Peterson

Hey, everybody. Thanks for listening. If you have not already, make sure you subscribe. It helps us out. It gets us on more lists. And that gets the message out to more people. I want to reach more people. I want to help stop some of the nastiness that's going on. That's why I do so much volunteer work. Anyhow, uh, thanks for being with us. I appreciate you guys listening. Take care. Talk to you tomorrow. Well, I guess I won't talk to you till Saturday. Bye-bye.

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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Jun 25, 2019

Craig was on with Jim Polito. Today, they discussed the latest tech to help you change behavior and why we must be concerned about Deep Fakes and what they could result in.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

Shock Away Those Bad Habits

The Concern About Deep Fakes and Why? 

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/25/2019

Behavior shock therapy and Deep fakes

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning, everybody and a shout out to the UNH CEO group I'm going to be speaking to today. I am Craig Peterson. I am excited about today's presentation because I work with a lot of businesses and unfortunately for CEO's I usually get passed off to the technical people who report to them which means they only get my information and insight second hand and filtered.

However, today, I am speaking to a large group of CEO's of some pretty fair sized businesses as a presenter to their mastermind group, and I am honored to be able to speak with them.

This morning. I was on with our friend Jim Polito. He has a big radio show down in Massachusetts that covers most of the state, and parts of Vermont, Rhode Island and I think he can be heard in Connecticut too at least in the eastern parts of it. Anyhow, we got busy today talking a little bit about some of the articles in the news.

Jim Polito
It is one of the most popular segments on the show. I'm talking about our tech talk guru, Craig Peterson. He joins me now. Good morning, sir. Hey, good morning. All right, listen, are you trying to turn me into Pavlov's dog? Are you telling me that I can shock myself of my bad habits? Craig, don't lie. I got them. I got the documents from you. Do you say I can be shocked out of bad habits?

Craig Peterson
Well, have you ever had a habit like smoking, for instance? Or maybe you ate a little too much?

Jim Polito
Oh, I never overeat? I was a smoker and quit cold turkey? A long, long, long, long, long time ago. But I yeah, I mean, I have some bad habits. I mean, getting up every morning and doing this show, some people would say is a bad habit.

Craig Peterson
Well, one of the things that I've used for a while and I've tried this before, and it kind of worked for me actually, for getting rid of a bad habit is to put a rubber band around your wrist. Yes. And you know, so you think about smoking, or you think about eating that chocolate bar or you thinking about something. And all you do is you take the rubber band, you pull it back, and you let go, and it snaps against your wrist. And it's a kind of negative reinforcement. Have you tried that one before?

Jim Polito
No, but I've seen people do it. I know other people who quit smoking, and they put one of those thick rubber bands around their waist. And every time they think about smoking, they snap that rubber band. Yeah. Negative reinforcement.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, it's called aversive therapy which is the more scientific name for it. The idea is with that your brain no longer likes the habit does every time you go to do something, you know, you get that negative reinforcement. So there's a company out there called Pavlock now. They have an exciting twist on this one. What Pavlock has is a basic type watch unit, it's kind of it's a little bigger than a watch. But it's designed for the same type of thing you can buy this for 199.99 or 200 bucks. What happens is, when you're thinking about something, you want to break the habit, you push the lightning bolt on it. Now to me, that's a bad sign. This thing's going to send us 350 volts into your arm. And if anything's going to do it, it would be a burst of therapy that had 350 volts onto your wrist.

Jim Polito
I think my God, I mean,

Craig Peterson
It gets better, Jim.

Jim Polito
Go ahead, continue, please.

Craig Peterson
Okay, here's how it gets better. You can have your friend or your spouse install an app on their smartphone for this thing. You don't have to press that lightning button, and they can open the app.

Craig Peterson
Here's what happens. Bottom line is everything vibrates and beats, and it zapped until the user gets up and does something that's their morning shot clock.

Jim Polito
You mean I am sleeping in bed, and you're telling me, I could set it for 3:15 am, which is when I get up, and I'll be laying in bed, dreaming that I'm sitting on some beach, not in the Dominican Republic, but sitting on some beach having a drink and my lovely wife is with me. And then all of a sudden it vibrates and shocks me.

Craig Peterson
But it gets worse. If your wife gives you one of these as a present, be very careful, she might have installed that app an at any point in talking to me.

Jim Polito
Yeah, yeah.

Craig Peterson
I guess the idea is if you start, you know, if you're not brave enough to take it 350 volts jolt, when, when you're picking up that pack of cigarettes, but she is she's just going to hit that button and off it goes. It's available online. Right now, Pavlock P-a-v-L-o-c-k you can buy it now.

Jim Polito
You know, what people don't realize is the simplest of Pavlov's experiments with the dog was ringing the bell and then feeding it and so and then it got to the point where he would ring the bell, and the dog would salivate because it knew it was going to eat? Well, the other thing he did was electrocute the dog, too. And I won't tell you where he attached the electrodes, but let's say, Pavlov was someone studying behavior and psychology, could have used a little help maybe himself. All right, let's go on to something else. Deep fakes. I found this fascinating. We're not talking about the deep state. We're talking about deep fakes. Please explain that, sir.

Craig Peterson
Well, this is an exciting new offshoot of technology. And you're going to be seeing these more and more. And it's frankly, going to get dangerous. This technology. I think Jim could start a war. Here's what it is that the idea behind deep fakes is and something that's not new. You've seen photoshopped pictures, and there were a lot of models that said, I want a reasonable photo of me I want people to see what I look like without removing those lumps on my legs and you know, the blemishes and the scars and everything right? They go in and coach Photoshop, which became a picture to make them look perfect, practically perfect in every way. Well, what's happening now is with deep fake, they're able to do some amazing things. Think back to Lord of the Rings. You remember in Lord of the Rings, and there was that character Golem who was crawling around right? And that was a real actor back in the day. Now he didn't look like darling wasn't in a Golem suit. But he had these golf ball like things all over his body. What they did is use a computer to shoot the video, the computer equipment then located these little golf balls that were all over him to figure out how the actor was moving. That's how they made Gollum look like he was moving like it might be a natural character or something. Right. But you know, that was probably 10s of millions of dollars to do Golem back in the day. Today, you can do something very similar for no money. The way it works is you get you all you have to do is have a sample of someone on video. There's one out there right now of an actor Kit Harrington who was the actor who played Jon Snow in Game of Thrones. Well, several people are criticizing season eight of Game of Thrones, myself included. Yeah, I thought that they did a poor job. You can find this right now. If you go to YouTube. You can search for this, and you will see Kit Harrington in costume as Jon Snow in character apologizing for some of the mistakes that people are complaining about in season eight.

Jim Polito
Like the Korean coffee cup. Yes, stuff.

Craig Peterson
Exactly. Yeah, yeah, exactly. And you know, the weak scriptwriting some of the other stuff he's complaining about in there. That is called a deep fake. And what it is, is they just took a video of him, and they put somebody they manipulated his face. So they shot a video someone saying those things, and the computer, just a regular desktop computer, superimposed this guy's face and his facial expressions onto Kit Harington. Something very similar was got about, what three weeks ago to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, you remember that one? Oh, yeah. Yeah. And yeah, and so she was anchored or altered, I should say to make a sound like she was slurring her words like she might have been drinking. And that's where I think the whole war thing might come in. Because whoever controls the data controls the future. And that's a quote from CEO Mark Zuckerberg. He was also the victim of a deep fake, himself.

Jim Polito
Yeah, no, I've heard about this. And, you know, there's a lot we can talk about what we, you know, they could embarrass you or hurt your product. But you went right to what I think is the most important thing about this, you could have a deep fake of a world leader saying something that they never said, that could lead to war, just because that could be a form of terrorism. Say you have Vladimir Putin saying, we're going to attack the United States tonight or something like that? You really could.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, and it's difficult to tell. What's happening right now is the military, as well as law enforcement, are now both involved with some of the deep fake stuff. And they've come up with some technology to detect the deep fakes, and we might be able to recognize one, okay. But this was is a pertinent point, saying the smaller country like Iran might have no idea how to do that. For instance, look at Iran right now, with this whole thing with the drones. We have the GPS data, and we have the computer-generated maps, we can show you exactly where our drone was. Well, Iran produced a map too. It was hand-drawn by somebody with a crayon saying, here is where the US drone was, yeah. Okay. So, so how do you compare those, where's this going? It is difficult is going to be a game of one-ups-manship. I think within ten years, we're going to have a real problem. One of the things that have been done to try and stop the fake and to help with the detection. At one university, they created two artificial intelligence machines that had neural nets and could self learn. They had one that created the fake, and then they had the other to detect the fake. And they communicated back and forth. The one creating deep fake got very good at it. But the one that was catching these also got
very good at it.

Jim Polito
Oh, my God AI, in five or 10 years from now. Wow.

Jim Polito
Well, look, folks, there's nothing artificial about Craig Peterson's intelligence, you just got a little bit of it. And you should get on Craig Peterson's list. It's not the naughty list. It's a nice list. He'll send you the information that we discussed today. Plus a whole lot of other stuff. And when there's a big hack or something goes wrong, you've got Craig Peterson on your side, he won't sell your name. He won't do anything else with it. But you should text My name, Jim, to this number

Craig Peterson
855-385-5553. That's text Jim to 855-385-5553

Jim Polito
Standard data and text rates apply, and it's a great thing to do. Craig, fascinating segment today.

I look forward to talking with you next week.

Craig Peterson
Thanks. Take care, Jim.

Jim Polito
You too, Bye-bye. All right, folks. Don't go anywhere. When we return.

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Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

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Jun 25, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath this Monday morning. They talked about what Samsung tweeted this week and about what Google is being accused of by papers and what Congress is attempting to do to change it.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

Smart TVs Need Help Too

First Amendment Under Surprise Attack

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/24/2019

Good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here.

It is going to be a beautiful summer week here in the Northeast.

We enjoyed a great weekend with temperatures in the upper 70's, with almost no humidity and nighttime sleeping weather in the 50's.

It is the perfect weather for being outside. We took down a tree in our backyard that had died got it mostly cut up and getting the wood ready. Our bees are flying. The chickens are laying. I hear it is going to be getting hotter later this week and we might hit 90 degrees, which is high for us. Okay, for you guys in the south. Quit your complaining, right, Craig? Anyhow, I am looking forward to another terrific week this week.

This morning, I was on with Mr. Jack Heath. We had a chance to chat a little bit about Samsung's tweet this week.

I am going to be speaking at UNH at a mastermind group. It should be kind of fun talking with a bunch of CEOs. We'll be talking about what's happening in their business. What does the CEO have to do? What is it that's part of their responsibility that frankly, they may not understand very well, cybersecurity and why they cannot just brush it off.

It's another thing you have to do. It's another hat you might have to wear. And so most people just aren't putting that hat on very often and look at what's happened at all of these major corporations. I see the concern in smaller companies where the owner, the CEO, is trying to do something about it. The problem is that many of them are just considering it a budget item. It's a bridge to cross when we come to it. However, now we're talking 60% of small-medium businesses are going to get nailed this year. We'll be talking a little bit about that as well. Also, what happened here with Time Magazine, there is a law working its way through Congress. I've disagreed with my Mom and Dad for years about their "ought to be a law" which they'd say about just about everything. I tend to take the opposite track, but this time, I agree. Here we go with Mr. Heath.

Jack Heath
Alright, a quick check in on the Tech Talk side of things. Craig Peterson, our tech talk guy. Craig, good morning on a Monday, hope you're getting an excellent start to your week. Just one question, you know, you have an interesting piece coming out of your weekend show tech talk about sort of moral authority and who has the higher ground Google, or news outlets on searches? Tell us about this?

Craig Peterson
Yeah, this is quite an interesting problem. We now have an article that came out in the New York Times complaining that basically, Google has stolen about $5 billion overall, but you know, hundreds of millions worth of coverage from these news organizations. For instance, if you go to Google, and you do a search on Google, it'll come up with all the kinds of results. Many of those results are specifically from news organizations. So they have gotten together, there are over 2000 of these news publishers, most of them small-town papers, but they include some multi, some huge, you know, multi-state, national newspapers. They've gotten together, and now they have a bill this moving through Congress that's backed by both Republicans and Democrats, even Senator Kennedy, who was typically very, very conservative. No, not that Senator Kennedy, the one from Louisiana. They have gotten together, and they are going to pass a bill it looks like that gives newspapers an exemption to the antitrust laws that are out there. In other words, they can get together, and they can collude to come up with a way to stay in business. How do you stop a powerhouse like Google? And how do you keep the local newspapers, more than half of which have closed their doors, in recent years?

Jack Heath
Interesting, interesting study.

Craig Peterson
It's a huge problem. Hey, I'm going to be speaking to a UNH group of CEO's this week about some of the issues we see here in New Hampshire, with technology with security in this is a very, very big deal. There is an article out of Samsung as well. Last week, Samsung had a tweet that they had sent out, probably accidentally, warning people to make sure they run anti-virus checks on their Samsung Smart T.V.s. And you know what, Jack, it is just a reminder, everything we have nowadays, all of our new cars to our T.V.s, have computers in them. At least Samsung has anti-virus software for your T.V. Follow their advice, although they deleted the tweet and make sure you're watching it for viruses. It is just spreading further and further. And there's no end in sight.

Jack Heath
Great stuff on this Monday morning, Craig. Tech Talk with Craig Peterson with an O.N. com. Thanks, Craig.

Craig Peterson
Take care. Thanks, Jack.

Craig Peterson
I want to point out to those that might be interested, and I think I may take the presentation I put together for the C-Level's on the things they need to know and do to direct all of the people within the organization because nowadays security covers everybody. You might have your sales and marketing guys using some software as a service. You obviously have your I.T. people who are doing it, but you've got cloud providers out there that may or may not be doing the right things. I'm thinking maybe I should turn some of this into a course or mini-course. Let me know if you'd like to see that. Just me at Craig Peterson calm email me at Craig Peterson calm. Let me know if that's something that would interest you. And we'll try and put it into our security summer this year. I can't believe it's almost July. Oh man, I have to get busy too much to do. All right, everybody. Hey, thanks for being with us. Thanks for listening and being a regular subscribe if you haven't already. It helps our numbers and gets the message out to more people subscribe on your favorite platform. Or you can go to Craig Peterson comm slash iTunes. Leave me a comment. Hopefully, I've earned a five-star review from you. Take care. Everybody will be back on the morrow. Bye-bye.

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Jun 22, 2019

 

Republicans and Democrats are getting together to save the news industry, listen in to find out more

Walmart is going head to head with Amazon on food delivery.

Who will win the security login battle Single sign-on versus 2F-A

I am planning a Security Summer for my listeners.  I will have some free courses.  I will also introduce you to some of the software that I use for my clients and how you can use it too.  Also, I have some limited opportunities for businesses who have had enough with their security issues to work with me and my team and put their security problems to rest once and for all.   So watch out for announcements on those.

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript: 

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/22/2019

Republicans and Democrats are getting together to save the news industry, Walmart is competing with Amazon on food delivery, and Single sign-on versus 2F-A.

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Hello, everybody, Craig Petersson, here. We have another jam-packed show for today. We are going to discuss some of the technology that's affecting our lives, including, of course, some security stuff just some amazing things. Did any of you catch the tweeted story from Samsung this week? Well if you did, you got it before they deleted the tweet. We're going to talk about today. Hey, if you have a Samsung SmartTV, you're going to want to hear this.

We've got Google trying to go after Apple but in the end praising them for what they are doing in the same competitive arena. That's going to open up a whole topic of discussion on two-factor authentication and single sign on's. I'm going to go through it and explain it to you today. We will talk about the difference between software and hardware tokens, Google Authenticator, some of the other competitors out there so that you can understand what's going on and what it's all about. It is an important topic everybody needs to understand.

I also came across another article this week that had an interesting take on our First Amendment and the state of affairs in Washington DC and the Republicans and Democrats. It appears they are having a harder and harder time getting along much these days. However, it looks like there is a bill moving through Congress that is going to affect you the way you use Google, your Facebook account, and even the news in your local town. We'll delve into what that is all about.

I have to tell you about this little bracelet, called the Pavlock. Deep fakes are in the news again.

Here's another big thing, too. I should do some little small webinars on these. But man, it might be time to switch to a privacy browser. We'll to spend a bit of time talking about those today.

I'm going through the clock in my head thinking man, and we are not going to have time to do all of this.

Oh, and Walmart, we have to talk about this. Absolutely. Let's talk about it right. By now you know that we have some, just Goliath, some behemoth companies that are out there. That includes retail giants like Walmart and Target who've been fighting with each other over market share, of course, for a long time. If you know anything about marketing and color choice, you know, you always choose the opposite color. Did you know that they make whole color wheels specifically for figuring out the exact contrasting color of your competition? If your competitors' logo color is blue, then you use red. The other two colors that used are yellow and green. It's interesting to look at that, and I found that analysis quite interesting. Anyway, we have these two big competitors, Target is Red, and Walmart is Blue. Doesn't that go against the whole red-state blue-state thing based on shoppers? Both, of course, have added online stores. If you think about another large company, who could have owned the online business world had they made different decisions it would have been Sears Roebuck. Think about it. Sears had a vast catalog and distribution business that had been successful for 100 years plus before Amazon was even an idea. Amazon kind of nailed retailers, including Sears.

Now Amazon Prime with their purchase of Whole Foods and their online service from Amazon is starting to eat the lunch of both Target and Walmart. So both of them are fighting back. Walmart's now taking aim at Targets product called shipped, spelled shIPT. They are providing for it looks like it's going to be $98 per year for unlimited delivery service. Right now they have a service that is ten bucks or $9.98 or something to have all your stuff delivered to you if you go to one of their stores that offers grocery pickup. Right now, it is available in about 2500 Walmart stores, and you can go and pick up your order for free. However, what a convenience this is going to be. Right now it's only being offered in a few markets, Houston, Miami, Salt Lake City and in Tampa. The pricing may change, well, probably will change. Target just lowered the pricing of their InstaCart shIPT, as well. We'll see how this all goes but unlimited delivery of your groceries. Wow!.

You might have seen on the news that they are proposing that their delivery people will wear a camera can go right into the home and stock your fridge. However, for those of you that are crazy busy and don't even have time to swing by Walmart or Target to pick up groceries, Walmart anyways is going to put them right into your refrigerator. You can watch them on your computer or smartphone as they're in your home. I find that a little bit nerve-wracking. But you know, I'm nervous.

Let's think back a little bit. We were house shopping some years ago. And we were looking at homes in downtown Nashua, which is down in Southern New Hampshire in about the center of the state. We looked at some beautiful old houses, and you know, they don't make them like that anymore. I course you know I went into the basements and up into the attics, I want to see what are the beams like and how's it been held together. We looked at one home that had the logs, yes full old trees that were holding the floors up and some of the floors were warped because of that they were just so old. These homes were a few hundred years old. But these homes in Nashua were very well built. Some of the beams in them were 6x8, and some were even bigger than that. It was of course, very dry wood because it was over 100 years old, just beautiful. But one of the things they had in them was a butler's pantry with an outside entrance where the ice delivery guy put the ice. They didn't have to enter your home. He could open a little door that opened right into the back of your refrigerator. Do you remember those? I know, of course, you never really used them, unless you're one of my very much older audience. But the refrigerator would have a block of ice at the top. And of course, the cold air would come down from the ice and keep the stuff in your icebox cooler. They had direct access into the icebox from outside. Why don't we do that? I am sure someone can come up with a refrigerator, or you know a locked butler's pantry, or something so that Walmart or another third party can enter that part of the home or at least gain access to the fridge without having full access to the house. I think that's just a great idea. We've seen them already, Amazon and others doing deliveries into a garage. I know many homes have an entrance at the front, particularly when you get further north, up in Canada. There they are a popular solution to keep the cold air from filling your home as you you're come in from the cold outside. It is a place that you can take off your big heavy boots and everything else. It's only partially heated. And then you can go into the house and then take off your coat and everything else, you know, something like that, wouldn't that be great? A place, like that, you could give access to these delivery people. With Walmart, you're must buy their $200 door lock that you put on your front door that allows them to gain access to the house. How about if they only had access to a pantry? What a great new design concept? Flashback 150 years, I think that's kind of cool. For $98 a year, I might seriously consider signing up for this and see how it goes. You know, Whole Paycheck. I mean, Whole Foods might not be the best ones to have your weekly grocery delivery from unless you have a small family and a lot of income, then why not? All right, that I think that might make some sense.

Before we get into our big topics, let's go through a couple more real kind of quick ones. What is happening in Congress? Here is an article I found out in the Salt Lake Tribune, an opinion piece. It was talking about the News Media Alliance. Now, this is an alliance that represents some 2000 news publishers, mostly local newspapers, but also has some national papers, including the Washington Post, and also includes some digital-only news site. What the news media alliances been saying is, "Hey, listen, look at the newspaper industry." Have you guys seen the stats on this? It is crazy how many newspapers have gone out of business in the last ten years.


According to Pew Research, newsrooms have lost nearly half of their staffs in the last ten years, and since 2004, so the last 15 ish years, the US has lost about 1800 newspapers, and that's mainly weekly papers, these weeklies tended to be our local papers. In the town I live in, we used to have a few local newspapers, there were at least two. There's one that was focused in on coupons and another one that was focused in on local news. Nowadays, people are going to the Patch, which is a local/national effort. I think it was Yahoo that started the Patch and you might want to check it out.


But this organization of these smaller newspapers and a few larger ones, are saying, things are tough right now. Look at what Apple just did. Apple put in place a brand new system that allowed papers to consolidate. So for ten bucks a month, you had access to newspapers, that are part of Apple news, I signed up for it, on a trial basis, to see what I thought and I was disappointed myself. There was hardly any news included. It was some magazines primarily. And most of the time, I don't care about magazines. I once in a while will look at Architectural Digest, looking at these homes and beautiful designs. But other than that, I had no interest. I'm not a sports guy at all, so I don't care about sports magazines. I don't care about the glamour stuff. I'm kind of as you know, a techie guy, so I didn't like it. I initially thought it would be great because heck, I do subscribe to a couple of newspapers and I do that for one reason I need to stay informed, right? Every week I prepare to talk to you guys, and I'm trying to find some of the best tech articles out there just like this one I found in The Salt Lake Tribune talking about a long tail, a weird little newspaper, at least if you don't live in Utah, or Salt Lake. I do a little bit of that. I thought, Man, this might be a boon for the newspapers because they might get 50 cents or a buck out of Apple, at least, if I spend a lot of time reading the newspaper. I don't know how it is all set up or how the Apple payment works. However, what these guys are trying to do with the News Media Alliance, are petitioning Congress to provide them with an exemption. Now, you know, I am not fond of the antitrust laws. I think, you know, by now that I'm somewhat Libertarian. I sit in the middle of most of these arguments. However, I don't think we should bail out big businesses that go bad. When they fail, when GM fails, or Chrysler fails, we should let the free market take care of it. We should let them fail. It sucks at all these people are going to lose jobs and pensions and everything else. But it should be a cautionary thing to them. They should be looking at that and saying hey, listen it is probably not a wise decision to acquire this other company because we are not going to get the bailout at the end of all of us if things go sour. That's where I'm coming from, and you may agree or disagree with me. What is happening right now is we've got Senator Kennedy out of Louisiana. He is a staunch Republican, and he's very conservative like-minded, in a lot of ways with me. And he is getting together with someone that I don't agree with very often. And that is Senator Klobuchar of Minnesota. She's running for the Democratic presidential nomination right now. Senators Kennedy and Senator Klobuchar have gotten together, and they put together a bill in the Senate. And there's also a house version, co-sponsored by Georgia, Republican Collins and Rhode Island Democrat Cicilline. What they're doing is they're saying, Hey, listen, let's give newspapers a four-year antitrust exemption.

They've got safe harbor, that way they can get together and figure out how news content and advertising can be equitably divided. My thinking is, maybe these newspapers can put together a little Alliance of their own, you know, for maybe 20 bucks a month or something or perhaps only 10. All of these newspapers, and remember it is 2000 news publishers, you can gain access to their publications. Even if I wanted to subscribe to all of these papers, it's too much of a hassle for me to subscribe to them all. Additionally, for me, I worry about them all having my credit card because they many won't use PayPal, many of them won't use Apple Pay because they don't want to pay the Apple tax. So you can't subscribe through the Apple Store. That means that I now have to keep tabs of 20 newspapers, subscriptions, and each one has my credit card information. That means I have to watch to make sure they're do not get hacked. If they get hacked, I need to try and get my data back and remember to go and give them the new credit card numbers after I cancel the credit card the one they had got breached. I'm glad to see Republicans and Democrats getting together. Obviously, some Democrats are against it, and some Republicans are against it, and others are for it, and everything else. It is not a universal thing. I think that we have to protect our newspapers are our media is our first line of defense against some of the government corruption that inevitably happens.
Unfortunately, most of these news media outlets nowadays tend to be very partisan, right? They won't say anything negative about their guy or their gal, right. However, they will rip on every small little detail about the other guy. It bothers me. It is of benefit to the publisher because they have some income and don't have to cater to their demographic quite as much as they might have had to before. Plus, it exposes people to more points of view. I think it's an absolute win. No question about that. No question at all. If you go to my website at Craig Peterson dot come, you'll see that my wife and I worked on quite a big article on two-factor authentication, single sign-on, again, that's at Craig Peterson dot com.

We had a little bit above this last week, where we talked about Apple and Apple's new sign in option you've probably used, or at least you've seen this option on many, many of the websites that sign in as Google are using your Google login or your Facebook login. It ties into our last article about Google and Facebook sucking profits away from these newspapers and putting it together. How does it tie in? Well, it ties in because of my concern about the number of logins, hundreds, right? If I sign up to hundreds of newspapers, I would rather have one sign in option. I'd rather have one payment for everybody. I like a consume as I much as want a type of methodology. It's just like these streaming audio services. Did you sign up for Apple Music? I've done it. Do sign up for amazon music? Do you sign up for Spotify, which I've never done it all, but a lot of people have. Spotify is very popular with older people. Or do you sign up for Pandora, which I've also done? I like Pandora think they have some of the best algorithms out there. Which service is the best for you to sign up? How do you sign up? Well, having this single sign-on can be useful. However, the big question is, do you trust Google and Apple. We've talked about some of the problems with the two-factor authentication, especially when it comes to using your cell phone. That's where they send you a verification text to type. They text a code that you type into the website, and a lot of sites will do that. Okay, well what happens if you are a specific target? If they've narrowed you down, if you are the CEO of a decent company, you could be a particular target and not just a part of the wide net that some phishing scammer out there might be using. It's dangerous because if the bad guy has your phone number, the text comes to him. Well, we're not going to get into that right now. But what I want to do is talk about the single sign-on a little bit more two-factor authentication, Apple's new single sign-on where you will be able to log in using your Apple ID, I think right now is probably the preferred way to do it. Or at least it will be the favorite way to do it. It's not out quite out yet.
Apple, remember, they make their money not by selling your information, not by selling your data which is how both Facebook and Google make their money by and by the way, I don't think that's a bad thing. Okay, don't get me wrong you need to understand all the trade-offs. Apple tries to have privacy in mind. I love that. And that's part of the reason I've been supporting Apple more recently, although I've disagreed with things that Apple's done. I've disagreed with things everybody's done, right. That's what you get for being a little bit in the middle of the road here. But let's explain what's going on. Those are all called single sign-on's. And that's where you can use your one ID, which would be your Apple ID, your Google ID or your Facebook ID to sign into these websites. And that can be a good thing for a lot of people. Because now you only have to remember the one complicated password as opposed to a whole bunch of them. You know, I prefer to use a bunch of different passwords, different email addresses everything as that's more secure. But the Apple's Single Sign On is going to be a win for a lot of people. Now, let's talk to you guys and gals who are in more of a security, conscious space. If you're just a home user, maybe you're a little bit older, and things get confusing, it's hard to track stuff, you're going to want to use that Apple single sign on when it's available.
However, If you are a business professional and you own a business, you are in accounting or finance or human resources, or maybe security, you're going to need to do things differently. You're going to want to use a suitable type of two-factor authentication. There are two types, software, and hardware. You know already that I prefer One password for my password management and to generate all my passwords. Well, it has an authenticator built into it, which I use whenever possible. Google has a free one available, as well called Google Authenticator. Here's how that works. When you go to a website, and you sign up for the two-factor authentication using one of these authenticators, what's going to happen is that you are going to be presented with it a little QR code that you can scan with your device. That means that when you go into your device, Google Authenticator, for instance, you scan the little QR code that the website is giving you for the authenticator, you do it with one password. Now your smartphone using the authenticator can generate a code that's going to be unique, and it changes every 30 seconds. Now what happens is, when you go to go back to that website to login, you're going to give your username, give you your password, which is something you know, along with something you have. Then it's going to ask you for the authenticator code. You can copy it directly, you can type it in, or you look it up on your Google Authenticator app or in one password, and bam, Oh, there you go. You are now logged in. That is the most reasonably secure way to login, use one of these authenticator apps, use it on a site that allows you to use an authenticator. The next level above that, which is what we use in my business, because we do security work, right? We help businesses manage their security. We do security, not just gap analysis, but effectiveness gap analysis for companies, and we help them keep track of it. What should you be doing? You know, we have the newsletters and things for business owners for sea level people aimed directly at them, right so that we're not just boring them with stuff. It is the stuff that your smart uncle doesn't know. But you need to know as a C-level person in a business, Right? We're at that level, and we use some unique hardware tokens. You've seen probably some of these before RSA has their secure ID, and DUO, company we've been using for a couple of years now has theirs. And these are little things that might go on your key chain, and they're showing this number, the changes every 30 seconds. Sound familiar? That's like the authenticator. I think that's all great. And then there are hardware tokens. These tokens go into your computer. They are things like the Yubikey, the Titan, which has had an issue recently. We use these hardware tokens. We have to put those into our machine to be able to use it. We have to enter the right passwords and things. Then and only then can we log in. So there you go, there's a quick rundown of what you might want to use to increase your security. If you're a home user, when it's available, start using the Apple single sign-on or start using the Facebook or Google login, Google is probably the safer way to go because you are less likely to have your information stolen. The Facebook one is the one I trust the least. If you are a subtle need of slightly higher security, maybe you've got some retirement money, some investment money, you're going to want to use one of these authenticators like Google Authenticator. If you are like me, you're going to use something like one password, which is a little bit better, right? Because one password has it all in a single place and has your passwords and generators everything. Ultimately you have the specific hardware tokens that plug into your USB port, or they also connect via Bluetooth to your devices.

If you want me to put together a little course on this, let me know, and I'll be glad to do that. A class that can show you how this all works and gives you some links and, and also some little video of how to do it, how to use it. I'll be glad to do that.

I've got to mention this one here, by the way, we've got our security summer coming up here in starting in July. And this is going to be some in-depth training about the significant back to essential points that you've been missing. Right, this is going to be a brass tacks course. We will be getting down to the brass tacks. So make sure you keep an eye out for an email from me about it. By the way, we got a new signup form at the top of the website pages Yay, finally got it all working at Craig Peterson.com, you will see it up there. But there's a lot to cover. And these are going to be 10 to 15 minute short segments that you can watch, and it's going to be kind of a summit format. I want everybody to get this. There's no charge, absolutely free to attend and free to watch all of these. You can ask questions during them because I want to get everybody up to the right level. I really want everybody to understand the brass tacks. So keep an eye out for that.

We are getting down to the last articles for today. Alright. Go right now to Craig Peterson dot com, you'll see right at the top of it should be on every page. Now, a little thing that will come up that gives you the option to provide me with your name and email. And I'll sign into my weekly newsletter, which has the security tips and will also tell you about the security summit this summer.

There was a Tweet from Samsung, then they deleted their tweet, but they had little tweet this past week that The Verge is quoting will prevent malicious software attacks on your TV by scanning for viruses on your TV every few weeks. Well, there you go. Samsung, at least for a few minutes, acknowledged that their TVs, like every other smart TV out there, is vulnerable to hacks. So here's my advice to everybody. If you have a smart TV, I turn off all of the Smart TV functions, everything, turn off the microphone, turn off the ability to run Roku or Plex or whatever you're trying to run on it, turn it off. Then I use a standalone device. Now I do use an external Roku for one of my TVs.
The problem is that over time support for the software that's in your TV will not be available anymore. My absolute preferred platform if you can, and this is from a security standpoint, is the Apple TV. I have the Apple TV for my main TV. I say get the Apple TV, but I don't make any money for this recommendation. Apple isn't a sponsor, and they don't pay me anything and never have, Right. I was on their advisory board for three years, and they never paid me a dime, right. I am telling you this because I think it's essential that you have an external device and one that can get regular hardware and software updates. It won't have a microphone built-in. It won't come with all the security problems.

You might remember, WikiLeaks revealed the CIA had developed a piece of software called Weeping Angel. And that turned Samsung Smart TVs into listening devices okay.
Then less than a month later, later, security researchers found 40 unpatched vulnerabilities on Samsung Smart TV operating system. Be careful and remember these are TV manufacturers, not security experts, people. Stick with those who make smart devices for the TV stick with an external Roku or maybe an Amazon fire or my recommendation, get an Apple TV, turn everything off inside your TV and use that external device.

We're out of time. That's it for today. Visit me online Craig Peterson dot com. Make sure you sign up for the updates so you can keep up with what's going on and you can be part of my security summer summit.

Take care, everybody. Bye-bye.

 

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Related articles:

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Shock Away Those Bad Habits

When Your Vendors Become A Cyber Liability

Smart TVs Need Help Too

First Amendment Under Surprise Attack

Newest Browsers Are All About Your Privacy

The Up and Coming Alternative To Grocery Shopping

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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Jun 19, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. This morning,  we touched on a whole bunch of topics in the news. We discussed Apple's newly announced single sign-on and what they are doing that makes it different.  We delved into DNA testing and some of the legal implications that are currently in the news. We talked about the NSA and the unprecedented step they took to warn everyone about the latest Microsoft vulnerability and why we must take it seriously.  I gave  Ken, a tongue-in-cheek explanation as to how he could fix the problems he is experiencing with his MacBook Pro keyboard.  

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

CEOs and Business Owners Aren't Taking CyberSecurity Seriously - And Are Facing Huge Penalties

Week After Week Vulnerability After Vulnerability  

Multiple Logins The Bane of Modern Online Life

Technology and Database have Murderers and Rapists Crying Foul

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/19/2019

Apple keyboard Issues, Legal implications of DNA databases, Apple's new Single Sign-on, NSA Warnings on latest Microsoft vulnerabilities,

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Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson, here. This morning, I got to talk with Ken and Matt a little bit. We discussed Ken's problem with his Apple keyboard, and I gave him a couple of solutions. His MacBook Pro. We reminisced a bit of a few things today, in fact, even with Matt. We did finally get to talk about some of the security problems that are out there., right now, There are some things you might want to be sure to give serious attention. We also went into some depth on Apple's new service that even Google is praising and is going to be a major competitor of theirs, right there in the same arena. So here we go with Ken and Matt.

Matt Gagnon
It is 738 on a Wednesday morning, which means it is time to talk to Craig Peterson who joins us now. Craig, how are you this morning?

Craig Peterson
Hey, it is, he does, and I'm doing well this morning.

Matt Gagon
Welcome back to the program.

Ken Altshuler
Craig my keyboard on my MacBook Pro keyboard keeps falling off. I am getting quite irritated. I'm going to bring it back, and they're going to have to send it to get fixed with a whole new keyboard. I'm not getting my computer back for a week. It has got to stop this insanity. It's got to stop.

Craig Peterson
Ken such a first world problem. Apple has, I think they still do, have a program for businesses, they had a program you would pay them a few hundred bucks per year. And they would give you loners and everything else if your machine had a problem.

Ken Altshuler
That is okay I could use Dropbox, and I could probably access it remotely. But you see Craig, nobody uses Word Perfect but me, anymore.

Craig Peterson
I was about to say that. Yeah, I'm glad you said it. Not me. No word perfect. There are still some lawyers out there that do that.

Ken Altshuler
It's the greatest ever made. Why would anybody use MS Word, it just sucks?

Craig Peterson
Well, I yeah, I was a big fan of WordStar to

Ken Altshuler
I used WordStar, too.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, I used to like that a lot. Then WordPerfect came along was perfect for attorneys. A lot of attorneys adopted it. Then I moved into Emacs. But I'm a geek. And it's not really for text editing. And I've used some others like TeX and LaTeX and Roff, and man all kinds of different typesetting tools and stuff over the years. I get you like that WordPerfect for your work again. Well, back to your keyboard. You've got that first generation of Apple's butterfly keyboard.

Ken Altshuler
That's correct. They'd said that they are not on the fourth version of it.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, they keep making changes to try and fit. What they did is they that they designed it so it would be small and light and narrow. They keep making this thing smaller. My son has one of these, and I think it's a second or third generation of a butterfly keyboard. I tried it, and I don't like it. I didn't feel of it. Right. But there's a certain point where they have to cut their losses. You know I learned on mechanical typewriters, right. 100%. Mechanical. Then a teletype, TTY 33. Back in the day. I liked the motion. I enjoy the click-clack, and it's big deep motion. I don't know, I think it's these kids, it's Matt's generation.

Ken Altshuler
It is magic.

Matt Gagnon
I don't know anyone, if you call me that, again, I'm going to come over there and punch you in the face with a baseball bat.

Ken Altshuler
See how angry they are? That generation. I do have a portable Bluetooth keyboard. However, the problem with that is, when you use it with the MacBook Pro, you have to put it so far out, that you can't see what you're typing because it's so far away.

Matt Gagnon
Nobody knows what you mean

Craig Peterson
You need to go to the dollar store and get a different pair of glasses. That will work for you. I have three different pairs of reading glasses, three different strengths, depending on how far away my screen is away. And so on might be all you have to do is you need a prescription. Thank God I don't need a glasses prescription. I need reading glasses. I have like one and a half, one and three quarters and twos. Sometimes I have to put two or three pair at the same time. If I need to read, the faintly printed model number on the back of a Mac.

Ken Altshuler
I take a picture of it and then enlarge it, to read those.

Craig Peterson
I've got a magnifying app. Matt, you can go away for a while.

Ken Altshuler
What's the name? Because I could use one.

Craig Peterson
I don't remember. I type in magnifier, and then it comes right up. But It's fantastic. It just it goes into super zoom mode and makes it easy to see. But you know that the high tech problems we have Apple are now kind of admitted they have a problem with a keyboard but not totally. But try some different reading glasses. That's what I do.

Ken Altshuler
I have to get the keys fixed. I've got an appointment at the Genius Bar tomorrow. The heart of geniuses I must say, and speaking of geniuses, why are murderers and rapists upset at technology, prey tell?

Craig Peterson
Yeah. What do you know about the Golden State Killer? You guys everybody's pretty much familiar with the this is the case of out in California. In California, where they had several murders, this was decades ago. They were never able to solve them. Then what the police did is that they went online, as many of us have done, to one of these DNA testing companies. I've done it, and my family's done it. Well, what happened is that when people have done it.
In many cases they have shared their DNA information to find family members. And frankly, that's kind of cool. Sometimes, you'll find second, third, fourth, fifth cousins. Anyway, they go into these public databases, and the terms of views allow anyone to go in and search and try and find family members. Well, in the case of the Golden State killer, they found that it was an ex-cop responsible for the killings. At least, I think that that's might still be an allegation. I don't know, if he's actually been convicted, yet. Well, now we're seeing the same thing happening in another case. But in this case, both parties have conceded that okay, you're, you're obtaining of the evidence was legal. But Ken, this is a really, interesting question because the police used one of these public databases of DNA that people are using to share to find other family members. From that public DNA database that gave them a clue as to where to look. When they started looking more closely at this family because the DNA indicated that it was someone within you know, a few relatives of the suspect and narrowed it down to this one guy. They were able to get, I think it was like like a coffee cup or something, that was discarded by the guy at the crime scene. They pulled the DNA off of that and found it to be an exact match from you know, DNA is never like 100 hundred percent, but consider, yeah, an exact match. And so now they pulled him into court. It's a real, exciting case with unique problems, as you know, from the Legal side. How far does it go? Both sides conceded that, okay, that they legally obtained the initial DNA information, so there will be no challenge in court on that point. However, here's another side of this as well, that is the online website that the police used has since hanged their terms of service. Now they are no longer allowing police to do searches for DNA matches.

Ken Altshuler
Why? It makes no sense.

Craig Peterson
They're afraid that people are not going to put their DNA up or do searches any longer, for fear that the police might get involved or their DNA might get used for solving a crime. I agree with you. I don't know why you wouldn't, but, but that's why. It is one of the most significant sites out there for this public sharing of DNA information. They changed the terms of use two days after the police, apparently used it to find this guy. That brings up an interesting question. And I agree with you can I don't know what Matt saying, but you know, why would they do that? But should there? Should there be a law? Reminds me of something my dad always used to say. "there ought to be a law against that," or for that, or whatever. It will put a little bit of a kink into some of these police investigations.

Matt Gagnon
All right, Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us now as he always does at this time on Wednesdays, Craig, the other day, I was signing my son up for soccer, whatever, and I couldn't for the life of me remember the login thing that I had created last year for the site. Like the week before that I had to log into something else that I hadn't logged into in a year. It happens to me pretty frequently. I just had to change my stupid password on this dumb computer. I have about thousand 1000 logins that I need, you know, in my head at any given time, and they are continually making me change my passwords and everything else. I can never keep it all straight. Is someone going to save me?

Craig Peterson
No. You're doomed?

Matt Gagnon
Oh, no, that's not the right answer.

Craig Peterson
Well, you already know about Facebook? Are you've seen sites that say to click here to login, with Facebook. And you've seen websites that do the same thing with Google, you know, use your Google login. There's a few of those out there. I have used them once or twice to see how they worked. I don't personally use those. Well, now Apple has come out with their login. It's a multiple login service, and you know by now that I like almost everything Apple is doing nowadays. They are trying to show "Hey, listen, we're going to keep your data safe, we're not going to keep it, we're not going to share it because we don't have it." "We're going to keep that information other than enough information that's required to get you logged in." I think that the fascinating thing about this is that with this multiple logins, single sign-on thing, that Apple's come up with, oh, btw, it's not quite available yet, but it will be. Apple has deals in place with almost everybody. It is going to be very big. Their concept is better than some of the others. Google has come out and said, "Hey, listen, we don't keep that information, either." Well, this is a company that used to say don't be evil, right, Google said. Google came up with a tacit recommendation for the Apple sign-in service saying, "Hey, listen, this is a read going to be a very, good thing for the internet although we don't share our information." They think this is going to be better, much better than normal logins. Not only do people forget them, and of course, many people misuse it them by using the same password, the same email on multiple systems. It's a bit of a problem. I think that you know if I was going to use one, once the Apple ones when it comes out, that's what I'd use. Under no circumstances would I trust Facebook at all with my data. I never use the Facebook Single Sign-On, on other sites. I don't use the Google Sign on, because frankly, they're trying to collect all of the data they can in the world and I don't trust them. The bottom line with Apple, If I am going to trust somebody at this point. They're the guys I trust, today.

Ken Altshuler
We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru, who joins us every Wednesday at 738. You know, the people on our radio station makes us take a security test all the time. Now, are all the CEOs and business owners that conscientious?

Matt Gagnon
Are we way ahead of the curve?

Ken Altshuler
Well said.

Craig Peterson
Matt, Is that true? Or are they just giving Ken the test?

Matt Gagnon
Sadly, Craig, I have to report that they give it to me as well.

Craig Peterson
Well, I'm glad to hear that. The techniques and bad guys are using keep changing, and frankly, we have got to keep our employees up to date.

Matt Gagnon
Okay, that's fair enough, Craig. But there's a man in a gorilla suit in the video.

Craig Peterson
Really?

Matt Gagnon
And I can pass the quiz without watching the videos.

Craig Peterson
Or in a Bunny Suit, one of the two, right? Yeah, you know, we got to get back to the brass tacks of security and making sure employees are up to date at that is a good start. You don't want to overburden them by continually doing some of these pieces of training. I've seen a lot of them. We signed up for a company that provided us with training videos that we could provide your customers. I watched them and about pulled my hair out and stabbed by eyeballs out. They were so bad. We stopped using them. Now we send out a little notification email. Okay, guys watch out for this with a couple of samples, and maybe once in a while a short one to two-minute video explaining it. However, we need to get back to the brass tacks, everybody. That's the bottom line. And that means, the password stuff. Now we've got the NSA doing though this is the first time, it is unprecedented. Ken and I and may Matt, I think you're old enough to remember that the NSA used to stand for no such agency because the federal government denied it even existed. Well, now it's gotten to the point where the NSA has a warning out right now about cyber attacks. They are warning that this could be the worst ever worldwide computer shutdown. It's just incredible. It is all about BlueKeep and some other stuff. Why could this be the worst ever? Remember, two years ago, almost now, we had the shutdown to hundreds of thousands of computers around the world because of an attack - WannaCry and Petya/NotPetya. At the time it was worst ever. It all happened because we were not covering the underlying security best practices. We're not doing the brass tacks of security. We're not making sure we've patched our systems. We're not making sure we're following the right schedules. I have yet to go into a company and find that they've got their basics in order. I don't blame them for having you guys take these little tests. I think it's frankly, generally speaking, an excellent idea.

Matt Gagnon
All right, Craig Peterson, our tech guru, joins us this time every Wednesday. Craig, we appreciate it. As always, thank you so much. We will talk to you again next week, sir.

Craig Peterson
Take care, guys. Bye.

Ken Altshuler
Thanks a lot. Alright. So we're going to take a quick break.

Craig Peterson
Hey, everybody, have a great day. I'll be back Of course, with my weekend radio show, heard in the Northeast and throughout the Northeast.

In fact, and it'll be a whole lot of fun.

Of course, we will be talking about all the newest tech news out there. As we readily quickly heard, we are working on getting ready for our big summer of security coming up. We're going to do it. Need information, email me at Craig Peterson dot com.

Have a great day, everybody. Talk to you later. Bye-bye.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

 

Jun 17, 2019

Craig was on with Jim Polito. Today, they discussed the latest goings on with Huawei and China tech manufacturing, the unprecedented actions by the NSA about the latest Microsoft vulnerability and Russia hacking and our response.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Week After Week Vulnerability After Vulnerability 

CEOs and Business Owners Aren't Taking CyberSecurity Seriously - And Are Facing Huge Penalties

Do you have a Chinese smartphone?  Huawei is the 2nd largest smartphone manufacturer in the world, but they rely heavily on U.S. tech for their production.  President Trump said enough.

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/18/2019

Security Summer, NSA Warning on Microsoft Vulnerability, Russia Hackers, China technology issues

Craig Peterson
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here, I guess I'm committed now. Yes, I am going to do a summer security summit. You're going to hear why the security summer summit is essential. We're getting closer to having to do it, now. I was on with Jim Polito this morning. We discussed some of the problems currently inherent in our relationship with China, and what does that mean to our military to our defense. What's China doing right now? What's Russia doing right now? I also talked about real-world stats from this week that I have seen. And what those mean? So, you know, you can listen, and you can hear it, I think this is one of the best segments I've ever done. So, if you've ever liked my show, you're going to love this today. We're going to solve a few of your problems as well. So, here we go with Jim Polito.

Jim Polito
He is the man the myth, the legend, the Tech Talk guru and our good friend Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir.

Craig Peterson
Good morning, man. Have you seen Huawei stuff? Are they in trouble or what?

Jim Polito
I love that you say why way. And no one knows how to spell it. Being the massive Chinese communications company, Huawei? And it's spelled with an A. Don't ask me why. Yes, I have. And I'm anxious. I just read that. Is it the F 35. fighter, Jeff? That had one of the circuit boards in it made by a Chinese company? I don't think I like that.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, we've had some issues with those before. Yeah, we have the F 35? A, B and C are amazing aircraft, by the way, they kind of nailed it. Did you see, by the way, Turkey, it looks like we're not going to ship them any more military gear? And Poland wants some of our f 35's. There is some very cool stuff, Right? Yeah. Here's the problem and we've had them before, we had some upgrades made to some of our older fighter jets. And they required a new processor board. So, the software was mainly the same. They just wanted the more modern, faster chips. It's like, you might be running a new version of a piece of hardware and still running Windows 10, or Mac OS, for instance. We got these boards in, and thank goodness, we did some in-depth testing on them. Why? Well, it turned out that China manufactured them and the chips had some designed and embedded software to allow a third party, get some information and possibly even take over our fighter jets. So I'm glad that this whole thing is going on with President Trump and China, where we're now putting these tariffs on. We now have manufacturers, U.S. manufacturers who have already moved some of their manufacturing out of China, China. Yeah. Some of its back in the states and Apple is beginning to make some of their gear now in Texas, from soup to nuts.

Jim Polito
I don't have any problem with that. So, what's Huawei doing now?

Craig Peterson
Well, Huawei, of course, came out and said, Hey, listen, there's no link between the Chinese government and us. Just because we're socialists and the government owns us, and we're part of the People's Liberation Army, that doesn't mean you shouldn't like us. So, they're saying there's no link. Well, you know we have banned, Huawei from getting access to any U.S. technology. Google's cut them off from Android, chip manufacturers have cut them off from their chips, etc., etc. Now they are admitting, Well, maybe just maybe, our revenues are going to be down a bit, perhaps $4 billion. This year?

Jim Polito
Couldn't happen to a more helpful bunch of guys. No, look, Here's the deal. I don't mind trading with anyone. Part of the reason that we keep our automobile industry, alive and well in this country, is that during World War Two, and we had to mass produce, aircraft, tanks, all those other vehicles. We took all those car factories, and you ask anybody who's a serious car collector, and say, hey, yeah, I want a car. I want a G.M. from 1943. Sorry, no such thing. That's because they were putting out B-17 or something else in that plant. Same thing with Ford. But I worry that Craig, you know, we do a lot of that production for electronics and gadgets overseas. Isn't that going to be the same and the next war as a factory that built cars in World War Two?

Craig Peterson
Well, there are a couple of interesting points here. One, you're right. And here's why. We've got for instance, of you know, the whole Clinton selling our uranium to Russia, right? If we go to war, forget about it. We're not there. We're going to seize that just like we if you buy a Bayer aspirin, right. The whole Bayer company was taken over by the United States in World War Two. TaDa it is a U.S. company right, so there's that side of it.
On the other hand, when it comes to making chips, you have foundries that have to grow these crystals. It's a fantastically exciting process. Right, here in the northeast, right where we're at right now, digital equipment corporation used to have a foundry, here. A bunch of Texas Instruments, a bunch of different companies all had foundry plants, and they were growing and making their chips. What came of those them when those buildings went for sale? They destroyed them before the premises got sold. We didn't want someone else to get a hold of the technology on how they grew the chips and how they did all of this, right? We have almost nothing left here in the United States. Intel, yes, they're making some stuff here. AMD is making some here, and other people are. If, for instance, we went to war, would we need to wonder if our f35 has the U.S. made in control technology? We could, but the problem is kind of what you just outlined. You won't be able to find a chip to put into your computers like you couldn't find your G.M. car during the war. You won't be able to get chips for consumer use, etc. We have a limited capacity to make these things and what capability we do have, would go entirely towards the war effort. But remember what Putin said, he said, the next war is going to be over ones and zeros. Yeah, it is going to be a cyber war. What is one of the best ways for cyberwar, then to maybe infiltrate my boot block with an infiltrated Chinese plan. Or, of course, China is already doing things against us coming against us and sending us poorly designed circuit boards. Boards that are guaranteed to fail. Boards that are designed to collapse once the jet takes a hit from a microwave beam, let's say, it's enough for that chip to fail, as it isn't adequately protected. They design these things that way. Anyway, we have got some issues here. But I've got to say good news. Apple is very upset with our friends at Intel because they've messed up some of Apple's production abilities, they want to come up with new equipment, Intel's been slow, everybody else is faster now. I predict by the end of this year that Apple is going to have a low-end laptop that does not rely on anything except U.S. designed and produced Apple chips, entirely, including the central processing unit. Excellent news, I think overall, for the U.S. and our economy and, and for our, hopefully never, future war footing.

Jim Polito
We're talking with our good friend, Craig Peterson, at the end of this segment, we're going to give you a number. And that number. Will, if you text my name to it will connect you with Craig. You'll be able to get this information. A lot of other excellent information. Standard data and text rates apply. Craig, I want to ask you, It came out this week, that there that the United States was hacking into Russian power grids. And you know, there were those, the Trump administration rather upset that some of this news got out. Then that, you know, became the story? Well, maybe Trump wasn't told because they didn't want him to know, we might have shared that information. Hey, the bottom line is, Craig, from your perspective, I bet we should be hacking into their power grid because they're breaking into ours. We need to be able to show them just like we did during the Cold War, that there's mutually assured destruction. If you knock out our power grid, we will immediately knock out yours. It'll be just like we fired missiles at each other, which actually, is what prevented us from firing missiles each other, the MAD doctrine or mutually assured destruction.

Craig Peterson
Yeah, this is such an interesting question. And unfortunately, only we've got a couple of minutes here. Here's how I look at this. Let me give you a statistic, a personal statistic, you know, already that what I do is I help businesses, large and small with their security. I help multinational corporations down through little doctors and dentists and distributors and manufacturers, right. So, I've been in the middle of this now for about 30 years, and just this week, I was looking at a firewall for a small company, and I was looking at their website and saw as many as five hack attempts against their website, per second. Wow. That is per a second, okay. If I can extrapolate numbers here, we're talking about Russia billions of times throughout a week or a month, trying to get into our U.S. controlled systems. And, you know, in answer to your MAD question, I think you're right. President Trump authorized our Cyber Command to start offensive operations. And that means our Cyber Command is now doing what everybody else has been doing for 10-plus years, look at what happened with Sony and North Korean hacking. We were sitting on the sideline. I'm glad to hear we're getting offensive. I'm not surprised in the least that we were into the Russian power grid. Poor little Putin over there. I am getting a little teared up, you know, heaven forbid, he's getting hacked. I have seen evidence of this forever, China and Russia. But I have to tell you this, looking at these stats, with my customers getting nailed, with millions of attacks. Russia and Putin are actively coming after us, actively pounding us, looking for ways to get in. Think of that, people, they are beating everything all the way around, not just as a gate, but on all the walls, looking for doors, the windows, everything,

Craig Peterson
That's what they're doing right now. And I, and I must remind everyone, that is is okay, it's fine. If you don't use me as your computer security company. I get it. Okay. The NSA did something unprecedented. They warned us, the National Security Agency - our hackers in chief, if you will, that there is another major, huge, huge security hole in Windows, I mean, huge. We could see the whole world's computers go down again, as we did a year and a half ago, almost two years ago. The reason that that could happen is that people and businesses haven't patched their systems. It's that simple. We're ignorant. We've got people who are saying, Well, you know, I'm scared, it didn't work last time. I don't know what to do. It's too confusing, etc., etc.

Jim, I'll tell you what I'll do for the audience here. I'm going to have a security summer summit, and It is going to be free, 100% free. We're going to get back to the brass tacks because I am seeing every one of my clients getting nailed, something awful. (not successfully but attacked none the less) I don't want that to happen to anybody here. I get texts from the audience almost every day with questions and problems. I get emails nearly every day. I don't want this to happen to anybody out there listening. Those who are listening here, you care. You're trying to do something. However, your vendors aren't taking care of you. I'm going to show you how to do it yourself. I guarantee it. I'm going to do that. Give me a few weeks to get something together. But that's going to happen this summer because we are under attack like we have never been before. All right.

Jim Polito
It is why we have our tech talk guru here. Now look, text, my name to this number 855-385-5553 just text Jim, to 855-385-5553 standard data and text rates apply. You'll get all this great information. When there's valuable information like he just discussed, it'll get to you. He will not sell your name. He will not try to sell you anything. And it's an excellent service that our friend Craig Peterson offers to our listeners. Craig, thank you so much for the time, buddy. We'll talk to you next week.

Craig Peterson
Take care, Jim, thank you.

Jim Polito
Great session with Craig Peterson. A final word when we return. You're listening to the Jim Polito show, your safe space

 

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Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

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Jun 17, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath this Monday morning. Today they talked about the Microsoft vulnerabilities, their newest vulnerability and why and the NSA issued a specific warning and said you must patch. We also talked about the Iranians and their attacks on infrastructure, The New York Times revelation that ticked off President Trump and what he had to say about them. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/17/2019

Craig 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody, Craig Peterson here. We are getting ready for our security summer, this is going to be a whole summer's worth of, well it will really be kind of a summit. There will be lessons twice a week. You can attend the live sessions, or you can also go ahead and get yourself a golden ticket if you'd like to, so you will be able to go through it all. This summer, we are getting back to the brass tacks, the basics of what you need to do. We're going go through all of the basics, that's what the security summer is all about. Make sure you keep an eye out for that or send an email to me at Craig Peterson dot com. If you're interested in participating. As I said, it is absolutely free. I'm concerned about people who just don't have the money and are, you know, really in need of help. In my 30 years of doing computer security stuff. I have never been in a business where we did any sort of an audit, or we took over the IT or the security, that did not have security problems. No matter the business, the size, or how good their people supposedly were. That is why I know there are smaller companies out there that just can't afford to pay for one of my more prominent courses. That is why this is free. Now you can upgrade, right, if you want to. But it is excellent information and free. I've done these types of courses in the past, and the responses have been fantastic. I want to help everybody out, I want to make this affordable, and affordable equals free. Then we are going to make it available as well via the golden ticket that way you can get the whole security summer and keep the security summer information. I am doing this information will be going away right as soon as the summer's over and we're only leaving the individual classes up for two weeks. So once the summer's over, it'll be taken down, unless you upgrade to the golden ticket. However, you will have two weeks to watch each one of these videos before I take them down. And I think it's important to, to watch them right to pay attention. And I'm doing the two-week thing so that people will have the motivation to take action if we do that, right? We all have our lives and are just so busy, so many things going on, that many will say hey, listen, I'll do this in three weeks, I'll do it at the end of the summer, I'll have time in September, but it never gets done. It is one of the most critical things you can do for your family and for your business. If you are breached, man, oh man and not just hacked into, but you end up with one of these new zero-day attacks. Or maybe it's something like Equifax had, the patches have been out for more than six months, and they hadn't done the updates they needed to do. Any of those things can cause great heartache on your part. If your business, it can put you out of business. And we've got some new statistics will be talking about coming out of some further studies showing how things really have gotten worse, but how it will affect you. So all of that's part of our security summer, it's going to be absolutely free. Send email to me at Craig Peterson dot com. We will have a sign up ready, here pretty shortly, probably next week for you. So, I'll give you that link. And if you want to kind of poke around, it's going to be at security summer.com. How's that for simple, right? It's not there yet. You try and go there. It's not going to go anywhere, as it is not yet released. We're putting it up, at security summer summit, I think is what we're going to call it security summer summit dot com. It is going to be me teaching a lot of this stuff. We're going to have a few guests on talking about things talking about their hardware and software, and how it works, so that you can make some informed decisions about what you might want to use and what you might want to do. We'll be having all of those guys and gals on our Security Summer summit.com. That's where it'll be.

Anyhow, here we go. This morning, I was on with Mr. Jack Heath. And as usual, we talked about a couple of different things, including a high-security alert came up from the NSA this week. And I kind of went off at a bit of a tangent too, because I thought it was necessary. So, here we go with, Jack.

Jack Heath
All right, Craig Peterson, our Tech Talk guy on this Monday morning. And Craig. Good morning. How are you? Hey, good morning, doing well. Good. What's up, what do we have this morning on our tech talk side? You always tell us how to kind of avoid being victims of scam or spam or you name it.

Craig
Yeah, exactly. A lot is going on out there. Well, you might remember about 18 months ago, the world was hit with one of the worst attacks ever. It brought down huge corporations and government offices, it was a terrible thing. Well, we've got some significant warnings out there right now. Even the NSA has stepped in and been providing some notifications of their own. I want to warn everybody I know this sounds like a broken record. Right? Make sure you're patched up. We have something even newer, Iran has been in the news, of course, a lot recently. There was just a break in, apparently of Iranian bad tech guys, their hacker groups, and the Iranian tools were released. Now you might remember back that the NSA tools have been stolen, and were used for hacking as well. And you might think that these incidences are kind of dropping off, Jack. But they are accelerating because we're getting more and more government involved now, as well as organized crime hacking each other. And then we had just over the weekend, President Trump coming out and talking about the New York Times, saying that what they did was traitorous, when they came out and said that we, the United States, was hacking Russian power plants, and have been putting malware into them. So, this whole thing is getting crazy, and unfortunately, it's just the very beginning, Jack.

Jack Heath
Yeah, there's been some reports over the weekend on that. Of course, you know, it just seems that we're not going to be able to, you know stop it. And those speaking of the power grid, and I'm not saying it was any kind of malware but in Argentina, the 10s of millions of pounds 10s of millions of people without power in the in the dark because of a problem with their grid. So, scary stuff. All right, Craig, anything else before we let you get on with your Monday?

Craig
Well, I want to say to everybody, just get back to the brass tacks here. That's what matters. Get back to the basics. Make sure you're patching, make sure you're up to date. That's going to help protect you. We have got some really cool stuff going on as well. Some more news and the autonomous systems that are out there. And I've got a couple of articles about that up on my website as well, at Craig Peterson dot com.

Jack Heath
Craig, thanks for the Tech Talk check and thank you, Craig Peterson.

Craig
Take care, Jack

Craig
All right, everybody, remember is not up yet. It will be up soon. But you can always email me at Craig Peterson dot com, we'll make sure you find out about this. Again, a complete series of free training this summer. You can upgrade and get the whole summit if you want to keep it, as well. However, it's available for free because I want to get this information out to as many people as we possibly can. It's that important. Yes, it is. Security summer summit dot com is where it will be, but it's not there yet. We've had a busy year. Take care, everybody an I'll be back tomorrow.

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Jun 14, 2019

I am planning a Security Summer for my listeners.  I will have some free courses.  I will also introduce you to some of the software that I use for my clients and how you can use it too.  Also, I have some limited opportunities for businesses who have had enough with their security issues to work with me and my team and put their security problems to rest once and for all.   So watch out for announcements on those.

The News Industry says Google is skimming billions from them -- listen in to hear the whole story.

Have you thought about automation and jobs in the future? Microsoft planning for future jobs in a unique way, I'll be talking about this more today.

The NSA is warning about the seriousness of a new vulnerability -- solution PATCH now! I will tell you why they think it is so dangerous.

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript: 

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/15/2019

Is Google really skimming billions from the news industry, Microsoft planning for future jobs in a unique way, The NSA is warning about the seriousness of a new vulnerability -- solution PATCH now!

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Come on, is this true? Could it be true?

Are publishers losing money because of Google and Google's news service?

Or is it getting better?

We'll talk about that interesting article from New York magazine and the big complaint by the New York Times.

This last week, we've got another hack to talk about! My gosh, this is just amazing. Another Federal Government database got hacked this week. In that database, there were tons of travelers information, including photos that the government's been hoarding, er I mean collecting.

By the way, you might remember, I was told you a couple of weeks ago about the feds putting in these new facial ID systems at some of the airports, ports of entry various places and the success that the beta test they conducted. They were using that to track people who were here legally or illegally, with an emphasis on illegally, for various reasons, I think, frankly and they also found some impersonators. So we'll talk a little bit about that and what happened there.

Next, we have a murder trial that is getting underway involving a guy arrested last year. Now you've probably heard about the Golden State killer, but I don't think you've heard about this guy. We were hoping this case might set some seriously relevant precedents going forward, but it looks like it might not. However, maybe it will happen in some future cases.

Of course, this is Craig Peterson. And we talk about tech every week right here. And more particularly, we tend to talk about security, because for close to four decades, it has been my passion. I first got hacked back in the early 90s. It was a worm, you know, think of computer worms like the kind that happened here or what a year and a half ago when millions of people were majorly inconvenienced by the what happened with the WannaCry worm that crawled through the internet and ransomed machines galore. It bought whole businesses down, except for my clients, right? I gotta, put that out there. We're going to talk about that today, too.

Hey, this week the NSA took an unprecedented step and issued a warning which is something they rarely if ever do.

Also, Microsoft did something amazing that they have never done before, so we'll get to all of that as well.

But let's go back to my original question here today. And that is, frankly, Google and the New York Times. They have well been going at it, and I would call it a fight if you were to ask me. It boils down to a report that came out of the industry. Now can you believe the industry, right? The industry report, this is from the News Media Alliance - Voice of News Media Industry‎. It is an industry group within the publishing news media. You know what, I love that term study because it can be used for almost anything, right? I'm at Starbucks, and I asked a couple of people questions. Well, I just completed a study, and it showed...

Well, in this particular case, the News Media Alliance says, that Google earned nearly $5 billion in revenue by stealing news articles from them.

So how does that work? If you search for something on Google, they will intermix some news articles in the search results and provide you with a little summary. If you go to news.google com, I don't know if you've ever done that, but news.google.com, you might want to check it out. It has new stories on all kinds of topics, including your local news.

How do you get that information? Or I should say, how does Google get that information? Well, they go out, and it does what is called scraping, and it scrapes news sites that are out there. Scraping is an awful thing, frankly. Because there they are, stealing stuff.

So, let's talk about what I do and what other news commentators do. You know, this is an editorial, Right? I'm a commentator on the news. I'm not a writer, and I'm certainly not a journalist. I'm a commentator, frankly. So when I'm looking at an article, you'll hear me talk about it. So, for instance, I'm going to refer to some material from New York Magazine here. And they've got some great quotes in it, and I am commenting about it, perfectly legal, I can do all of that.

Well, how about Google? When we're talking about the Fair Use doctrine that's in place, and it has been forever in our copyright law? Is it fair use for Google to look through a news site, find an article, summarize that article using some machine learning algorithms. They have some programs that rip thru these articles and summarize it, grabbing a sentence here and there, put it all together and put it up on their site. Google did not write that article. Google may have written, you know, a little bit of the stuff they're showing, but typically, they're just stealing the paragraph or so from the article.

If you were not aware, the courts have heard arguments about this very thing, and the way the law stands right now is that Google has the right to do what they are doing because when you click on that search result, it takes you directly into the original site.

You might remember the lawsuits that happened a few years back, on what they called, deep links. These were where various companies were saying, "No, no, no, We can't link to an article," you can only link to our homepage. That was because they wanted people to have the experience of going through their website. Well, the experience of going through the website, of course, was to see the ads on their homepage, while you were trying to find the article you want to see. By going through a few other pages, they were collecting hits on these pages, which gave them more impressions. More impressions meant more ad revenue. Why? They base ad revenue on the number of impressions. It depends on the algorithm chosen, impressions vs. clicks. That is a different type of payment.

Well anyways, they were hoping they'd get more money. Eventually, those died out as the lawsuits began dying out.

So it was decided, no, you can have a deep link, as I do. I have deep links, where I refer to an article, and it says read more typically, you click on that, bam, it takes you right over to the website that has a synopsis of the article or an editorial commentary and then a link to the original article itself.

So Google is being accused by this news media alliance of stealing their revenue. There is a great article, as I said, it's from New York Magazine, and you'll see reference to it up on my website at Craig Peterson dot com. It noted that Google estimated that Google News or product without ads brought in an estimated 100 million dollars in yearly revenue back in 2008. So that's more than a decade ago. So what happened was the played fast and loose with that number, and extrapolated forward saying, well, that hundred million in revenue means an estimated 4.7 billion of revenue in 2018 to Google from news content. I am sorry, but that is total crap. What does that $100 million number mean? It was Marissa Mayer, you might remember her, she floated that number at a conference when she was the head of Google search, a decade-plus ago. So what does it mean, frankly? Well, it means that Google estimated the value of its news service.

Now, remember, they're not running ads, they're not getting money directly off of that. What's the back end? Well, here's the bottom line on the back end, Google is showing news articles. They have them all there on the news.google.com site, and they're putting them into the search results, as well. The reality is that the traffic from Google search to news publishers sites has risen by more than 25%. Twenty-Five Percent. Now, wait a minute. You're complaining that Google is stealing your news articles, which yes, they are, technically. And you're complaining that this is a massive $5 billion hit approximately, to your industry. But yet, you also in this same press release from the News Media Alliance say that traffic from Google search to the publisher sites went up 25%? Doesn't that stat show that Google News is beneficial to these news organizations? I tend to think so. Frankly, I do.

Now you can't deny that Facebook isn't a significant influence out there. Along with YouTube, Hulu, and now Netflix and HBO, and all of these others that have great content available for cheap money. So maybe it's not just losing traffic, because of the, you know, the fact that Google shown it on the new site. Perhaps, it's because the eyeballs are going elsewhere. In the long run, Google is helping them. I don't know. It is all very confusing. I think maybe that's part of what they're intending. It does not appear to be hurting their business at all.

Hey, I was thinking this morning, as I was listening to some music. And I was thinking, you know, I used to have to buy CDs, and before that I used to have to buy LPs, right? Earlier it was 45s and back before that there were 78s, remember those things? I remember playing in my grandpa's basement, and he had a real old Victrola. He always had some extra needles sitting there next to it, so we could put in a new one when they wore out after playing on those old brittle records. It was quite an experience. Anyhow, you remember those days. Well, I was thinking, you know, when we're talking about Google News, and we're talking about streaming new sites, and streaming video, and streaming audio, how things have changed. Right now, if you subscribe to Apple Music, or Amazon music, or Spotify, or you name it, Pandora out there. Right now, if you're willing to pay about ten bucks a month, you can listen to as much music as you want to, from current artists through old artists. I am talking about decades of music, 10s of millions of songs for ten bucks a month, ten dollars, that's less than it used to cost for a CD. Think about inflation, Right?

When you bought a CD, when did those come out, in the early 80s is when they became quite popular. They were more expensive than an LP. Although they cost a lot less to make that an LP, an LP would cost them about two bucks to three bucks to produce whereas a CD would cost them five cents, but hey could charge more for the CD. Why? The music quality was better, Right? The audio experience was better. So, they could charge more. Oh, I get it. Buying one of those CDs in today's dollars is what about 30 to 40 dollars to listen to, to get one CD, to get less than an hour's worth of music. Typically, sometimes it is only about a half-an-hour or less. Now we get it for ten bucks. It is time for the News Industry to wake up. Everything has changed. Everything is changing. That it's the only constant in the universe, Right?

Of course, there's climate change. There has always been climate change. There will always be climate change. No one I've ever heard of denies that. It's just a fact of life. That gets the big question is, have we caused it?

Well, of course not. But we're not going there right now. Right? If we wanted to have a discussion, think about Star Trek, for instance. Where there is a global calamity going on and the globe is warming, or it's cooling. We have to assume that in Star Trek, they've got 1000 years worth of climate studies and AI that can predict the weather, climate, etc.

Unlike us, who can't get our current weather, right? Even for tomorrow. Artificial intelligence is a real potential, and they have a lot of possibilities here soon and in the future. We don't know what's going on and as someone wise once said: "The only constant, is change."

When you're talking about your business, I want you to think about it for a few minutes here. Whether you're an employee, or the owner, or the CEO of the business, what's going to change in the future? Remember, the future is going to be different than the present. It doesn't matter; there will always be change. Well, that's an interesting problem. It's something that, surprisingly, at least to me, Microsoft is trying to address.

What Microsoft has done is they are launching what they're calling an AI hub. AI is artificial intelligence, and while we don't have real artificial intelligence, today, and it'll still be a while before we do. They predicted that by 2020, we'd have AI running around, not so much. We do have machine learning and a couple of other types of technologies out there. But artificial intelligence where you don't have to train it, and it learns all by itself. Where you don't even need to teach it how to play a game, but it can figure it out by observation or whatever. Is that AI or is that machine learning? I think most of us would consider that machine learning. AI is coming, but here's the problem. Whether you call it AI or you refer to it as machine learning, this type of automation is going to disrupt a ton of jobs and a lot of lives. There's a great article, in CNET, about this right now.

Microsoft has launched this AI hub, and they've done it, explicitly avoiding the east and the west coasts. Now, if you think about the schools that are, you know, on the East coast or West Coast. Right here by me, well just south of me, you've got MIT, you've got Harvard, you've got BU, you've got UNH here in my state. There are all kinds of excellent schools here. Head to the West Coast then you've got Stanford, Berkely, USC, CalTech and many others. And the list goes on and on. So, Microsoft said, hey, listen, we need to find a city where automation will have a substantial impact. That may be in the rust belt or the Midwest. We need to train these people. We need to help them to understand AI help them to understand the transition that will take place. Remember, change is the only constant.
During the industrial revolution, we had people all upset. Of course, you don't remember it personally, and neither do I because none of us were alive back then. I don't think. But do you remember the transition from the horse and buggy to the internal combustion engine? Do you remember what happened? What people were doing? What people were saying? You know, we're going to lose all these jobs as teamsters, think of New York City, you had people whose job was to go around with a shovel and a wheelbarrow and clean up after the horses, and not just during parades, right, this was a constant thing. Those people are going to lose their jobs. The people that provide the feed for the horses, the stables for the horses, the ones who breed the horses, that sell the horses, that drive the horses that load the carts and make the carts and make the wheels, and this is all going to change and it is going to be a horrible world.

Well, of course, what ended up happening was the exact opposite. We ended up with even more jobs. That's been the case with all types of technology over the ages. You know, I have got a great article that we wrote up on my website at Craig Peterson dot com, you should probably read if you're a CEO or business owner, because it addresses you and your problems, when it comes to automation. If you don't pay attention to this, you will be out of business. Okay, so it's a great article. Craig Peterson dot com, you have to read it.

So let's get back to Microsoft here. This project that they're doing is intended to upscale people on how to work alongside AI and robots. They're going to create this learning lab to prepare communities for jobs in the years ahead when this frankly, automation are going to disrupt the economy and the workforce. So, where did they go? What are they doing? They're explicitly avoiding hiring PhDs. And nothing against PhDs. I have a daughter working on hers, right now. It's, it's all well and good, but they tend to be very narrow. It tends not to be the real world, mainly when you're talking about people who are going to be losing their jobs to automation. Yeah, there's going to be some positions lost due to automation. We were talking a minute ago about these newspapers, well, they're all going to lose all of the writers as it will be entirely automated once AI kicks in. Then the same thing holds, for the editors, I don't know maybe editors are going to go first. You can still have people who pick some of the subjects, but eventually, AI will take that over two, because it's going to be better at that as well.

Well, Microsoft chose Louisville, Kentucky. Why Louisville? It is because 28% of the jobs in the Louisville area are at risk from automation.
Louisville has a strong manufacturing base, you know, you talked about Rust Belt. That's the definition of it. And in Louisville, about 12% of all jobs are in the manufacturing sector. So, Microsoft is investing in some new energy, some resources in the area. They're going to be building a center downtown, a real training center. They're going to hire four people to run this. They want people who have a four-year college degree or less. They're going to train them in how to train people in AI automation, working alongside automated systems, Right? Putting it all together. So kudos to them, frankly, great quote from CNET here, saying "we're really interested in seeing if we can help onboard people who have a two year degree, or most a four year degree, they're going to empower them with the tools, the resources, they're going to need to help everybody out. We think that in the next ten years, we will see more change in our society than we've seen in the last 250 years. Where that takes us, we don't even know. There's so much potential for us to reimagine ourselves and our community. That also means that we have to get ready for what the future holds for us."

AI is going to eliminate a lot of low-level jobs, a lot of repetitive tasks, and responsibilities that are easy to automate, like the writers that we talked about. Where are people who are already doing that? I don't know? If you read an article, and you say, man, this is not a very well written, the grammars maybe not great. Well, today people are going out and hiring others that are do something called spinning an article. I hired a writer two years ago, year and a half ago. And she was supposed to be writing original articles for me. She knew that. What I would do is say okay, Here are two or three articles on this topic that have some excellent points. Here are the points I want to emphasize. The idea was I would give her those articles. That way, she had an example of the topic, my detail, and then I would tell her what I thought she should put in the article.

That's pretty simple, Right? That's what you usually do. That's how people write books. That's how people get blamed for plagiarizing because they might have just taken a whole bunch of excerpts from other articles put them together, and then you go through, and you rewrite it because it's the expression of the thought that is copyrightable. The ideas are not copyrightable.

So, what she ended up doing was she'd take the article, and she would run it through some software that spun the material. What the software would do is change some of the verbs, some of the tenses move a few things around in minor ways. That way, it would pass the tests that I would run on it, Right? I'd run it through Grammarly and Hemingway and a couple of other programs. By the way, if you've never used Grammarly, man, you have to sign up for that. Be sure to sign up for the pro version, because it helps you with grammar and you will become a better writer as you see the corrections that it makes to your writing. Also in the paid or the pro version, it lets you know if any of the wording you used is stolen and or plagiarized from copyrighted material somewhere else. So I would run it through that and quickly double check it and clean it up because her grammar was not very good. Then we would post it. Well, I began taking a closer look at her work after a little while when I noticed some patterns. I fired her on the spot because it turned out she was using this spinning software. None of the stuff she had written for me was original content. I went back and tried to find everything that we had posted that she had put up and removed it.

That's what's happening with AI. As AI gets more advanced, and not much more sophisticated, just machine learning gets more advanced, more and more of the articles we see are going to be written by machines. It is estimated right now about half of the new content. Half of it, more than 50%, of the original content posted on the internet is, in fact, machine generated. So consider that.

Consider that with your business. What's your business? Is there any chance it could be automated? If you're, you know, an accountant or a tax preparer, automation can easily replace you. In the security business that I'm in, it is getting automated as we go forward more and more. Like the stacks of security software, that we sell at mainstream dot net and the firewalls, they are all fully integrated. There are a billion endpoints that are part of this, and each one is under constant monitoring. We pay to be part of that network and part of that community. That way we know within an hour when something new is spreading and automatically it's taken care of so, our customers don't get hit with it, Right? All of that happens, but we know it's going to be changing. So, keep that in mind.

At Craig Peterson dot com, got have a great article that we wrote, we did not spin it up on the website right now. It's aimed at CEOs and business owners, and it's talking about what's going on. We've only got a couple of minutes left.

So really quickly here. Maine became the first state in the Union that's prohibiting Internet Service Providers from selling users personal data, without explicit permission to do so. It is from futurism com. It may be the most comprehensive data privacy law in the US. And here's why this is from The Hill. It's the first data privacy law in the US that doesn't put the burden on consumers to make sure they've opted out of the company's privacy infringing practices.

In other words, you have that by default. It's going be interesting to see. Well, I'll let you know how it goes, and I'll keep you up on it.

Haha, there's so much we didn't get to this week. Cybersecurity all about business, not about consumers.

A great article from Alabama regarding the National Cyber Summit conference in Huntsville that happened last week and the two things that came out of the meeting. 1) to some degree, everybody's at risk. 2) nobody cares, according to Dr. Wesley McGrew. We'll have a look at that useful information for all of you.

A hack on a Federal database of photos of travelers coming into and out of the US occurred recently.

There is a murder trial, that's going to allow DNA evidence from a genealogy site, kinda-sorta, maybe you can read more about that. I have it up on my website from wired com.

Man Oh, man, oh, man. When we go into a company, and one of the first things we do is we install software that keeps all our their services, all of their systems, their servers, their desktops, everything up to date, entirely up to date.

Now, it sounds like when Microsoft releases Patch Tuesday, and you have automated patches turned on, okay, maybe that's going to take care of your Microsoft patches. By the way, we don't do it right then when Microsoft releases them. We wait a few days a week, typically, and test them, unless it's ultra-critical to make sure it doesn't break things, right?

Well, now the NSA is warning about this Windows OS bug. It is a huge bug, a huge deal. Its thought that right now, that particular bug could spread as far as WannaCry from a year and a half ago. Okay, this is huge, huge, huge. You heard it here first. It is a massive vulnerability CVE-2019-0708. If you're my client, don't worry about it. We have you taken care of here.

But not only is the NSA issuing a warning notice about this saying to update your systems.

Microsoft has issued patches to address BlueKeep, that's this bug, including taking a nearly unprecedented step of issuing patches to versions of its operating system going back to Windows XP. It is enormous, huge, huge, massive. Okay, it could put you out of business.

If you're home user, this could lock up your computer, maybe forever. So you've got to take care of this.

I think we're going to try and do a webinar on this. Showing you how to use the free tools Microsoft gives you. There's much more you can do and should do as a business. If you want more information, reach out to me, and we can help you — just me at Craig Peterson dot com that is: me at Craig Peterson dot com. If you have any other questions during the week, you can always text me. I am glad to help you out. Just call 855-385-5553 If you join my email list, you can also keep up to date on technology and let you know about seminars, webinars that are coming went up and other essential things, just 855-385-5553 and check to the newsletter from this morning.

As well as, of course, Craig Peterson dot com and have a great week ahead. Take care, everybody. Bye-bye

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Using You for Profits

Multiple Logins The Bane of Modern Online Life

Technology and Databases have Murderers and Rapists Crying Foul

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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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Jun 12, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. This morning,  we touched on a whole bunch of topics in the news. We discussed whether we should trust Google.  We talked about Autonomous vehicles and the societal implications and I talked about two-factor authentication and how you can protect yourself from sim-jacking.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

You Need Two-Factor Authentication Even If Google Screwed It Up?

 

Autonomous Cars — Are they ready for Prime Time?

Why Are We Still Trusting Google? 

 

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/12/2019

Can You Trust Google?, Security Summer, Autonomous Cars, Two-Factor Authentication

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Craig
Good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here. I heard "Big Papi" took his first steps in the hospital today. So, that's good. It brings back thoughts of everyone that has family and friends in the hospital that aren't celebrities and people that are injured. My thoughts and prayers go out to everybody every day. It's just a reminder of how fragile things can be in this life. This morning I was on with our friends Ken and Matt up at WGAN. And as usual, we spoke about a few different things. We had quite a little conversation about trusting Google, should you trust them? Can you trust them? There was a surprising revelation that came out, in fact, just last week about them, and what they've been doing, during the previous 14 years, a significant security problem. We had a chat about two-factor authentication, and I gave them workaround, a way to make it safe, even if you have to use text messages SMS for two-factor authentication because that's not secure. But there is a reliable way to do it.
We talked about a little bit more of course about autonomous cars which are all in the news again, and what's the safety factor there? How far away are we? I took a couple of different angles than I made with Jim Polito on that discussion today, as well. So here we go. Also, don't forget, we've got our security summer, starting up in July, I will start sending out some emails next week, things have been crazy around here. As you can imagine, with all of the companies now getting hacked, and the losing money coming to me, and you know, everyone in the security business, which, of course, is way understaffed. And shout out to those of you who are trying to get into security, I got another email this last week from someone that was starting into a security career, and he's in his 50s. So there's something to be learned there, I want to encourage everybody. Remember the adage, "You can teach an old dog new tricks." It's a terrible saying. But you can learn a lot of this stuff, you really can. And there's a lot of people out there who have been trying to convince you that you can't do that, really all you need is their little bit of anti-virus software, or whatever it is, you know, they're selling that to you. Because that's all, they have. That's all they know. Well, they're not doing you any favors. They are trying to mess with you. You can learn this stuff. That's what the security summer going to be about this year, and I'm going to be teaching this some free classes. You know, I get paid for doing this too. And if you want more in depth, then you're probably going to want to sign up for one of my courses. But I want to get this information to everybody. Because if you know me well enough, you know, I got hacked. That was 30 years ago, about now, a long time ago. And it scared the daylights out of me. And I started to learn about this and trying to figure it out. It's taken me years, decades, to get to the point where I'm at now. And I am excited to share a lot of this with you.
Just watch for my security summer. If you want to find out more, email me at Craig Peterson dot com, ask any questions that you might have. And I'll make sure you know, when I'm starting this whole little program up, because I want you to be aware of all of the major points here, right, I'm not trying to turn into security experts, that takes quite a bit of work. However, I do want you to be familiar with all of the problems. All the talk about hacks that have happened, how it happened, what should have been done by those companies give you an idea, but as well as what you can do to protect yourself a few tips on how to protect yourself, it's going to be kind of a busy summer. And if you sign up, and you'll be able to get a notification as to when these little courses are going to happen. And I'm going to leave them up for about a week or so you know because it does get stale. And I do need to revisit them. I don't want want to put them up blankly for the world to see forever. So keep an eye out. Email me at Craig Peterson dot com, and now we'll go to Ken and Matt. I want to encourage you guys, and you can learn this. There are the people that just been messing with you. You know the bottom line.

Ken
Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins us at 738 every Wednesday, and this is 738 on a Wednesday, which means you're talking to Craig Peterson. Craig. Welcome to the program, sir.

Craig
Hey, good morning. It is a Wednesday but is it every Wednesday? Today?

Ken
That's a good point. And you know what it is a lie in and of itself because I believe we did not talk to you last Wednesday. So it's most Wednesdays.

Craig
That's true. Yeah, I took a bit of vacation. I'm a motorcycle guy. And I have a motorcycle that is 32 years old. It's a 1987 BMW with 143,000 miles on it now. The only thing I had to do is replace the rear wheel on that bike. It's just been a phenomenal bike. So, I went up to like George in New York, and we rode around with some buddies for a week. And it was just fantastic.

Ken
Well, good. But that doesn't mean tech news stops. I hopped on your website, Craig Peterson dot com. To see what kind of top stories you had there and you have one topic here. Why are we still trusting Google?
Can you answer that?

Matt
Great question. Well, they did say early in Google's history that they that their whole operating philosophy was Don't be evil, right. Are they evil? Now? Did you notice they took that off of their website? Right?

Craig
Yeah, exactly. I don't know why we're still trusting some of these different companies out there. They are selling all kinds of information about us. And, you know, that's not necessarily a bad thing when you get right down to it. Because, frankly, do you want to see car commercials all the time? Or would you rather see a car commercial when you are looking to buy a car, right? And, again, goes back, Matt, to what you've said many times, and that is if you're not paying for something, you might want to consider that you're the product and not the customer. And they have been doing all kinds of things. We're selling our data. But the other big problem that came out very recently, within the last couple of weeks is that in fact, Google has been storing our usernames and passwords for people that were using, basically their G Suite services. But it's been out there for 14 years in the clear. They're pretty good about security, although Android itself isn't the best out there. But now their G Suite customers are a little upset because of what's been out there. I was talking just yesterday with an employee who had been working at a company that was collecting personal information. They were collecting home addresses, phone numbers, and they were taking donations and were selling them. It was a great little company doing just all kinds of super things to raise funds for some good charitable organizations. It turns out they were using Google Forms to collect all this personal information about donors. You know, come on, guys, we cannot trust Google, we're using more and more of these online websites, software as a service. Think about Google Sheets, for instance, as well as Google Forms. And we're putting data in there that may end up getting exposed. We should not be doing that. Think twice about it. In our profession, we refer to this as shadow IT or shadow information technology. Historically, we had these big rooms, these big glass rooms with all of the computers in them. And we had true professionals that were running them, and making sure data was being kept safe, and information was not being stolen and leaked out. Now we've got the marketing department going out and creating contracts with companies that have online services, we have the same thing happening with sales and manufacturing and distribution and our purchasing managers are our data is not safe, and it's never been less secure. So be careful what you're putting out there, what you're given to Google what you're given to these other companies because frankly, it's a real problem.

Matt
Craig Peterson, our tech guru, joins us, most Wednesdays at this time to talk about the world of technology. And today is one of those days, Craig, while you're talking, I'm looking at a story on CBS This Morning about Uber's secret self-driving test facility for their self-driving autonomous cars. I know you had a story also about whether or not autonomous vehicles are ready for prime time. And I think it does beg the question, how prepared for prime time are these things? I know, it's a conversation I've had several times, and it seems like the older the person I'm talking to the more it freaks them out that there's no driver behind the wheel. I think it freaks everybody out. It just freaks out, you know, people in their 50s, 60s, and 70s a lot more than it does everybody else. But statistics, you know, are being what they are, you know, often they can be safer, then human behind the wheel. So what do you think? I mean, are they close to ready to take over the roads?

Craig
Well, I really like I mentioned this yesterday. I liked this story that came out in the Wall Street Journal a couple of weeks ago. And it said that autonomous vehicles, these self-driving cars are 90% ready and all we have left is 90% to go. In other words, yeah, there's a lot of things that look like we're ready to go and it might be just a few more years, and we'll have autonomous vehicles. In reality, it's probably going to be quite a while yet. And you talk about you know, older guys like Ken and myself who are over 30. And we're looking at some of these things. And we're concerned because we've seen failures before. Do you remember Cadillac v 864?

Matt
Back then, I wasn't much of a car person.

Ken
I did have a Mustang in 1960.

Matt
Do you remember the Corvair? Unsafe at any speed?

Craig
I do, and you know, Ralph Nader thing, we still have Nader dots on our tires. But that was an example back in the early 80s of Cadillac trying to make cars more efficient, the engines more efficient, and they had a V-8 engine. And what would happen is if you got onto the highway and you started driving, of course, at highway speeds, you're going down the road, you don't need as much horsepower to keep a vehicle going at a pace as you need to get the car starting at that speed. So they said okay, well, we're going to have the system that automatically shut down cylinders. So you'd be a V-8, and you'd be just roaring up and you getting on the highway and you're often running. Then it would cut back to six cylinders, even four cylinders. The concept was wonderful. But what ended up happening is that engine would say, as you're at a stop sign, oh my I need more horsepower, counteract the braking. Of course, They were not thinking about the brakes very well at the time. And then the car would lunge into the intersection so that you could get t-boned. Fast forward not very many years, and we had the Toyota with a sudden acceleration problem. That turned out to be a software error, where much the same thing was happening. A car would jump into the intersection. We're not going to get into all of the details behind it all. But I think with age comes from experience. And we've had some horrible experiences over the years with vehicles and some of this newer technology. So Matt, to answer your question, a lot is going on the autonomous vehicle space.
In some cases, the cars are much, much safer, you look at millions of miles driven, compare human drivers to these autonomous vehicles, and the autonomous vehicles almost always win. But we also now have prejudices against the self-driving cars, social warriors are, you know, get on your horses here. Because there are people who when there's an autonomous vehicle on the road, or they think it's a ton of mess, they behave differently. Now they've been tested have been run, I don't know if you've seen any of these pictures with autonomous vehicles, where they took the driver's seat, and they made it quite a bit deeper, think of thicker padding on that seat. And they hid a driver inside the driver's position. You could not see them unless you looked exceptionally close. You could not see that there was a driver in the vehicle. Then the driver just drove around, caught down and of course, the cameras everywhere so they could see what the people's reactions were. People were going out of their way to mess with the car. They pedestrians were jumping in front of it. Vehicles were cutting it off, slamming on their brakes, doing everything they could to make it so that autonomous vehicle would get involved in an accident. I don't know. Maybe they're just trying to see what it would do. Of course, it wasn't an autonomous vehicle. There's a human driver in there. We, as a society, as people, are not ready for these yet. And frankly, I think the Wall Street Journal's right - We're 90% of the way there. And honestly, we have 90% of the way to go. Because there are so many things, we haven't even considered yet.

Ken
When he joins us, most Wednesdays at 738, to fill us in on tech news.
We at the radio station. I don't want to be critical of our radio station. However, they started this two-factor authentication. So every
time I get some on my email, they have to send me a text message with a code. I think this is a royal pain in the butt. I want you to tell me they shouldn't do that.

Craig
Okay, can they not do that.

Ken
Thanks so much. Thank you for joining us today.

Craig
I will leave it at that. Yeah, here's what's going to, first of all, there's a big problem with the way they're doing it. That is that there is something called SIMjacking or hijacking of your SIM card. So if they're sending you a text, that is very dangerous. What's been happening is that if you are a target, now they're not doing this in a broad fishing attempt. If you can are a target, and the criminals know they want to go after you, they can now take over your cell phone, and they will get the text. So it doesn't do a whole lot of good from that aspect. We use something called DUO. D-U-O, which is fantastic. For two factor authentication, we use something called Yubi keys, which are very good as well. If your company's requiring you to us a text message for authentication, there is a relatively safe way of doing it. And that is you can use something like Google Voice, assuming your Google account has not been hacked, right. But Google Voice, where there is no SIM card, there is no cell phone that SIM card to hijack. If you use this and it is what I do for places that have to have a text message sent for two-factor authentication. So if they have to send you a text message, it goes to Google Voice. I have my own little phone company, and I use that as well. That way the text message will come in via an app to your phone, you can check the app, and now you're reasonably safe. But yeah, in this day and age, you know two-factor authentication is something that that does make sense. We do have to draw a line, and that one does it make the most sense. I'd like it to authenticate you at most every four hours or once a day, particularly for emails, if you have to do it every time. It gets a little bit old, pretty darn fast. But you know it's the reality of today's world.

Matt
Craig Peterson, our tech guru, he joins us at this time every Wednesday to find out exactly what's happening in the world of technology. Craig, we only have a couple of minutes left. So lastly, I will ask you whether or not you judge everyone on social media? Are you part of the mob that rules everyone?

Craig
Oh man. I am not. I don't jump on anybody's back. I just had that happen to me with a significant hacking group. As you know, I run the national webinars for the FBI Infragard program. I'm pretty visible out there in the security world, right. I do lots of radio interviews and TV and stuff. I posted an article on my website and got jumped on by a small mob out there. We've got to be careful remember it's so easy to say something negative online. Our kids are getting bullied every day. Bullying seems to be quite a habit nowadays. I don't know what happened to free speech. We have these militant people out there these fascist like the Antifas. Total fascist don't want to hear what you have to say. And these internet mobs have become a real thing and a very negative thing. From my viewpoint. Anyways.

Ken
Good news as our tech guru joins us most Wednesdays at 738.
Thank you, Mr. Peterson. We will talk to you next Wednesday.

Craig
Take care.

Matt
All right. Thanks a lot, Craig. We appreciate it.

 

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

 

Jun 11, 2019

Craig was on with Jim Polito. Today, they discussed the latest goings on with autonomous vehicles

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

Autonomous Cars - Are they ready for prime time

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/11/2019

Autonomous Vehicles

Craig
Hey, good morning, everybody. A little update on Ortiz, he got flown into Boston, the Red Sox flew him in. He's a Boston general, I guess he had like a five-hour operation. And they did more to help with his gunshot wound. It's just crazy. Anyhow, Mr. Technology got pumped off this morning. If this happens, sometimes I'm on a phone call. I am, you know, calling in on the phone to the radio station. I'm talking to them. I got knocked off, and I don't notice that I got knocked off, right. Well, it happened this morning. We will go into some detail about autonomous cars and what that all means including automatic lane change features and those types of things. That's what we talked about this morning with Jim Polito. I thought it was interesting. In fact, that's all we talked about. There are some implications to all this autonomous technology that I don't think many people have really thought about

Jim
Here is our friend, one of the most popular guests on the show. And all around great guy Craig Peterson, our tech talk guru. Good morning to you Craig

Craig
Hey, good morning, Jim.

Jim
Craig we've been spending the morning, the gentleman and I talking back and forth about autonomous cars or self-driving cars. We even get into discussing that adult film that was shot in the front seat of a self-driving Tesla while it was going down the road. We don't need to get into that here. What we want to get into is the question, are these cars ready to hit the road? Are they really prepared to hit the road?

Craig
It's an excellent question. The answer is, and I love this, this explanation that the Wall Street Journal had here about a month or two ago. They were saying driverless cars are 90% here. There's only another 90% left to go.

Jim
See you get it. You get the Tech Talk stuff. And then you get a little bit of comedy. Don't forget to tip your server. So yeah, it does seem that way. Oh, yeah, we're there. But don't try to take a left turn.

Craig
Yeah, exactly. There is a long way to go. There's a lot of acceptance problems still. In fact, I don't know if you're aware of this. But right now human drivers are quote, unquote, these so-called driverless cars. You probably haven't seen one of these.

Jim
Oh, you know what I see it the social justice warriors coming out now. Does the car has feelings? I don't know.

Craig
Here's what's been going on. Several companies have been trying to figure out how people will respond to driverless cars. So what they've done is that they've modified these vehicles, so that they change the driver's seat. So the person is actually sitting there. But they're sitting inside the driver's seat, and they eat. Unless you look very closely, you can't tell there's a person there. And then they have the driver drive the car around. So from just a casual observers point of view, it's just a car driving. You know, it's kind of like those, those body suits. I don't know if you've seen them, and you know, they're completely covered head to toe, yet you can see outright, yeah, the same sort of thing, except they're covered with the fabric of the seat. So they drive these things around. And they've been doing experiments trying to figure out what are we going to do, how we're going to do it? And how people are going to respond things like, you know, do we put a cow catcher on the front or pedestrian capture, right? Do we need to have lights indicating, hey, pedestrians, I'm going to start moving forward now, or I'm going to make a left turn all of these types of things? They've been finding people bullying the cars, knocking them on the hood, stepping into the way of them.

Jim
Oh, my God, you can't do that. These cars have feelings.

Craig
Let's make it even worse. Here's what happened here. When these pretend autonomous cars are driving in traffic, and people notice the car, other vehicles will do stupid things to mess with the autonomous vehicle. They will pull right in front of it, they'll break hard. And the quality of the studies is saying that people are trying to confound these cars, overrule them exploit the driverless vehicles. It has the automakers and tech firms really concerned. Obviously, there's one thing to have technology that works great in a lab, or maybe it works great on the streets of Phoenix, which is where a lot of these tests are going on right now. However when you've got a greedy human driver, and we've all seen them, and of course, it's not on the other guy.

Jim
Of course, it's never the guy in the other cars, always.

Jim
The connection is gone bad. He can't hear me. I'm going to drop the call and have him call back. Because we've lost him. Basically, to recap, where Craig was right now is that Yeah, you've got people out there seeing an autonomous car thinking oh, let me see what will happen if I drive in front of it. Or if I do this, it'll mess things up. That is not good. That is not good. And you know what that is? That's going to be an issue. When you have 50%, autonomous cars on the road, and then 50% of people just driving, because you know this is not going to happen overnight, everybody's going to have a self-driving car. It's just not going to work that way. The way it's going to work is some people are going to have them only like right now very few a tiny percentage of people have a car that will self-drive right now. And that's, that's what worries me. Oh, and by the way, if I can just add here a little personal thing. And I think Steve, you'll get a kick out of this is that, I do know that a substantial portion of the people listening to us right now are in cars. So, what if they could be in the car and be watching a video? You know, or listening to you and me?

Jim
Yeah, well, I mean, the two hours of the show is simulcast if you have charter TV three, channel 193. In general, they're sitting there watching Game of Thrones rather than looking at the road. Yeah, yeah. Well, no, but what I mean is I'm talking job security. I'm being very selfish about this concern. Oh, well, we're fine. Were you sure?

Jim
Oh, yeah. These things? Oh, yeah. I mean, I got I just, I understand what Craig is saying, but I don't I just I don't see how and he sort of touched on it. I don't under I don't see how the autonomous vehicles and humans are supposed to interact together. I just I don't really trust either of them. I don't trust humans behind the wheel. And I don't really trust robots behind the wheel, and you couldn't put the two of them together. I think it's a disaster. Know, people. Look, you will talk about looking for insurance claims gamble, throwing themselves in front of cars, people. Yeah, it's one thing to mess with them. It's another thing to be able to sue Tesla and then get rid of your you know, Geo Prism and gets yourself a nice little upgrade.

Jim
Yeah, well, we'll wait a minute. Hold on think I think about this. Okay. Not to be all science fiction here. But you know, with the, you know, with the artificial intelligence, the whole like the matrix, that movie, like the Terminator, that movie. What if all of a sudden, you know, the car gets mad at you for smacking it on the hood? And speaking of slapping it on the hood. Here is Craig back. I'm sorry, Craig, that connection just went south. You couldn't hear us. And you're, you were like in a tunnel. And again, I think it's the phone. I don't think it's anything other than that. I know, the machines are trying to shut you down. But yeah, Craig, I see you smack the car in the hood. And once we have artificial intelligence, it wants to get even with you. And then it's like, the movie Stephen King the book, Christine. And it's, it's running over your car?

Craig
Yeah. Well, here's another aspect of this. And then Sorry, I lost you there I was going on the spin and then nobody. But let's look at, for instance, people's driving culture. And there's a great article that just came out in Fast Company about a week ago, as well. It was talking about people's preference to drive versus flying. What they found is that people today, if it's a five-hour drive, no matter how long the flight is, if it's a five-hour drive, and if they're going to rent a car, on the other side, two-thirds of people prefer to drive. Yeah, and the numbers changed dramatically. If you've got a 10-hour drive, obviously, the vast majority of people want to fly. However, if it's in the tournament vehicle, a truly autonomous where they can have a nap, they can be there reading, they can be working, having meetings, that number goes way up. And what they found is even in the longest drive that they were looking at, which is a 45-hour drive, right now only one in 10 people would prefer to drive themselves. It's a handful. Think about driving to the airport, right all the crap you have to go through. But with an autonomous vehicle that changes to one in six people would prefer to drive themselves on a 45-hour drive, which means a quarter these stats of the airline industry would lose at least 10% of its travelers. And we're also looking at this change, it's also going to make it so that we don't have to expand our roads. They're thinking we could get, you know, 10 years more on the roadways that we're building or expanding than we would otherwise because the vehicles are going to be moving more progressively. You're not going to have somebody who hits the brakes and causes a major slow down and accidents and things. We're not there yet. There are a lot of companies working on it. Remember Fiat-Chrysler, they just broke off their talks with Reneau, yeah. And they turned around. And they got an agreement with his self-driving technology company in California called Brora. We've got another company out now with what's called LIDAR tech. They just got 170 million dollar funding round for self-driving cars. And this is just fantastic technology. And I've talked with the inventors before. This is the this is going to happen. But as we talked about with the Wall Street Journal, we're 90% there, and we only have 90% to go. Because part of the problem, Jim is we don't really even know what problems we're going to. We're going to have just as we talked about, people believe in these autonomous vehicles. Yeah, we're going to be taking small steps and even Elon Musk is aiming towards the small step category now and is stepping back slightly from as a tundras vehicle stuff, but-but they're coming and they're going to be I think they're going to be a godsend, especially when we're our 80s. Right. Well,

Jim
For the elderly, I think, and for people who may have some type of mobility issue. I think they are going to be helpful. Craig Peterson is our tech talk guru. Now we went off on this topic. He's got many more like, Can you still trust Google? So, if you want to get this information, text My name to this number 855-385-5563. So text Jim, or any questions you have 855-385-5553 Alright, standard data and text rates apply, and you'll get a lot of information, and Craig Peterson will not annoy you and not try to sell you something and not sell your name Craig thanks so much for that. We really appreciate the time.

Craig
Hey, thanks. Take care. Jim. Take care

Jim
When we return a final word. You're listening to the Jim Polito show, your safe space.

---

Don't miss any episode from Craig. Visit http://CraigPeterson.com/itunes. Subscribe and give us a rating!

Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

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Jun 10, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath this Monday morning. Today they talked about the Microsoft and the Need to Patch, the increase in Hacking and how the Media contributes to these efforts, The First America Financial data breach, and Intel's big flaw that affects every computer with an Intel CPU since 2007.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles 

Running Windows? Be Sure You Patch! 

Got a Mortgage? Your Information Might Be Included In Massive Hack 

Intel Has A Problem and So do You


---

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/10/2019

Ring Doorbells Can Save Lives - Microsoft Monster Security Bug - Amazon Expanding Freight

Craig
Hey, good morning, everybody. Man, did you hear the news, Big Papi got shot in the back in the Dominican Republic. If you are part of the Boston Red Sox fan nation, which of course I am, but only to the degree that I watched them if they make it to the finals of the World Series. Man, he really helped to win it for the Red Sox a few years back, when they won that pennant for the first time, in forever. That's just crazy. Man, So my heart goes out to all of these people that are so afflicted by violence. Nowadays, it is down, but we seem to be hearing about it, of course, due to the extensive media coverage, instant messaging, and everything else. But it's just terrible to hear about this sort of stuff. Well, this morning, I was on with Jack Heath. And we talked a little about two different things going on right now. We talked a little bit about what's happening with cyber activism and how it is affecting people, even me. Yeah, little old me. We talked a bit about First America Financial a mortgage title company, and what happened there, it was just crazy. We also discussed the simple things you can do that can protect your business from getting hacked, and yourself, if you're a regular home user. So, all of that and more in just a few minutes with Mr. Heath this morning. So here we go.

Jack Heath
Craig Peterson, our Tech Talk guy joins us live on the AutoFair listener lines with a tech talk update. Good morning, Craig

Craig
Hey, good morning, the things have gotten terrible with the hackers out there. Now it is not just the FBI, but the CIA warning people. If you are using Windows, apply all the patches now. There are some significant security problems out there. Just a helpful tip there. However, this is not true for Windows, if you have any Intel computers made since 2007. Intel has a massive flaw that really needs to be patched, and activism looks like it's dead. And Jack, I talked about a little bit on my show and put an article up on my website. Do you remember those activists that called themselves anonymous? Well, I talked a little about them in an article for my website, and it kind of raised their hackles. There were a few heated twitter comments, but it is really quite something to be on the receiving end knowing what these hackers are capable of doing. But whether or not you are a target or electronic bait like me. Make sure you patch and patch quickly.

Jack Heath
Yeah, I tell you, there's always something, and you know, I was talking to someone over the weekend again. You know, when you receive this thing from Wells Fargo or something. Some of the big, big financial holders want to verify your account email, Don't click that, don't use this to verify your account, it is not the bank. It's, you know, a scam.

Craig
Yes, and don't call back the phone numbers. If there's a number of the calls you, don't answer it. I have a friend, and he keeps calling back. He's 75. And I keep telling him, Don't do that. There's a lot of scams attacking the mortgage title company, First America Financial. They leaked millions of mortgage records. And we're talking about people's names, social security numbers, the home, the value of their home, the address of their home, everything bad guys need. This just happened a couple of weeks ago. Most of these occur because people make a mistake. Jack, it is like what you just mentioned. You know, they click through on something or they answer a phone call or even return a call. Bad things are happening, right now.

Jack Heath
And I like to say it's going to get better Craig, but I think with all the technology, sometimes it just is only going to get worse.

Well, I think it's going to get better. The EFF and the FCC have now approved the ability for cell phone providers to block phone calls automatically, so the amount of those should be going down. Also, Apple, in the next release of its iOS operating system, has a built-in feature that's going to really help that a lot.

Jack Heath
You know, Craig, there are a lot of people that just will, whether it's through phishing or something, will continue to find a way around the wall. Craig Peterson Tech Talk. Thank you on this Monday morning, enjoyed it. Thanks, Craig

Craig
Thanks, Jack.

Craig
Hey, everybody, keep an eye out to the security summer stuff is starting up the beginning of July. What that means is we're going to be teaching. I'm probably going to be releasing a couple of short videos every week, we're going to have a special deal for people who want to have more training, and we're going to be helping companies with compliance and self-audits, and all of that sort of stuff. So keep an eye out in your email. And we will let you know when those come up. And if you want on to find out more, just send an email to, me and at Craig Peterson dot com. All right, Take care everybody will be back on the morrow.

 

---

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Jun 1, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. This morning,  we got into a whole bunch here about some lawsuits that are in the works on your behalf against Intel. A little bit more about Huawei, but we went into some details on this whole idea of China owning and providing some 97% of precious metals. And those are now getting pulled into this entire trade battle. And some serious time talking about the wake-up call that new grads are going to get when they report for their first job after Graduation.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Intel Has A Problem and So Do You 

Colleges Graduates Are Up For Rude Awakening When They Show Up For That New Job

The U.S. Has Had Enough of Huawei and China!

 

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 05/29/2019

Intel Vulnerability and Inevitable Lawsuits, Huawei, China and Precious Metals and College Graduates Get A Surprise.

---

Craig

This morning I was on with, of course, Ken and Matt and we spent some time talking about some of the issues of the day. We got into a whole bunch here about some lawsuits that are in the works on your behalf against Intel. A little bit more about Huawei, but we went into some details on this whole idea of China owning and providing some 97% of precious metals. And those are now getting pulled into this entire trade battle. And some serious time talking about a wake-up call for grads. So a lot this morning, and here we go.

 

Matt

738 on a Wednesday means Craig Peterson joins us as he does now Craig How are you this morning?

 

Craig  

Hey, good morning doing well, I hear you getting chickens.

 

Matt

No, I'm not getting chickens. But my wife says she wants chickens. I think that this is a fad. But, hey, it's possible, you never know.

 

Craig

Well, we have chickens. I've had them for years. They're easy to take care of, and they do keep the bugs down. If you want to get rid of the ticks, which are nasty this year, then chickens can help, but Guinea hens are supposed to be the best, but they are loud and obnoxious.

 

Matt

Yeah, no, I'm not going be doing that.

 

Ken

Neighbors would love that, of course, a better than the rock concert and whisper.

 

Ken

So, Mr. Peterson, who you, by the way, you can go to Craigpeterson.com any time and get his newsletter and find out all about tech stuff. Doesn't every computer have Intel in it? Everything has Intel Inside. So, are we all screwed here?

 

Craig

Yeah, this is a really, big deal here. And I just don't get it. They seem to be getting a pass. You know, Ken if you if someone came to you, I know you deal primarily with marital laws,

 

Ken

I do.

 

Craig

But if someone came to you says, Hey, I bought this device to do this job. It's advertised to do it. And it's only doing it about half as well as advertised. Would they have a case? Would there be a class action to suit?

 

Ken

Yeah

 

Craig

It doesn't seem to be happening here. Here's what's happened. Pretty much every Intel chip made back to 2011 has a significant security flaw. The industry is putting it in 9.5 out of 10 as far as vulnerabilities go.

As far as how bad this is, some Intel chips going back afar as 2007 have these flaws well.  Intel has come out and said okay, well, here's what we're going to do, and we're going to release a patch that you can apply for our chips. If you want to be safe, you have to apply this patch. And you have to turn off hyperthreading. Well, Apple, who uses Intel chips in its desktops and their laptops, has said that doing what Intel tells you to do will force you to lose about 40% of the performance on your computer. That is amazing. It's appalling. And Intel is even said Listen, you know if what we'll do, we'll do some patches for the chips going back to 2011. But 2007 forget about it, you guys must buy a new generation of chips if you have a computer with chips made during those five years, that are vulnerable to what's called ZombieLoad, which is the latest nasty piece of hardware problems from Intel. If you have chips made in those five years, Intel isn't going to do anything for you. It is amazing. Now it depends on your circumstance, you know, you may not be fully exposed to this. But this is the second time that there's been a significant flaw discovered in Intel chip security flaw in the last six months. And this one's even worse than the last one. So Intel saying, "Well, is only classifying it as a medium threat." And frankly, if you have a stack of software protecting your computer, and you have a firewall and next generation one that's inspecting everything coming in, including the JavaScript, etc., etc., then, then you might not be very vulnerable.

 

Craig

But the people that are going to be really, really, really ticked off about this are people who run cloud companies. If you are running your stuff in the cloud, think of it like a salesforce.com, Amazon or Microsoft Azure, which have massive clouds of computers, they have to turn on all of the patches and fixes which means turn off hyperthreading, applying the microcode fixes, etc. They are instantly losing up to 40% of the capability of their server speeds. It is going to result in a huge and more likely a massive lawsuit, I'm sure. We're also going to see I would put money on this gentleman. By the end of this year, Apple will say Adios to Intel, and for their lower end laptops and maybe even some lower end desktops, they will no longer use Intel. But will switch over to a proprietary chip design that they've been using for their iPhones and iPads for a while. More and more companies will be doing that. It was just this week, Intel's most significant competitor AMD released stats on how they don't have these vulnerabilities, right.  There's always something. AMD has some new chips using processes that Intel has not even been able to get close to perfecting yet. So AMD is going to be rising dramatically, Intel's going to be falling sharply. I am not giving any investment advice. Okay. I'm not an investment advisor at all. But I'm talking about their presence in the industry. It is an industry game changer. I think in this case, that whole Intel Inside advertisement they used for so many years is going to bite them. Many people in the IT biz are angry with Intel right now.

 

Ken

Talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us now, as he usually does on Wednesdays. And this is a Wednesday ladies, gentlemen, not a Tuesday, it's the second day of the week for us, but it is the third day of the week. Today Craig, when you graduate from college these days, let's say the class of 2019, for instance,  and you head off into the job market. And you know, for years you've had kind of certain types of prospects and certain expectations about what you have to do after you leave college and go into the quote "real world" end quote. Things are changing in that respect. Do you think that kids are going to be having to deal with a little bit more of a higher expectation as they are entering the workforce?

 

Craig  

Yeah, this is an excellent article from the Wall Street Journal, and I put it up as well for some more information. There Wall Street Journal's call this a wake up call for grads. Entry-level jobs that are out there and of course, there are many of them are, is anything but any more. In business, and we could talk about this for a long time, but these jobs have been at the low-end jobs are saying well forget it, we're not going to pay these minimum wages, it's not worth it to us. We'll automate, right. Case in point, being a McDonald's. Many people had their first job at McDonald's. However, now what we're finding that automation and outsourcing, have taken away so many of the lower end jobs. Even when you look at a business like journalism, you used to have people combing other people's newspapers doing clipping, clipping services to get some ideas, beating the streets reading the letters to the editor. Now, that's entirely automated. So graduates now are expected to operate at a much higher level than they ever have had to perform before. And when you're looking at skills, these technical skills required in jobs, the turnover is just so fast and new skills, that your future employers are going to be expecting you to be productive almost on day one. Gone are the days where an employer will say in reality, we don't expect anything out of an employee for the first three months. And then it'll be six months before we get anything truly productive. We have employers out there right now who are looking for people to start making sales calls. For instance, on day one great example, so much. The Wall Street Journal article had quotes in here from IBM, who has 330,000 people who are saying we need people who can adapt. So, if you are graduating from college, and it's anytime soon, you are going to have to adjust and fast. Gone are the days like with my father, who at how old is he? I think he said he was 18 years old, and he started working for the Royal Bank of Canada retiring at 65, from the Royal Bank of Canada. And then he took a contract doing some third-party work for about five years at the Royal Bank of Canada. Now we're going to be switching jobs quickly. We have some industry leaders who are saying the best advice they can give to the younger kids is switch jobs and change careers be very flexible. And that is an entire shift from the generation before mine. We baby boomers even had, on average three to five careers. So things are changing guys in a massive way.

 

Matt

We have on Craig Peterson. He joins us every Wednesday at 738 even though we have Memorial Day Monday and so this is Tuesday for us. Great, I can't pronounce the company. I keep messing it up who-who the one in China. How do you pronounce that? It comes up with bad we're not buying things from anymore.

 

Craig  

Huawei, Huawei,

 

Matt

Huawei, sort of a salad age.

 

Ken

So, explain to us what that's all about. I mean, are they evil?

 

Ken  10:52  

Is it that bad?

 

Craig

The question is, are they evil? Some companies claim that they are and others that claim that they're not. You might remember this scare a few months back where servers and Amazon and elsewhere were found to have some hardware on the motherboard that was not part of the schematics designed by major manufacturers like Supermicro.  They said to Huawei. We want you to manufacture this product, China, and we want this done this way. Here's a schematics make it and ship it back to us. There have been a lot of scares, some of them turned out to be, pretty much, correct. There was a bit firmware put on the boards, maybe a little hardware that shouldn't have been there. And then we announced a trade ban with Huawei and of course, we're in a big fight with them. The Canadians arrested their CFO just a lot about three or four months ago for the United States, who has a warrant out on their CFO.

 

Craig

The problem is that we getting going here is the installation of 5g hardware, made by Huawei. So there was a ban put in place where we could not make a trade with Huawei anymore. Google said, "okay, we're going to honor that, and we will not sell them Android OS anymore." Other hardware manufacturers that were licensing their technology to them, also pulled it back. And the government realized that Huawei is the number two smartphone maker in the world, now that they have passed Apple.  So, they are going to be hurting people here in the US. Now, military bases have stopped selling Huawei, all of what, almost two years ago, because of some of the questions around them. Here's where we stand right now, if you have a Huawei handset, the US Commerce Department has given them a 90-day reprieve on all of their hardware patches, and software and licenses. So, for 90 days, they can send updates, patch phones that people have purchased and can get everything they need, but when that window closes, Huawei won't be able to get any more updates from Google Android for security and other things.  Huawei is scrambling, maybe to have their little version of Android because it's open source, but it gets very complicated. Intel, Qualcomm Broadcom, they all make chips, they have all pulled out of Huawei. If you have a Huawei phone, you have 90 days to get all your stuff together get patches and maybe to a new operating system. I would recommend if you have Huawei, it might be time to consider moving to a different hardware platform, seriously. As ride with Huawei is not going to be a fun ride.

 

Matt

We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us at this time every Wednesday. Craig, ordinarily I'd let you go. But I do have one question for you that I would like to get your perspective on if possible. On Drudge right now, the headline is about rare earth materials. This one isn't on your list of stuff. However, I know that you know that rare-earth materials make up most of our circuits and cell phones.  There's a lot of elements that are necessary for the production of smartphones, electronics in general, right. And virtually all of them come from China. It is not essential because there are places in America where we could do it. There's a, you know, a couple of great places in California, which would be fantastic if they allowed us to use them and we could and dig into the earth. But we don't do that, and we get them mostly from China. And now China due to the trade of dispute between the United States and China,  China is now threatening to slap either tariff or restrict our use rare-earth materials as leverage in the trade war against the United States. Since we're so dependent on it. So, thoughts on that? I mean, you have an entire country, addicted to technology and their smartphones and all these things. And you have a single country, which is a current trade adversary that controlling all of the elements necessary for the production of those things. It seems like a recipe for disaster. Don't you think?

 

Craig

It sounds like it. The last numbers, I saw, show that China has been providing something like 97 percent.

 

Matt

Yep

 

Craig

Yeah of some of these rare earth materials that are used in the manufacturing these electronics. Here's how I've been looking at this because I have been following it. We've got, obviously a bit of a trade war going on. There been a lot of people for years who've been concerned about China, buying up some of these rare-earth plants around the world. We're not that worried in the electronics industry about it, because as you pointed out, we have our own,

 

Matt

Really?

 

Craig

Well, in the short term, there is going to be a hit, no question. But we have our own. Also, on top of that remember much of it, look at the uranium one deal, that uranium is coming from the United States. And ultimately, if we need to gain access to some of the rare-earth materials that are here in the US or, or are in the ground and mined by some of our partners worldwide, all we have to do is call China and say get lost. We don't care if you own it on paper, we are grabbing control of it. And that's what the talk in the industry is right now. That we will use eminent domain to grab back resources in our country and friendly countries to gain access to it because it is critical for both military and civilian use, like our cell phones and computers and the manufacturing of them. Also, there are alternative ways to do some of this manufacturing. And the big one. Number one is it it's so cheap to buy these rare-earth materials from China, we don't even bother recycling most of our gear. And much of the rarer stuff that we need can be recovered from existing electronics. So, that's another angle that we can use to protect ourselves.

 

Ken

Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins us every Wednesday 730. Craig will talk to you next Wednesday.

Craig

Hey, take care, gentlemen.

 

Matt  

Bye-bye. All right. Thanks a lot,

 

Craig

So, with that, hey, I am going to be making some changes to this podcast. And I hope they're going to be what you guys want to hear. It's going to be a little bit more security focused and a little less of the interviews because I've found that, you know, often I end up talking about the same essential topics on all three different radio stations. So, I'm at the very least,  think I'll do cut it up so that we have the best of the three on the individual topics. I haven't decided yet, and we might have me going through each of the issues individually and not even include a whole bunch from these different radio stations.

Anyways, as always let me know what you think text me@craigpeterson.com.

I've got to throw this out. My heart goes out to everybody in the Midwest and elsewhere. Tornadoes or other natural disasters have hit them. It's been quite a week, two weeks. I blame it on the Canadians. Okay, Canadians listening. Sorry about that. But anyhow, it is the cold air that's a problem. We have so much cold air that's hitting this warm, moist air that's come up from the Gulf from the south. And that is responsible for causing these storms this year, according to the meteorologists and that makes sense, right? That's what you need for a storm, a cold front hitting a warm front. And the fact that we have such cooling going none from some of this cold air coming from the north and hitting this hot and moist Southern air. It's creating a lot of tornadoes this year. So my heart and prayer go out to everybody impacted. Take care of everybody, and we will be back on Saturday. Bye-bye.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553


 

May 31, 2019

I am planning a Security Summer for my listeners.  I will have some free courses.  I will also introduce you to some of the software that I use for my clients and how you can use it too.  So watch out for announcements on those.

Is our society changing? What part is social media playing? Listen in today for more on this.

What can Open Source do for you? Why Open Source may change your life. More on this today.

Are we really ready for Autonomous Cars? or Is the technology expected to perform faster than it is actually ready?  Interesting questions we will be discussing today.

What is going on with Google?  G-Suite and Titan are both having issues.

Microsoft has another problem and it is a big one. More on this.

Do you have a Mortgage?  You need to hear this!

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript: 

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 06/01/2019

Cyberbullying, Security summer free courses, First American Hack, Google Bluetooth titan hijacking

----

Hello, everybody, Craig Peterson here. We have ignition and boy do we have a show for today and then some.

You know a little bit about cyberbullying, I am sure.

Well, I'm going to tell you about something that I experienced this weekend, something that your kids may be experiencing in a much more critical way.

You know, we mentioned last week about the suicides and tied into this Netflix show. Well, we'll get into this a little bit more.

For those of you who are wondering how software is getting developed, nowadays and what you might want to do for your business for software development. We'll talk a little bit about GitHub and this whole open source revolution and how It has come into the mainstream, now.

We have some security warnings from our friends at Google. A massive hack. I don't think I saw this anywhere. Frankly, we'll talk about what Krebs on security had to say about this.

Tesla. Got to throw this in because what's a week without talking about Elon Musk. Consumer Reports is calling the automatic lane change feature on Tesla's navigate on autopilot, far less competent than a human driver. So, it kind of makes you wonder, should we be messing with this? Is this the right thing to do? Frankly, I think it's an excellent question.

Well, I commented last weekend in one of the articles up on the website, and as you know, I post articles every week. It's usually just a real quick synopsis of like the first couple of sentences from the article, and then I'll give you a link to it.

However, this last week, really, for the first time in a couple of years, we sat down and wrote some articles. We had mentioned something because again, I select the pieces that I am going to cover.  I go through what the strategy is with my team and talk about the salient and essential points, and then they go off and write the article. So, this particular one was about anonymous, and it's still up on the website. And we take those articles, and we tweet them, we put them up on the social media sites as well.  Well, the guy that we had mentioned in the web article claimed to be part of the hacking group Anonymous. He spent time in prison because of some of his activities, and he was a little miffed with me.

So I got a little bit of a whiff of him not being pleased about me and what I said in that article. I thought that it was rather interesting because this is the first real hater I've had in quite a while, frankly.  Well, I've got to tell you, this feeling I had in my gut was, you know, people describe this, this feeling of butterflies and things and here, I was wondering, what did I do? What did I do to hurt this guy's feelings? Or, what, right.  I can only describe it as a Wow thing. Well, in reading a little bit further into what he had said was that the that he remembers, I think it was in his warrant, it mentioned the FBI infragard program. And I'm an infragard member. He probably looked me up, and I'm easy to find after seeing the article, which was perhaps triggered by a Google search or maybe a Twitter search or something. And that made me feel a little bit better.

But man, brought back all the feelings of the first time there was an attack on my systems.  And that was again, you might remember in the early 90s. And I had these questions running through my mind, what should I do? How do I do it? How do I respond? What? What's going on? I remember when I discovered the hack, who do I call, right? What do I do? And what's going to happen, Right? In my case, it's what's going to happen to everything that I have built, right? Here I am sitting there with a company that I had founded years before, and remember it's the early 90s and I was still a relatively young guy. But I'd been working on this company for over a decade by that point in time. And that feeling I had could only be described as horrendous.

It was quite something, and it reminded me of this by having this guy from anonymous, you know, going after me kind of the cyberbullying thing, right? Hey, they're not sitting there trying to wait around for any logic or reasoning or anything else. It is a type what you feel without thinking reaction.

Think about people that you've had to deal with probably yourself before. So what do you do? Well, that made me do a little bit of re-evaluation, you guys know, if you listen to the show, for a long time that I do a lot of training, I offer a lot of free training for people on cybersecurity. And just thinking back again, made me remember helped me and let me just put it that in perspective.

Remember, that feeling I had in my gut when my first hack attack occurred.  When I realized someone had violated my trust, someone had broken in. Someone was potentially going to take my entire business away from me. How helpless I felt, and I had no idea what to do. Questions like: What should I do?, How can I do it?,  Who do I call?, What's going to happen to my business?, What's going to happen with my clients?. Of course, that was almost 30 years ago now. But this brought all those feelings back.

So here's what I'm going to do for everybody out there. Because I know I'm not alone. Some of you are maybe 30-40 years behind me on this journey. I admit I was a pioneer out there. I got arrows in my back, right? I was out there on the Internet early, getting people online, when it was first legal to do so. I was one of the very first people.

You weren't, Okay, I understand. You were running a business, and maybe you were not even born yet, okay. But I am committing now to build what I'm calling a security summer. And the idea is that throughout the summer, and I'm probably not going to be able to start this until late June, early July. But throughout the summer, I'm going to offer a course. So you know you know what to do, and you'll know how to protect yourself, right?

Because you have to start at the beginning, before the bad guys get in, how to detect it, once they are in what to do about it, the forensic analysis that you're going to have to do after the fact, to clean this thing up, right?

I don't want you to have that feeling in your gut that I had before. Thirty years ago, when my first hack happened. I've had a couple of times since and not nearly as dramatic, okay. Because I had dealt with it before and I knew what to do. I had moved into a position where I was pretty much at the forefront at the time in security. But then I went on to run my business.

But I don't want you to have that feeling your gut. Right? What do you do? I am sure some of you have had it before. I know you've come into the office in the morning, the computers aren't working. And your first reaction is there in your gut.  Your first thought is -- Oh my gosh, what do I do now? Then that turns into anger. It's anger towards your vendors. Right?

Well, I have Norton. I bought that Sonic wall. How did this happen? I should be all set, right. And so now you get on the phone, and you start yelling at vendors, you start yelling at your people who are supposed to be taking care of the IT side. I don't want you to feel that way.

We're going to have some free pieces of training this summer. If you're interested, send me an email, and let me know what security subject you're particularly interested in having me cover. That I can make sure we have some free training for you on that during the summer. I want to make it a summer of security. It's our security summer. Brought to you by Craig Peterson, my team and I am getting to work on it, as we speak.

My wife is going to put her heart and soul into this effort.  I think I know what you need, and I think I know what you want, but it is essential to hear from you so that I can give you what you feel you need.

So, email me at Craigpeterson.com Craig Peterson. com.

We're also going to be talking about it on this radio show on these podcasts and on YouTube side, etc., etc.

I got my first real hater this week in a long time. And it brought back memories and made me more determined to help you guys out.

So, What was one of the first things I did.  I shut down my website and made sure everything was patched up, right? Because I didn't want him to try and hack into my site. After all, anonymous is a hacktivist group, and that's what they do.

So, that's what I'm going to do for you guys. We're going to have a security summer this year.

Okay, so let's get into a couple more of these articles before I run out of time.

This one, I thought it was just totally appropriate. I got a couple of articles that are appropriate for this week, and you'll see those up on my website, and one or two of these articles were written up with my team.  My wife does a lot of this stuff too. So, kudos to her.

You will find these up on craigpeterson.com, This is from an article that initially appeared in Pro Publica, and I found it on Ars Technica myself.  It is a fascinating article and written by a couple of people here, Renee Dudley and Jeff Cow.

It's talking about the some of these companies here in the US that you can hire to help you out of ransomware, tight spot. Think about some of these we have read about, lately, The city of Atlanta, Georgia,  Newark, New Jersey, the Port of San Diego, Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in LA. Atlanta, online water service requests and billing systems were down for over a month. Colorado Department of Transportation, they called in the National Guard, all because of cyber attacks. Apparently what has happened here is that the companies and in these cases, government institutions and hospitals, went to professionals and said, hey, what should we do now? The response from the FBI from the government, in general, is don't pay ransoms.

Well, guess what happened here? The FBI said that the criminal actors were out of the reach of US law enforcement. But they were not apparently and out of the reach of this American company called Proven Data Recovery out of Elmsford, New York. It appears that these guys regularly made ransom payments to Sam Sam ransomware hackers over more than a year, according to Jonathan Storfer, who is a former employee who dealt with these ransom payments.

Now, Bitcoin transactions are somewhat anonymous and difficult to track. But I know in talking with some secret service agents that they have tracked people through public records and got convictions because of being able to track down some of these Bitcoin coin payments. Pro Publica was able to trace four of these payments, and this article goes on and on.

Another US company, Florida based company, Monster Cloud also professes to use their data recovery method, but turns out they were paying ransoms sometimes without informing law enforcement or the victims, this is bad.

Again, from Pro Publica, both of these companies charge their victim's substantial fees on top of the ransom amount, and they offer other services such as sealing breaches to protect against future attacks.

Well, that's what I do for a living, Right? I don't try and do the recovery and no do I pay any ransom. There are many pieces of free recovery software out there that work in most cases. But, sometimes if you don't have a good backup, you're just out of luck. So, keep that in mind. Going to one of these companies, if you have ransomware on your computer is not going to solve the problem of ransomware. Because, some of these account companies, at least two of them in this case, according to Pro Publica, are making deals with the ransomware criminals, which is, in my opinion, not right.

So, we talked a couple of weeks ago about our friends over at Equifax and how they took a huge hit here. It cost them over a billion dollars, probably I would guess close to one and a half billion, but I don't know for sure. They haven't disclosed all of the numbers. This week, they did reveal that they had to do a bit of a write off of about a little more than half a billion dollars. But there's another one out there, and It is crazy.

It is the one, I mentioned, from Krebs on security, concerning the website for First American Financial Corp, a Fortune 500 real estate, title insurance giant.  I mean giant, billions of dollars in annual revenue. First, America Corp leaked hundreds of millions of documents related to mortgages going back to 2003. Krebs on security found this leak, and they went ahead, and they fixed it.  Isn't that nice of them, after the horses got out of the barn. So, these are digitized records that included bank account numbers, bank statements, mortgage statements, tax records, social security numbers, wire transaction receipts, driver's license images, were all available without authentication to anyone with a web browser. I find that incredibly unbelievable that a company that employs 18,000 people, you'd think they'd have some security people on staff. And they brought in more than 5.7 billion. There you go. That's the number from Krebs article. Now Krebs found out a bit about it because of a real estate developer, out in Washington state, who said he'd had little luck getting a response from them.

It just goes on and on, just like last week with what happened with Intel. And the reports of their colossal security problem. And they, it sounds like, literally tried to buy off the people who reported this massive bug in the Intel chips. It's just amazing. So it goes on and on the earliest document number available on the site wasn't document number 75. The dates and documents get closer to real-time each forward increment in the record number. I have the article up on my website, we've got a link to it if you want to see it.  It's it is just stunning. So, who knows what happened has happened here, again, we have an example of a company that did not keep track of the security problems. And what do you want to bet they did not keep track of data x filtration, and what the criminals stole? Big deal. Big problem.

Now Google's got a couple of warnings out this week too. Is this getting old to anybody? I hope you're learning from this, and I hope you can apply it in your own life and your businesses. Take time to learn from these things. But, Google exposed that their G Suite, which is the Google suite where you as a business, you can pay for Google Docs, Google Sheets, etc. If you're a business and you're trying to use it, they want you to pay for it. That's what the city of Atlanta found out when they got hacked. All of their email accounts were down, and they couldn't do spreadsheets, they couldn't do anything.

So, they all signed up for Gsuite accounts. Google promptly shut them down two weeks ago for doing that, because they're supposed to pay. Then Google worked out a deal with them. However, it turns out they were storing plain text passwords on its servers for the last 14 years. It is a very, very big deal. So Google is saying that they have fixed the issue and that they've seen no other improper access or misuse of the affected passwords. They've got reasons why they did it. No, everybody makes mistakes in security, okay. I'm giving you that. But these two cases are for companies that should know better, they have big enough department, and they are going to lawsuits.

And like Equifax, it's probably going to cost our friends over at First American Financial Corp over a billion dollars. It is something that they can maybe afford to pay a billion dollars in fines and fees.

But how about you as a small business. So we've talked about two-factor authentication many times on my show. And we always set up two-factor authentication when it comes to our clients to keep their data safe. You know, some of them have to have to fall under the rules that are in place for federal military contractors, federal contractors, HIPAA records, etc., etc. So you have to have the right kind of two-factor authentication in place, you have to have the correct type of training, the right kind of databases, etc.

And the people are getting ripped off right, left and center, these companies that are selling some of these things, they don't care. They are just trying to sell you something another point product and other point security, that is not going to help you out. Can you tell I am getting a little pissed today? Excuse, My French.

But here's what's happening. Google has something they call Titan, and we've talked about it on the show before. It is a security key.  It was leading edge, and I'm glad they did it. They've been using it internally for all of their logons. So, it's something you have along with something, you know.

Now, you know. I have been promoting Yubikeys. I don't have an investment in any of these companies. We do use them when we are trying to get a company secured. The idea behind the Yubikey and Titan security keys is that it's a little USB fob, you plug it into your computer, you type in your password, you're off and running. Okay?

Well, Google's warning that for the Bluetooth Low Energy version of the Titan security keys it sells for two-factor authentication are vulnerable to hijacking by nearby attackers. Google says if you have them, contact them. And they'll give you a free replacement device that fixes the vulnerability. It has to do with Bluetooth pairing protocols, and that means that anybody within 30 feet can carry out an attack, against you. These are $50, which is about the same cost as a Yubikey. I, personally, would go with the Yubikey. But there now you know about the Google Titan. There is nothing particularly wrong with it, except that it's one version is susceptible to hack. If you check the back of your Titan key, if you pull it out right now, it's probably on your key ring, it's a nice, small thing looks like your USB thumb drive, almost. If it starts with a T1 or T2, it is susceptible to attack and eligible for a free replacement.

We're not going to have time to get into the rest of these things. So let's get into cyberbullying. I think this is an important one. And I want to talk about internet mobs because that's kind of what happened this week to me. And because I was reported on some security stuff, right, and they, they use almost anything they can against you.

And recently we've seen real problems with cyberbullying against kids. According to a survey and a completed study,  It reported online bullying affected 43% of kids. One in four has said that happened more than once. 70% of students reported seeing frequent bullying online. Over 80% of teens use a cell phone regularly. I think these numbers are probably higher than what this study showed, in 2014, I bet you they come close to 100%.

Now, most of the teens ignore it. You know I talked about that terrible Netflix show "13 Reasons Why" where a teenage girl committed suicide and left behind 13 cassette tapes explaining her 13 reasons for killing herself. It has led to a 30% increase in teen suicides in the 30 days after that show came out. So there, there's been a correlation drawn on that it did not, by the way, affect adults, it was mainly the 10 to 18-year-olds that it touched. But, we have kids that are thinking about suicide and committing suicide because of cyberbullying. There have been well-publicized criminal cases about this.

Now, how about an internet mob? How about if one of these groups decides to come after you, and the group is just the cheerleaders at school? There's a great story that CNN shared this week about a young lady, named Dominique Mora. She's from Southern California and went to school in St. Paul, Minnesota. She is 23 years old and was attending on a softball scholarship. So she thought it would be great to take a job at Chipotle to help make ends meet. Well, she was working at the store, and a group of teenagers came in ordered food, went to pay for it, and their debit card didn't work. That group of teenagers ran out of the restaurant with the food. They stole it, right. The manager gave them a little coaching and told them here's what they should do. What happened next was another day a group of teenagers came in, and she recognized two of them as being part of the group who had ordered food with the bad debit card before running off with the food. They never paid for it. They called the police and explained that these two teenagers were there and they did not want to serve them. We want them evicted from our store.  Here is this young woman, 23 years old, and she asked them to pay first. They pulled up a cell phone, and she didn't realize they were videotaping her and started accusing her of racism because she was a white person caught in the act of doing something labeled racist. Which obviously, there's no racism involved in this at all, they had stolen food from this store, and it was on video, there's surveillance video, it had these two guys on it, according to what CNN is reporting. They dumped this video of her as a racist "B" online. The video of her November confrontation was watched at least 7 million times retweeted at least 30,000 times within two days, and media covered it. Chipotle fired her after it went viral. Now here she is, having done nothing wrong, the police not responding in a reasonable amount of time. It sounds like they never really did respond. It is a case of confirmation bias, these black guys were calling her a racist and the video they presented made it look like she may have been. It is now being used to paint her falsely as a racist. She lost her job and now is worried about what will happen, what she could or should do, and what she should not do.  Those are the same questions I opened the show with today that went through my mind 30 years ago and ran through my mind again this week.

Very, very, big deal.  I think w have got to spend some time with our kids talking about this.  Helping them understand the whole act of bullying, what cyberbullying is. That they should report it to the authorities at school, report it to your teacher, report it to the principal, I guess the vice principal is the one who's usually dealing with these types of things. The most common places where it's happening, and this is from stopbullying.gov, they have a lot of great information. Social media like Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, SMS, you know, your text messages, instant messaging, which includes email provider, app services, social media, and of course, email at self. We've got to be careful because the content that we share online, you can get these internet mobs, this mob mentality where everyone jumps on board and starts attacking people. It can drive not just our teens, but almost anyone to suicide, and we don't want that to happen. Sit and talk with them. You know, I was severely bullied as a kid as well. But you know, I could leave it alone. It was happening on the way to school, at school, on the way back from school. At least there were brackets or definitions surrounding it. But nowadays, there aren't.

All right, I want to send you to my website Craigpeterson.com, because you will find more information about all of these topics today.

A very, interesting one on hackers. About anonymity that was once critical and how that's now changing. I might try and get into that next week. A little bit more here on the show.

Also, the Consumer Reports thing about Tesla. Don't count on their autopilot people. Be very careful. The automatic lane change feature is reported to be far less competent than a human driver. So, don't use it.

Be concerned about cyberbullying.

I'm working here this summer. I'm going to make this a security summer. I'm going to be doing some free courses. We're going to help you guys out with lots of free information.

I give these little webinars. They're not I'm not trying to upsell you or anything else. I'm trying to inform you so make sure you attend. Let me know if you're interested and what topics you think I should cover.

So if you are interested,  email me. me@craigpeterson.com That is P-E-T-E-R-S-O-N Peterson with an O.

Until next week, everybody.

Take care.

Have a great week.

Bye-bye

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Related articles:

Our New Society: Social Media Results In Judgement By Mobs

Open Source Is Changing The Way We Approach Everything

Autonomous Cars — Are they ready for Prime Time?

Why Are We Still Trusting Google?

Running Windows? Be Sure You Patch!

You Need Two-Factor Authentication Even If Google Screwed It Up

Got a Mortgage? Your Information Might Be Included In Massive Hack

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May 29, 2019

Craig was on with Jim Polito. Today, they discussed the latest in Chinese offensive military weapons.  This new Chinese armored attack vehicle that can launch a swarm of autonomous drones. They also talked about the absolute need to install Parental Controls for some of these streaming and social media sites. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

Lack of Media Parental Controls Contributing to Suicides

Ready For An Autonomous Robot Army?

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 05/28/2019

Chinese Have A New Offensive Weapon and Why You Must Install Parental Controls.

Good morning, everybody. Hopefully, you had a happy Memorial Day. I certainly did. I spent it with friends and some family as well, business associates, you know how that all goes but having the freedom to be able to associate with the people you want and have a fantastic barbecue that came to us at a very high cost.

There are a lot of people out there who want to run our lives, control our lives.

And my gosh, have you watched the series Chernobyl, if you haven't seen Chernobyl on HBO, you should take the opportunity to view it.
Chernobyl shows some of the significant ultimate pitfalls of socialism, and what it does to us.

Here we have all of these people who are willing to put their lives on the line, even though there may be significant issues with why we are somewhere, why they think we shouldn't be there.

Just the fact that they are volunteering to do it, that they're stepping forward, and so many have lost their lives. My heart goes out to them and their families. And thank you, thank you, thank you.

You know, I came to this country, I'm an immigrant myself. And I am so glad I have the opportunity to be an American, to be a citizen of the United States and to be with so many like-minded people. I'm sure many of us disagree on things. I know. I've got people who vehemently disagree with me, Wow! There are trolls out there. Overall, I think we agree that we have a right to free speech, although so many on the left don't appreciate it. They want that to squash free speech. We still have it, and there's been an enormous price that paid to protect that right. Sorry, this was not meant to be a lecture.

Okay. I do want to go to our friend, Mr. Jim Polito. We had a great conversation this morning. So, right now, we'll go to Jim. Also, I'm going to be changing the format of these podcasts here a little bit in the weeks ahead. So, some might be a bit delayed. Some might be just changing dramatically. We'll see how it goes. Be sure to let me know what you think about this podcast and maybe some changes you'd like to see. Just me at craigpeterson.com. Here's Mr. Polito

Jim: Welcome to our good friend, and Tech Talk guru with, Wow, with a full plate today. Just like the cookout yesterday on Memorial Day. Here is Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir.

Craig: Hey, good morning. Yeah, I had a great Memorial Day yesterday, I was impressed with those gentlemen from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund. And the work that underway there. It's kind of a letdown to be on after them.

Jim: This Morning. You're all very, very important. No, no, that was good. That was a good lead-in for you. And speaking of Vietnam, I want to talk to you about this autonomous robot army. Now we've, we've discussed World War three and how it has already begun in cyberspace, but there's still conflict on the ground. And then my question to you is, is it going to be run by machines and drones?

Craig: Yeah, it kind of looks like it might be at least for the most part. Now. We've got China who has licensed from Russia, this, this thing, about the size of a Humvee, more or less, right. It's a small military vehicle. And what China has done with this vehicle is to combine this technology with the knowledge they gained from producing drones. Think of all the drones we have flying around our country. Did you know 80% of the drones that we buy, civilian drones, are made by one manufacturer in China. They've got this technology down, nowadays. But what is surprising is that China has been accused, even recently now, of sending GPS coordinates for these drones back to China.

Jim: Whoa. Right. They are using the products they sell us to spy on us.

Craig: Exactly. And in this case, to map this out, right. They can map where things are because the drones are taking pictures or video and equipped with GPS and cell capability. A beta test has been conducted to see what it might be sending, and it looks like GPS coordinates. It is all a fascinating, albeit troubling problem. What China has done now with this kind of Humvee type thing is they have installed launchers. And these launchers are designed to launch small military drones. Now, it makes sense to have a drone that was associated with let's say a Humvee, right, a small drone, you can launch, you can see what's around you may be on the battlefield, see if there's EDIS in the road up the head, all these things makes a lot of sense. It appears that this particular vehicle, which is being advertised online right now by the Chinese manufacturer, has been sold, by the way, to other countries. It is comes equipped with four of these drones that are for reconnaissance type drones. However, it also has eight other drones, known as killer drones. The idea with this platform is that they can go to any place that you want to and drop a very, small bomb with high explosives on it. We saw something like this happen in Venezuela late last year to the President of Venezuela. Yeah, the big, you know, burst in the air up front, was a from a drone, what do we do? Situations like this could be very, very, bad because think of a drone army coming after you. But let's put a bunch of pieces together.

Craig: China is number one in the world right now for facial recognition, which they are using to track all of their people, right? They're not citizens. I guess civilians would be a better term to call them right, in a socialist state. They are tracking these citizens and know if they jaywalk, they lose the social credit points, or other things happen, and it gets to the point where they can't even get on a train or fly anymore. If you're China who has these drones, and they are in a small vehicle like a Humvee. They can be used to go to any location. The next step is, if they're not there already, is to identify a face or a person and have them go after that person. Thank you. Yeah, the biggest scary thing is what you might call a drone cloud. So let's think about a hundred drones looking for one person.

Jim: Yeah. And so I mean, we see that stuff in the Terminator movies, and you know, the drone looking and getting a facial recognition scan, and then going after that person. I mean, that's science fiction. Not anymore.

Craig: Not anymore, and that's downright scary when you get right down to it. This armed tactical truck is loaded with what they call blowfish, autonomous drones, by the way. It's reminiscent of the Borg and, and Terminator, but it's here. So your question, what can we expect in the next world war? Well, we are sure to see nation-states and going after our infrastructure, our base technology, and instead of them sending out a whole bunch of troops onto the ground, all they have to do is send out some of these anonymous elements, drones, and they could take out almost anything. So now you know why the White House Secret Service and all these other people are so concerned about it. The FAA has gotten involved, with not only the licensing of drones, that happened before but in setting up drone routes and tracking them. These things have become very dangerous.

Jim: Wow, we're talking with Craig Peterson, our tech talk guru. And at the end of this segment, we're going to give you a number you're going to text my name, Jim. And you'll be able to pick up all of this information plus a lot of other stuff. And that's what I want to get to lack of parental media controls, is contributing to suicides. Tell me about this Craig

Craig: I hate this story. It's very, sad. And it goes back to a study that was just completed by the National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Amen, he's a doctor down in New York City. And he deals a lot with brain injury and helping people recover from it. If you know someone that has had brain injuries like the football players, right, the concussions and things take a look at and check out Amen Clinics online it is just phenomenal the treatments they are doing there.

Craig: What happened here now, and I found out from Dr. Amen about this. There is that there is a TV show on Netflix right now called "13 Reasons Why." Yeah, this is a story of a teenage girl who took her own life, left behind 13 audio cassettes for her friends to listen to, to unravel the reasons why she killed herself. That so there is a study that was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. And it appeared in the Journal of the American Academy of Child adolescent psychiatry and analyzed five years of suicide rates amongst people between the ages of 10 to 64. Now adults, basically over the age of 18, showed no significant change in the month after the show was released. However, the kids, from the ages of 10 to 18, showed a 30% increase in suicide, the month after that show was released. Okay. We've got to remember, and this even goes to giving kids iPads, iPhones and going on the internet, all of this stuff, young kids brains are still under construction, right? And our, you know, our brains develop until your mid-20s. Girls brains typically develop faster than boys, and we know that, right? But this is very, very, scary. Our physical brains aren't mature until the age of 25. One of my kids, who is I think he's 25. Forgive me, I have eight, so I'm not sure. I came down, and he was playing this video game. I have never seen such violence. It just it blew my mind. I don't even want to describe it on the air. I sat down and talked to him about it. Now for me, It was shocking, but to him, it was just a game. And there have been debates over the years as to whether these types of games are hurting kids or if they matter or don't matter. One thing I can see is desensitization. And now with this latest study about this movie, this video series, this TV show called "13 Reasons Why" it seems apparent that it is dramatically affecting the younger kids. And that goes back to what you started with, again, using parental controls, we have to turn them on because this show is not rated for kids to watch. And if we don't have these controls turned on this 30% bump in suicide rates can't is directly attributed to it. But my gosh, the correlation is very scary.

Jim: That is something that we can prevent. I mean, we can't prevent everything, and there are always kids may have other issues but you know, you can reduce the risk. There's a lot of great additional information that Craig has, and unfortunately, we don't have a lot of other time. So Craig for folks to get the this these stories and other things they need to text my name, Jim, to this number

Craig: 855-385-5553 that's 855-385-5553

Jim: Standard data and text rates apply folks Craig will not sell your name to somebody else, and he won't hack you. Craig that was a great segment. Thank you so much for your time.

Craig: Right. Take care, Jim. Bye-Bye.

Jim: Take care. Bye-bye. All right, we have a very important

---

Don't miss any episode from Craig. Visit http://CraigPeterson.com/itunes. Subscribe and give us a rating!

Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

More stories and tech updates at:

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For questions, call or text:

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May 25, 2019

There is a Rise in Teen Suicide, Listen in and I will explain the cause and what you can do to mitigate it.

Do you use your computer, tablet in the evenings?  A Study out of Amsterdam sheds new light on that subject.  Wait 'till I tell you how their solution. 

We have had it Huawei and China!  I will explain more in today's show. 

Intel, boy do they have problems and so do you.  Listen in to find out more.

Armed Drones and Trucks that can deliver swarms of them?  Which of our Enemies has created this technology? More on that today.

Graduating in 2019?  What you need to know about your first job out of school.

Has this group of Social Justice Warriors, seen its last days? 

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript: 

2019-05-25-rise_in_teen_suicide-1008-03-teen_suicide.mp3

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 05/25/2019

Why Is There A Rise In Teen Suicides, China's Terrifying Drone Platform, New Proven Benefits Of Blue Blockers

Hey, good morning, everybody,

Craig Peterson here. We have got a bunch to cover. Hang in there it is going to be very busy. Man, oh, man. Hey, if you haven't turned on the parental controls for Netflix, and you have any kids between the ages of 10 and 20, you might regret it. We will talk about why the suicide rates are up.

We got some serious problems this week, this whole zombie load flaw and what it is doing to our computers. Intel should be paying us. We need reparations.  Where are the lawsuits? How am I going to get my machine back?  So that is on the agenda to talk about today. It is true for you too. Okay. Huge, huge problems with a vulnerability called Zombie Load. 

You know about anonymous, you remember those guys, they were the Guy Fawkes masks.  It was pretty, evident that they did not understand what Guy Fawkes was about or what he was trying to do. He wasn't like some total off the wall socialist. But anyways, Anonymous is dead.  We are going to go over the stats and what they tried to do what they did do and a little bit about some of their accomplishments, if you want to call it that, I guess.

Mitigation here, awe man we will get into that just a couple of minutes here. 

Wake up call for college. We're going to cover this one. Entry level jobs. They are not what they used to be. You are expected to hit the ground running. We will talk about what that is all about and the statistics for our newest grads. 

I love this. I bought some glasses a few years ago that are blue blockers for my computer.  There is this new study that proves I was right. I will tell you why in a little while. Wow,

Man, this company has been in some trouble. President Trump, of course, put an executive order t about this Chinese manufacturer of handsets. If you have one of them, and you might because they are the second largest manufacturer of smartphones in the world.  I will tell you what's up. 

There were some changes here this last week as well on that front. And we'll start with this one China. 

Now, we know who China is, I don't know, I would call them an enemy. 

Frankly, you know, we buy a lot of stuff from them. Are they not even a frenemy?

I think they really are an enemy. 

The reason I think this is because they are stealing our intellectual property. 

They are forcing U.S. companies that want to manufacture in China to not only share their intellectual property but give them control over it.  I am sorry, but that is absolutely, crazy. 

And now we see they are using some of the stolen U.S. technology, as are the Russians.  The whole social media vote project is just shocking.  Now they have the technology thanks to us, and they stole from us to destroy our carriers. 

It was for our supersonic missiles. They got it from us. Thank you very much, Federal Government. It reminds me of the days when Bill Clinton, do you remember when he sold our missile secrets to China.  He gave them the ability to make ICBMs or intercontinental ballistic missiles. And he did it saying they we were going to have China launch missiles for us. Yeah, that worked out really, well, didn't it? 

So now they have the technology to send missiles our way. Thank you very much. 

Then we had another Clinton, right. Mrs. Clinton when she was Secretary of State.  What she did was give the Russian some of our top secret military technology. It's astounding. So, with China and Russia, we have got to be very, very careful. 

We are not that aggressive. We certainly have been aggressive at times in the past. We've sent in troops to countries. Obama had troops in I think it was 80 some odd countries. 

President Trump has pulled that back a little bit. But China, they're not our friend. Okay, so that's the bottom line. 

Let's look at this new truck. There's a picture up on my website at Craig peterson.com. It is a truck that is using technology built by China. Technology licensed from Russia. It's an armored war machine. 

Well, you say so what, Craig. You know, we have Humvees that, and obviously, the Chinese do know how to armor vehicle? 

Well, you know, it is not that unique, frankly. So I am not that worried about it. But here is the problem. This particular armored war machine that has just come out, and China has been bragging about this. The company that made it was bragging about it. Remember that the state controls all companies in China, it is a socialist country, Big time. Everybody, there is working for the military, the People's Liberation Army. So keep all of that in mind. But this company, anyways, revealed what it was. It's called a YJ2080. And it has 12 launch tubes. Now,  what is very interesting about these launch tubes is that four of them are being used to deploy reconnaissance drones. Now, we are looking at that too. 

Right now, our military is looking at making flying drones that will go along with our jet fighters and will act as a wingman.   But, let's say an enemy has a missile coming for our jet.  We can deploy one of these drones, and it will move into the way, and it will launch missiles and even lock on a tone.  It can do a whole bunch of stuff. We are looking forward to that, right. 

These are smaller reconnaissance drones that are not very big. They don't have to go fast. But they can go 110 miles an hour. So you get the reconnaissance drones up. Okay, that makes sense. We use reconnaissance drones, with our Humvees and with our buffaloes and other equipment out in the field, right? 

Well, that's four of the 12 of these tubes, launch tubes. The other eight are for explosive-laden drones. And the idea behind this vehicle, according to the manufacturer, is to eliminate targets beyond the traditional line of sight and kill from above with four-pound bombs. Now, if you have a bomb dropped on your head, you only need just something the size of a quarter to kill you. And these are four pound bombs very, very big for taking out individuals. It is absolutely, crazy here. 

I found this in a report from Popular Mechanics. 

It's been reported over in the U.K., as well. Not a lot of coverage here in the U.S., 

These drones are designed to have the armored vehicle act as its control center. It's about the size of a Humvee. And it can search for and destroy its targets.

They have also fitted these drones and the pilotless aircraft with AK47 rifles, of course, Those are the fully automatic, not the SKS's, which are the semi-automatic rifle. And they are already being exported to combat zones in the Middle East. Now think about that for a minute. We have been up against Russians over there. We have fought with Russians over there in the middle east recently in Syria. We have killed Russian operatives, mercenaries over in Syria. So are we going to come up against this? And think about the number one company here in the U.S. for drums. It's D.J., are you familiar with them, I have a got DJI little hand rig that holds my phone and allows me to stabilize shots. But DJI sells, I think, it's about 80% of the consumer drones here in the U.S. Where do they have them made?  In China. Remember, anything manufactured in China is under the supervision of the socialist military government over there.

So this is a bad case here we've got the technology that we've developed, and DJI is using.  Being made and moved up to the next step of putting rifles on them or four-pound bombs on them. They've got this thing called A.R. blowfish auto-drone that China's exporting internationally, right now. And it's been advertised as being capable of full autonomy up to targeted strikes. It can autonomously conduct complex combat missions, including fixed-point timing detection, and fixed range reconnaissance and targeted precision strikes. Now, remember, something like this will fit inside your check-in luggage? Yeah, check-in luggage at the airport, this is not big. I'm not saying that people are going to be able to get them onto airplanes coming to the U.S. Maybe they will maybe they won't. But if these things are small, and think about what happened in Venezuela, where there was a bomb that went off on a drone right by their President. 

Drones are dangerous, and they're getting very dangerous. When you have something like this, Well, how hard would it be to take out Ferdinand right? Think about the start of World War One. What happened there?

They are selling these internationally. How hard would it be to get one into the U.S. It could be a terrorist organization. Take out a few people. If you were to ask me, I think this is likely, frankly. 

So be very careful. This whole approach that we're seeing is really entirely consistent with the Chinese and the Chinese military circles. 

They don't want a big hot war, but they are not against just kind of going after us, right. 

The easy way.

All right, next up here. Let's begin by giving you some reasons why you should have parental controls turned on, particularly for your Netflix account. 

Now, we've talked for years about whether or not these video games, shoot 'em ups and all kinds of things are suitable for kids. Some of this really turns my stomach. One of my kids, who's in his 20's was playing this one video game, and I have to admit it was absolutely, horrific.  I could not believe it. They were torturing people. And it was a woman, and she was screaming, and when a woman screams it absolutely, just made all my skin crawl. I could not believe it. I told him that he should stop playing that. You know, he was completely desensitized to it. Oh, yeah, I'm just playing a game. 

Well, does that cause the kids to become desensitized to this type of violence? Does it cause them to go out and kill people? Well, yeah, I'm probably not right. 

Does it do other things to their minds?  Well, it's evident that it does desensitize them, or they wouldn't play these games. They wouldn't be able to play these games. There's no way.  I would never be able to play that video game. None whatsoever. 

So, we know it does something. What does it do? Man, we could go back and forth on that, like the psychologists and psychiatrists who look at it. Then there are the government investigators,  as though they can figure their way out of a  wet paper bag. 

But, anyway, here's a study that is really, going to change your mind about teenagers and what you should let them watch at least view. 

Now, this is from Dr. Aman. If you are not familiar with his work, he's out of New York City. He's just amazing. He does a lot of work on brain development and how to help with brain injuries. So, he's really into brains. 

He uses some special scanners, these pet scanners and things I don't know how detailed you guys want to get. But check him out online. I think you'd love him, just amenclinics.com,  A M E N clinics.com. 

He has a great article that I reposted up on my website CraigPeterson.com It's talking about the media and what tweens and teens are watching.  He's asking, does it affect their mood and their mental health? 

Well, I don't know if you've seen this Netflix show, I saw a little promo boy it is nothing I wanted to watch. Okay, bottom line. I guess that's not a surprise. I'm getting old, right? I don't care about some of this stuff anymore. 

However,  I really care about this! 

There's a critically acclaimed show that's on Netflix right now called "13. Reasons Why".  It is in its third season. Well, the month following the release of "13 Reasons Why" on Netflix, the suicide rate among Americans aged 10 to 17. jumped by almost 30%. 

Now you say okay, Craig how can you draw that conclusion?  Is it a correlation? I don't know, come on. Come on, Craig 

Well, this is absolutely, fascinating.  "13 Reasons Why" is a story of a teenage girl who took her own life, and left behind 13 audio cassettes for her friends that unravel the reasons why she killed herself. 

Now there's a study that was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, and it appeared in the Journal of the American Academy of Child adolescent psychiatry. This study analyzed five years of suicide rates among people between the ages of 10 to 64.

There were no changes in the suicide rates for adults in the month after the show's release. And you know, that kind of makes sense. I know, if I had a troubled teen, I might want to watch something like this series, to try and figure it out.  So, what are they thinking?  What are they doing? 

So, I can look for the signs and symptoms that might be present in my kids? Does that make sense to you? 

Now, bottom line, pretty simple? Well, although there was no change in the suicide rate for the adults, they found that the rate among those under eighteen rose dramatically. 

Now, this is something that kind of surprised me. But here's the next point. It rose most dramatically amongst boys. 

Remember these are some tips from Dr. Amen. Young brains are still under construction. Brains develop until your mid-20s with girls brains, typically developing faster than the boys.  The area of interest is the prefrontal cortex. It is this area that has to do with the decision-making and the future consequences of your decisions. That area of your brain is the last area to mature at about age 25. 

Some people say, guys, it's really, not done until they're 30. I've seen those opinions before. This area is involved with judgment, planning, forethought, and impulse control. So, you can understand why teens and especially male teens are more likely to make rash decisions. Look at car insurance and how much they charge. I'm boy has to pay a lot more until they're about 25 than a girl does. Well, suicide is a growing problem in our society. Looking at the stats, the overall rate of suicides increase by 33% in the last 20 years. It's the second leading cause of death amongst people ages 10 to 34. And teams today are more likely to have suicidal thoughts or suffer from depression than millennials were at the same age. So let's talk about what to do here. Listen, this is really, really, important. I put this up on my website, CraigPeterson.com. 

Number one, monitor their media consumption. We need to understand what our kids and teens are watching on T.V., what they're watching online, what they're participating in online, including social media because that can play a vital role in the development of their brains. 

So, set limits on what they can watch when they can view it use parental controls, by all means, talk to your kids about what they're watching. 

Number two, do not let adolescence smoke marijuana. There was a time when I wouldn't have had to say that at all because you know that the wackytabakki causes problems even in adult brains, mainly when consumed over a long term.  Research is showing now that using cannabis as an adolescent raises the risk of depression and increases your suicidal thoughts and suicide attempts when you become a young adult, so don't let them smoke marijuana. 

Make sure that they get good sleep at night. And man it's crazy how little sleep some of them get you might remember being that age. 

Protect their brain from head injuries and concussions. Right. If you've got a kid that plays soccer, do not let them hit the soccer balls with their heads. Think of your brain being, basically warm butter. That's about the right consistency inside a hard container with very sharp edges pointing inward. And that why I tell you,  you don't want them hitting the ball with their heads. 

Seek help for mental health issues right away. If they've got signs and symptoms of depression, anxiety, ADD/ADHD, it's critical to seek advice for those issues. 

So, if you have a teen that might have some of these symptoms, by all means, reach out to a doctor find out what you can do. 

And if you want to get more advanced health check out Dr. Amen's clinic down in New York City. He has brain scans, and he can look for physical damage, and then help you with a regimen that will compensate for that damage because once the brains damaged, it's damaged. Head blows add up. Brain injuries are cumulative. It's not as though they all heal themselves and go away. 

If you've had a concussion, you have a problem in your brain for the rest of your life. 

Hopefully, it's not a bad one. Okay.

Okay. All right, next up here, Oh my goodness, we've had various Intel vulnerabilities over the last year, and some of them have been pretty big ones, frankly. 

Right now, Intel is busy downplaying the latest vulnerability. And this vulnerability affects almost every computer that has an Intel CPU in it made since 2011. Unfortunately, it affects many Intel chips going back to 2007. 

Intel has come out with a patch. Microsoft has released a patch that uses the microcode. Apple released their patch.  All of the major vendors have released patches.   Although, initially, the Microsoft patches were terrible and caused blue screens death. Okay, so as is typical with Microsoft updates, don't do them right away. Wait and make sure that Microsoft didn't mess it up yet again. Ya know, I don't get it, those guys seem to mess it up more than their fair share.

Well if you can believe it, Microsoft had 19 critical patches in this months patch set for Windows. 19 Critical patches! 

So, what has happened here, I'm not going to get into all the details. It's pretty complicated. But security researchers are rating this as a 9.5 out of 10. 

Keep an eye out, if you are on my email list watch for an email from me telling you when Microsoft has a stabilized patch set available, and it is safe to do these updates. 

But make sure you do the update. 

Now, let's talk about what this updates going to do. 

I found a great tweet from a guy over on Twitter. His name's Quentin. 

"FYI, as a cloud provider, we lost about 25% of CPU performance, over the last 18 months due to different security issues on Intel CPU's limiting their capacity using microcode, etc., etc."

So here he is reporting a 25% reduction.   Apple is saying that they have seen as much as a 40% reduction in performance. That's using tests that included multi-threaded workloads, public benchmarks, etc. 

Wow! Now the actual results are going to vary based on the model configuration usage and other factors. So, Intel is advising people to turn off hyperthreading on their CPUs. 

Now, let's get real, where it does this matter? Where does it not matter? Well, you know, if you get hacked, it's going to matter to you. 

It might be a big deal if your business goes out of business, due to this vulnerability, called zombie load. 

However, if you're not going to do the right thing and turn off hyperthreading and apply the patches because you cannot afford a 20 to 40% slowdown on your computer. I understand, just a little.  It's like buying an i7 that performs like an i5. 

Okay, to give you an idea, you paid extra for an i7, for that higher end Intel CPU. However performance wise you now have an i5, and it's not even as good as the i5 was when it was first released. But you know, you paid extra. So there you go, right.  Let's downgrade all of these CPUs.

It bugs me.  Intel, by the way, isn't about to give you an upgrade. They're not. They're not going out there saying Oh, guys, sorry about that. Here we go. Here's a brand new CPU is fully compatible, plug it right in. And you will be fine.  No, no, no.

Intel is saying they will not issue anything sort of fix for any CPUs made between 2007 and 2011.  Four years worth of CPUs now.  It's not all of the CPUs is just some of them.  However, it's pretty much all since 2011. 

So thanks, Intel, now that I paid you extra for your latest and greatest chip to get as much as 40% reduction in performance because you could not get your CPU code right.  It's absolutely, crazy! 

Fortune has a great article on this. I will have it up on my website at CraigPeterson.com.  Intel is saying that this vulnerability is only 6.5 on a 10 point scale. Whereas, the security researchers are rating this as a 9.5. 

As I said, Intel's playing the game here.  They're downplaying the seriousness of it.  However, at the same time, they've offered to pay the security researchers more than they've ever paid anyone ever before. It appears to be a kind of a keep quiet type thing.  That is what it looks like is going on here. 

So what do you do? If the if you are a cloud service provider, and you have a mixed load, you have to turn off hyperthreading, you have to. If however, you have a desktop computer or desktop computers at your office, and you're using advanced malware protection, like what we use from Cisco, I'm not talking about the crap, you know, the semantic the Norton stuff, okay, that that doesn't count, okay, that will not protect you. But if you have AMP, and you have a properly configured, next-generation firewall that's monitoring all the data coming in and out. You're relatively safe. Okay, so I'm not telling you you're safe. I'm not saying you don't have to worry about it. I'm just telling you, you're relatively safe for those people who can't afford to get a significant cut in your performance. There you go. So, Intel is trying to get you to buy more machines.

Man, I do not have time to finish the rest of these.  You guys are going to have to visit me online at CraigPeterson.com. I'm going to post this audio up there for you. So, that you can, you can listen in. 

This whole thing about anonymous remember these activists with the Guy Fawkes masks, and man, this is a very, very big enormous deal. It's amazing. So I'm going to talk about anonymous activism, where it is? Where it started?

We've got a big wake up call for Grads, and I'm going to talk about that one as well, the class of 2019. 

Wearing Glasses, If you do use computers, this is a quick one. So we'll do it right now. Get the blue-blocking glasses, and they look a little bit yellow when you look at the lenses. I use blue blocker reading glasses for when I'm on a computer. 

There was a very cool study that came out of Amsterdam. We already knew blue light from screens is hugely disruptive to your circadian rhythm, to that clock in your body. Well, it turns out from this study, that if you wear the blue blockers, it has virtually the same impact on sleep as turning off the devices, entirely. So there you go. A little bit of good news for everybody, right there. 

If you have a Huawei phone, I'll talk about this on my website at Craig Peterson.com. And there we go. 

So anyhow, check me out Craig Peterson.com. I have a lot of great information there for everybody. 

We're doing more courses and more free master classes. So check it out Craig Peterson.com 

Have a great day. And we'll be back again next week. 

Take care, everybody, Bye-bye.

 

--- 

Related articles:

Intel Has A Problem and So Do You 

Colleges Graduates Are Up For Rude Awakening When They Show Up For That New Job

Hacktivism Is Breathing Its Last Breath

Lack of Media Parental Controls Contributing to Suicides

Ready For An Autonomous Robot Army?

The U.S. Has Had Enough of Huawei and China!

Use Your Electronic Devices and Still Get A Restful Sleep

--- 

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

Follow me on Twitter for the latest in tech at:

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

 

May 22, 2019

Craig is in the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. This morning, they talked about a lot of things. Craig discussed the benefits of intermittent fasting. They also talked about the Israeli bombing cyber hackers, Jeff Bezos getting into the business of freight services, and hospitals pushing device makers to improve security on medical devices.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Microsoft Warns Of A Monster Computer Bug, In A Week Of Them

Israel Bombed Cyber Hackers (That Is Historic, For Many Reasons)

Jeff Bezos Personally Dumps A Truckload Of Dirt On Fedex’s Future

Hospitals Push Device Makers To Improve Security Following Cyberattacks

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 05/22/2019

Intermittent Fasting - Microsoft Warning About Patches - Israel Responded To Hacking By Bombing

Craig Peterson  0:00
Good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here, welcome, welcome. Hey, if you watch me on YouTube, or maybe you attend some of my classes, or you're one of my insiders that I do coaching with, you might have noticed that I have lost a quite a bit of fat. I'm going to say, not necessarily weight, I have lost weight. I've lost a lot, 30, 40 pounds. But I've also put on some muscle. And you might be wondering why and how. I've had quite a few people asked me that are, you know, getting security coaching from me. Well, I am doing something called intermittent fasting as well as my wife. My kids have been doing it. It has been just amazing for general health. So this morning, I was on with Ken and Matt, I guess Ken had disappeared during this segment. But he had been talking about doing some intermittent fasting a little earlier in the morning. And I was so I got in and I explained what I will learned about intermittent fasting and diabetes and various types of diseases, including cancer. Some Nobel Prize material that had been presented to a Nobel laureate just a few years ago, a major breakthrough in science of medicine. So I talked about that this morning. And of course, we got into all of our weekly stuff as well, including a major warning out this week about Microsoft and doing some of the updates. You know, should you, shouldn't you while we talked about that this morning as well. So here we go. And of course, you'll find all of this at http://CraigPeterson.com.

Matt Gagnon 1:38
Again 7:38 on the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. It is time to talk to our friend Craig Peterson. He joins us at this time every every Wednesday, and this is no exception of course. Craig, How are you this morning?

Craig 1:53
Hey, I am doing great. You know, we got to talk about one of my favorite subjects you guys are talking about a little earlier today, too?

Matt 2:01
Yes. What is that subject, sir?

Craig 2:02
So my wife and I have been doing intermittent fasting for over a year now. And I've read seven books on the topic. I follow a doctor out of the University of Toronto really closely, Jason Fung and he's a doctor. He's been a kidney doctor for the all a very long time. And he was tired of all of his patients dying. And of basically one thing, right, the whole insulin problem, diabetes. And about three years ago, there was a Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded to a Japanese researcher who discovered and really documented something called autophagy. And autophagy is the process whereby your cells repair themselves, but your body only repairs itself at one time. And that's when your fasting. So for instance, Matt, you know that you your mom probably told you time and time again, you got to get your sleep, right, give your body a chance to rest and repair. What are you not doing when you're sleeping? You're not eating? Right? And so it was really interesting to me, it started to click and so I read at least a half a dozen books on the topic and looked into the research, read some of the Nobel laureates writings on autophagy and follow Jason Fung who has been able to cure 1200 of his patients have diabetes, including the most severe types of diabetes. Now you got to be careful if you're diabetic, and you're thinking about fasting, intermittent fasting. Make sure you talk to your doctor. But with autophagy basically fixes almost everything. And then a side effect of it all is that you end up losing weight as well, and my wife and I, we've combined lost over 100 pounds over the last year, we are feeling better than I'm feeling better than I can remember in decades now. She is too, but it's absolutely amazing. So from a guy, you know, 10 years I was a volunteer paramedic, so I don't play a doctor on the radio. But I've read a lot about this, it's been very fascinating to me. And once you're trying to do is two things typically Ken. One is you want the results of autophagy, there's a study that just came out of Cambridge, about a month ago by a researcher saying basically, if you fast seven days a year, you it's almost impossible for you to get any type of cancer, because the autophagy clears those cells out of your body there. It's fascinating. You should research it. But taking your vitamins, it's still recommended to do that. Absolutely. But if you're eating less than about 500 calories a day, which you would be if all you took was your vitamins, you're on what's called a fasting mimicking diet. Now you got to be careful about restricting your calories because a calorie restricted diet causes other problems with your body and doesn't actually help with the fasting or the autophagy. What you're trying to do, bottom line here is stop the insulin reaction in your body. You want to slow that down. So eating anything like eating six meals a day, according to everything I've been reading and including what Dr. Fung has been talking about six meals a day is almost the worst thing you could possibly do. So don't snack. When you start out. Well, what we did for months with something called a 16. Eight fast, so we fasted for 16 hours a day. So if you finish your dinner at 6pm, 6am, the next day, there you got 12 hours with no snacks at all, you just drink water basically, or black coffee or tea, and then you don't eat until noon. So basically skip breakfast, you now have fasted for 16 hours and your body has had a chance to repair itself. It's fascinating stuff. After 24 hours of fasting, again, no food, no snacks, just some water and you know clear stuff, no sugars at all. After 24 hours, most of your immune system gets replaced. Your T cells, these white blood cells that protect you if they get rebuilt and replaced. And it's just fascinating, fascinating stuff. I read a bunch of scientific papers on this, as well as a whole bunch of books and studied some diets and things. Ken I absolutely love it. It is the easiest thing we have ever done from any sort of a diet. We've done, you know, bunches of them in the past, and they've all had various results for us. But this intermittent fasting thing has been amazing for us.

Matt 6:59
Well, this is the health hour with Craig Peterson. And he's talking with us here talking about all things technology and health related. So let's actually turn our attention a little bit to the technology side of things, if you don't mind. So Microsoft is warning us that there is a gigantic monster evil, malevolent force out there, a computer bug, and we should pay attention to that. So tell us a little bit more about what this warning is.

Craig 7:22
Yeah, I sent out another warning yesterday too, that was a Microsoft based one. But here's what happened. Intel, our friends member we have Intel processors CPUs in most of our computers. That's not true of your Samsung phone,Matt. It's not true of your iOS devices there Ken. But Intel processors, it's been found have another extremely major security vulnerability, I hate to have to say that again. And in order to completely block that computer vulnerability, you have to turn off something called hyperthreading, and that causes a 40% performance penalty. So we've got Apple's, Cook is very very, very upset with Intel right now, it's going to cause some more tensions between the two companies. Microsoft released patches for this, as has Apple, all the major manufacturers have released patches for this Intel bug. You will notice your machine will slow down afterwards. But I've got to warn you because Microsoft had 19 severe rated patches that they released this week. You know the Patch Tuesday thing. Be very careful because it breaks machines that are running so folks antivirus as well as some other software out there. So if you have not applied the Microsoft patches from this month's set of patches, don't do them. My Microsoft is calling them a monster computer bug. This is very big. And the likelihood that you're going to get nailed by it right now is kind of low. So be careful, Microsoft issued a warning that they are causing what's called the blue screen of death on Windows computers. So this is one time, you probably don't want to apply the patches quite yet. But you're definitely going to want to apply them.

Matt 9:21
We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us on Wednesdays at this time to go over what's happening in the world of technology. And Craig, Equifax got a data breach of course and a lot of their customers information was was taken and there's some huge data breach there whatnot. Apparently that has cost them dearly. Cash wise, what happened?

Craig 9:41
Yeah, this is I was just bemoaning Equifax because look at the insane ruined 145 million people's private data, you know, it got released, and some of it was extreme private data. And it was due to the fact that they didn't patch right, they had a six months old patching problem. And really no heads rolled over this. And that kind of upset me too. They just weren't doing anything right. But now we found out because Equifax just had their earnings report last week, we found out that they have they've spent they said more than $1.4 billion because of the breach and that's paying people, covering people for having their credit monitored, etc. And by the way, that does not include the money they keep they paid to Ken and his cohorts. So the 1.4 billion does not include legal fees. So I don't know if I should consider that any form of justice. But yeah, Equifax has paid and paid I would say $1.4 billion, and plus legal fees. This is probably they paid kind of dearly for this. I hope they have changed their practices. You know what people, this reminds us get back to the brass tacks. When it comes to security. get right down to it, make sure you are doing the patches, just wait this month for maybe another week or so for Microsoft to get its act together. But make sure you patch make sure you have the 321 backup stuff in place. Make sure you are taking care of the fundamentals. 

Matt 11:25
And Craig speaking of justice, you mentioned the word justice. One of the little tidbits that caught my attention was this. This, this news item about Israel actually bombing cyber hackers or cyber, I don't know if you want to call them cyber terrorists, whatever. So this is a this is sort of a this is a new front on on, I guess the the general idea of welfare, warfare, excuse me. And it's it's historic and different, new and a lot of ways. So describe this to us.

Craig 11:59
Well, it is it. We know already the IDF, the Israeli Defense Forces, they return fire when Hamas sends rockets over the border and stuff. And apparently, Hamas has been very aggressive against Israeli targets on the cyber security front. So they apparently track down where these Hamas cyber operatives are working out of. And it was a group called HamasCyberHQ.exe is what they call themselves. And the IDF came out with with a statement on Twitter that said, following our successful cyber defensive operation, we targeted a building where Hamas cyber operatives work. HamasCyberHQ.exe has been removed. And in Twitter they posted a picture of a U shaped building with the right side of it colored in red. And that apparently was a section that is now wiped off the map. So kinetic conflicts is what it's been called, which I thought was really kind of cool. But yeah, apparently Israel has decided that cyber warfare, it should be treated the same as any other type of warfare. And they took them out with good old fashioned explosives.

Matt 13:20
And speaking of taking out that's a good segue or not, but Jeff Bezos is undercutting and taking the knees out of FedEx. He's going going after them directly. What's happening there?

Craig 13:35
Did you see this pictures?

Matt 13:36 
I did.

Craig 13:37 
Bezos on this big John Deere right, front end loader. And yes, this is really fascinating, because of course, Amazon keeps trying to cut costs. We've talked about that before. And one of the things that they are doing right now just last week, outside of Cincinnati down in Kentucky, because they're right on the border, he's building a 3 million square foot parking garage, he's building his own airport, they're going to call it the Prime Air airport. It hasn't a parking garage for 100 cargo jets. Amazon doesn't own anywhere near that many right now. And he is launching his own freight delivery service. extensively, we're assuming here to be able to move Amazon products around the country. He's putting that one and a half billion dollars into this and saying this is going to create about 2000 new jobs. But as you pointed out, FedEx and UPS have been hauling this stuff for him. So I don't know, maybe it's rubbing a little salt into their wounds, because this is going to hurt their businesses.

Matt 14:45
Indeed, it is. Craig we have maybe a minute and a half left here. So a quick question here to wrap up here, hospitals, device makers and proving security following cyber attack. So you hear hospitals and cyber attacks and gonna freak me out a little bit like health records and everything else like what's actually happening here in a couple of minutes?

Craig 15:03
Yeah, well, we know health records are especially two years ago, it was the year of the medical cyber hack. Right now what we're seeing is US hospitals very concerned because there was a test done on CT machines and others in the hospitals. And it found that they were very vulnerable to hackers. And that's extremely concerning. Think about what might happen, if you have a had a radiological machine, an x-ray machine that was compromised, and they compromised them throughout the country. And now they're holding people's lives, literally at ransom, because they're saying, Hey, we will overdose people on x-rays. It's a terrible thought. And hospitals are now pushing back to device makers saying we want to know everything about those devices. We're buying, what operating system is inside of them, and go further along the lines. And we've seen that before too even in manufacturing facilities. Some of these devices even are still running Windows XP. These are not just a black box. It's not just sitting there doing nothing, right? It has a computer in it, everybody. We've got to protect it. And so hospitals are really pushing the device makers now. 

Matt 16:18
Yeah indeed. All right. Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins us at this time every Wednesday to go over what's happening in the world of technology. As always Craig, we appreciate it and talk to you again next Wednesday, sir.

Craig 16:29
Take care. Bye. Bye.

Matt 16:31
Thanks a lot, Craig. Alright, so we're gonna take a quick break here.

Craig 16:33
Hey, if you're interested in having me, I was thinking maybe do a little quick masterclass on this whole fasting thing. Maybe put a little support group together because I know it can be tough. I don't know. Let me know if you think I should or if you have any other questions, just me@CraigPeterson.com. And you know if you're interested, look it up. Study it a little bit. This is free, right? Who's going to pay for TV ads to do something for free, right? Nobody. This stuff just works. I'm just fascinated, amazed by it. Amazed how good it is, how good it's been for me, and how good it's been for thousands of other people that I'm aware of. I don't know what the ultimate number is. Anyways, Take care everybody. We will be back on Saturday. Bye bye.

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