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Now displaying: Category: technology
Mar 23, 2019

That last tweet or facebook picture may raise your insurance rates? We will explore why?

Extortion and the Internet. Now even normal people are the targets of these tactics?  Unpacking the trend in Virtual Kidnapping.

Whose watching us? Why? Yes, it is time to talk more deeply about Surveillance.

For all this and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment; it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/23/2019

Using Social Media Posts For Insurance Rates - Virtual Kidnapping - The Surveillance State

Craig Peterson 0:00  
This has kind of become my theme music, hasn't it? Over the last couple of months.

Craig 0:09
I like it. I've been using it all of my training videos and just all over the place.

Craig 0:13
And it's nice because I have the rights to use it, right? I don't have to worry about getting banned on YouTube or some other place because I'm using music I don't own right? Copyrighted stuff. But it's crazy when people do that. And just, I guess just don't know. Well, we have a bunch to talk about today. 

Craig 0:34
Also, I don't know if you caught it this week. But make sure you catch my podcast at http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. But I talked about two business problems. This week, we got a huge aluminum manufacturing giant over in Norway. It's not just basic manufacturer, I mean, these guys are huge. It's called Norsk Hydro, they also provide power and other things, had to shut down because they were nailed with ransomware. So I went through what happened there, what the whole thing was about some pros and cons, some things that we as business people can kind of keep an eye out for. 

Craig 1:13
And then I also talked a little bit about this, Michael, in fact, quite a bit about this Michael Cohen investigation and triggerfish, and what that is all about? And yeah, I thought that they had pretty much stopped using triggerfish and some of these other technologies. But as it turns out, no, that is not the case. So, that's what I talked about this week. It's a Security Thing. And right now, of course, we are live on the radio. And we're going to talk about a half a dozen other things that we just never managed to have quite enough time to get to, right. We're going to be talking about HR departments and the problem we have right now, with the huge high employment rate, how some of them are turning to artificial intelligence and how you might too. The guy who founded WhatsApp has a warning for us about Facebook, and I don't know this guy, come on, you made your money you got out and now you're upset. Bizarre malware is disabling some safety systems that industrial plants. And it's an interesting, quote, ethical line, unquote, for hackers, because historically, they have avoided things that would cause problems with public safety. But now they are no longer doing that. I talked a bit about that as well. This week, it's a security thing. On my podcast again, http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes, a massive database leak. And we know we're seeing these almost every week but this one's more interesting, because it turns out, it's surveillance on Chinese citizens by China. So what are they doing over there in China's digital surveillance state and what's coming here because these companies that are providing them with the tech are based in the US? And life insurers can now use social media posts to determine your premiums. That's an interesting one.

Craig 3:17 
And we will start up with two virtual kidnapping scams that occurred within 24 hours this week over in Laguna Beach. And it's something that I have a bit of a personal tie to, not in Laguna Beach, but these virtual kidnapping scams. One of the ladies that work with me, her friend had one of these happened to her. In fact, I think she got called out, this lady that works with me. And man, Maria, the thing that happened. It was just absolutely amazing. This is an article from the Orange County Register on California, it's up on my website, http://CraigPeterson.com. Two virtual kidnap cases within 24 hours, have led please to alert all local schools. Both these incidents were similar phone calls who were made to potential victims, with the color demanding a large sum of money or threatening to harm a loved one. Quote, we definitely believe these incidents are connected and said Sergeant Jim Kota, who last summer spearheaded assistance for Laguna mother who sought help after receiving a threatening call. They are happening and surrounding cities and all appear to be connected to the same group. All of them want money transferred to an account in Mexico. And they are directing victims outside of the city to withdraw money. It's like they've been there before. They're sending them all to Costa Mesa to make this payment.

Craig 4:53
So they had a report on March 7, and the victim here of this scam had already paid $5,000. And the article goes into some detail. But the here's the bottom line on it.

Craig 5:11
The FBI got involved about a week ago. And of course, they investigate the scams, and they work with local law enforcement agencies. So if something like this happens to you, you can call your local police department. But what it is these virtual kidnapping scams, and what happened to the lady that works with me is that they call you up pretending they have kidnapped a loved one. Now, usually, they found out a little bit about you, they might have gone on to your social media to figure out who you are or what you're doing or where you are, etc. who your friends are. And so many of us have that information out in public on Facebook and elsewhere. So they reach out to you, they say I'm holding so and so hostage. And unless you make this payment, I am not going to release, I'm gonna kill them or whatever it is. So these are virtual kidnapping cases. Now in the case of a lady that works with me, she got a call about a friend she has. And sometimes these are, hey, they're out of the country, they need money to get back in, and I'm with the government, and we're holding them because they did something wrong, etc. There's all kinds of these scams. But she was smart enough to call up that person and found out that yeah, that's not me, I don't know what's going on, I'm fine. There's nothing going on at all. So that's something to keep in mind, too, that you can call, do a little research on your own and follow up because these people are not necessarily really smart or thorough in what they're doing. So keep that in mind as well. But Laguna police department is warning people that it's happening on a wider basis right now.

Craig 6:58
Next up, we have this questionable practice by life insurers; you know that many life insurance companies use your credit rating, to come up to the premium. They do that for all kinds of things now. They do it for health, they do it for employment, looking at your credit rating. And we've also talked before about how in some countries like China, they're using your social credit now to determine whether or not you're worthy for a loan, etc. You know, five years ago, we wouldn't have thought twice about this, who would have thought this is crazy. It's not likely to happen. You guys haven't because we've been talking about this for what 10 or 15 years. But New York's Department of Financial Services has released new guidelines that will allow the life insurance company to use data from customers social media posts to determine their premiums. And experts are saying these rules could potentially extend to other states and you know, some of these federally chartered companies and agencies. So the new guidelines are suggesting that companies can use the data from other nontraditional sources as well, though insurers will have to prove the information doesn't unfairly discriminate against protected groups.

Craig 8:20
There's a bunch of really press release stuff here in the article if you're interested that that's up at http://CraigPeterson.com.

Craig 8:28
The National Association of insurance commissioners released a white paper back in 2012, from what they call their social media working group that address the ways that insurance companies couldn't use social media in their marketing, and also ways to use it to monitor customers. And they're saying that as of 2012, they are already using it. So we've warned everybody for a very long time, do not post things online that you don't want to have shown up later on. Because that's one of the first things that police do when they start investigating someone now, they'll go to your social media; they'll search for you online. Right? Google is their first line of investigation. And it looks like even for this dossier they've been using to go after President Trump and try to show Russian collusion, that even that dossier was put together from online searches on the CNN website of posts people had put up. Man, I heard that this week, I have no idea about the validity of that. But what we say online, reflects us to some degree. And if you do say it online, it can and will be used against you. Now, you know, I like Apple, and I love the way they handled privacy, they don't give all kinds of information out to third parties. They're not trying to mine that information themselves to have some sort of a significant advantage about you or in what you're doing and what you're going etc. So Apple's pretty good about that. But remember that Apple too, if they have a subpoena, that's obviously legitimately issued, they will give up information about you. And they have turned over iCloud accounts and other things. So just because you have things online that you've posted, that are considered private and you shared with your best friend or your family, remember that law enforcement can certainly get at it. Bad guys can get at it, they're always cracking into Facebook accounts, and your friend or family has it and could possibly reshare it at which point now it's no longer private, right? They could repost it; they could save it, they can put it away for a rainy day when they want to play blackmail you. So, be very, very careful about what you say online because much of that can and will be used against you in the court of public or company opinion. And I think New York might have done us a bit of a favor here too. Because it's not just about going on to social media, you know, Facebook, or Twitter or whatever. It really goes to the next level. You know, we've seen deep fakes, we've talked about them here before, one of the big ones is this plane that's kind of flipping around, and it's a big ass jet, that passenger jet. And it was a total fake, and it was shared millions of times online. So you've got that. But you also have legitimate stuff. But I think part of the favor they're doing here is putting something on the record that can be challenged. These life insurance, actuarial tables, the car insurance that you buy, that is based at least partially on your credit rating, how do they work? What are the parameters that go into these? How is the program written? What bugs are there in that program? You don't know they won't tell you. And that's part of the problem I have with what California is doing with getting rid of the bail bondsman. They say well; we can trust this algorithm. No, we can't. How many times have we talked about having computer programs fail on us?

Craig 12:20
So there are are no states right now that have any rules or regulations about how life insurance and the automobile insurers and the bondsman can populate the data for their algorithms for their programs. There's no rules, there's no regulations, you can't challenge them in court. They'll bring in some professional that says some mumbo jumbo that's beyond the judge. It's beyond the jury, and is beyond the truth, right, all in one. But you don't know that. We do know that. They're currently using public records like home ownership data, credit information, education level that you had in college or high school, any civil judgment, any licenses you have anything they can find that's public, and even your internet use in the history of they can get their hands on it. And now this is an extra step and people are freaking out. And I get it; I understand that I would too. And but now we can get the legal system into action. And I hope they do. And I hope that there's a good precedent set and not some lousy precedent. So you know, I just, you see that too much when you have judges, juries, and you know, defense attorneys and prosecution attorneys that really don't understand what's going on. And so then you end up with bad judgments, right? Bad dicta in the cases, from the judges, etc., etc.

Craig 13:59
We got this massive database leak, and I found out about it over the Electronic Frontier Foundation, I put their article up on my site at http://CraigPeterson.com. Earlier this month or security researcher found and disclosed and exposed an unexposed database.

Craig 14:19
And this database was online that these things happen all of the time, people are building software, they don't understand the implications of what they're doing. And I talked about it in my It's a Security Thing, podcast this week.

Craig 14:35
They just don't understand. And because they don't understand, they're just messing everybody up. And I see this almost everywhere. You know businesses, when you have a new product or designing when you have a product you're using, even when you're using a third party software as a service that you might trust, have a true security professional look it over. And there are security professionals available. I know there are almost 3 million job openings in our security world out there. But they are available, pay them you can't pay them enough to come and have a serious look at this.

Craig 15:18
You'll pay to have an attorney come in at hundreds of dollars an hour, some of these attorneys are over $1,000 an hour to look at something to look at the legality because well, you might save tens of thousands or even a million dollars in a lawsuit.

Craig 15:35
Well, the same thing is true with security.

Craig 15:40
If your data is breached, you could easily face it more than a million dollars and find and no judge or jury is going to protect you from that. These are fines that are levied by the regulating agencies. And there's basically nowhere to turn; then on top of it, you could have your customers suing you, you could have consumers, so we knew because their information got out. And you could end up with hundreds of millions of dollars and judgment against you. But no, what are you going to do? Oh, you're just going to trust your IT guy who was a programmer who has his bachelor's or even masters or doctorate in computer programming from some University.

Craig 16:25
No. You need a specialist just like you go to a specialist law firm. You need a true specialist. And the people just aren't doing it. So here's an example of this security researcher. And yeah, we're talking about China here. But China has hired some American companies to build this. So in this case, this database owned by a company called SenseNets. It's a private artificial intelligence company that advertises facial recognition, crowd analysis technologies. So you'd think that they would have some modicum of understanding about security, but they didn't. And they didn't hire a security expert to come in.

Craig 17:20
And what's that going to cost you? 100,000? 200,000? Half a million maybe? And instead of that, they'd rather just lose the whole business because they don't see that as a real risk. Well, let's talk about this risk because we'll get to this Chinese company here in just a second. But let's talk about the risk.

Craig 17:42
There was a cyber security firm that just released a little report saying that they found at least 468 Mongo DB servers exposed to the public internet. Almost 500. Well, what's a Mongo DB server? These are database servers, the main technology group is called No Sequel, but typically used for huge databases. So what is this database that this company SenseNet have in them? SenseNets, excuse me, having it?

Craig 18:21
Well, it turned out all it had was DNA samples, voice samples, fingerprints, iris scans, and much, much more. These were all residents between the ages of 12 and 65 that were from Xinjiang. And they had been questioned about their use of mobile and internet tools. Over there, just having WhatsApp or Skype installed in your phone is classified as subversive behavior. Remember that China is a socialist country, I don't know. But most people I get it, most people don't want to mention the fact that they're Communist or socialist, or they are just incredibly under the thumb of the government. Heaven forbid, you know, we want that here, right in the United States. Right? Yeah. Okay. And since 2017, the authorities and China have told all of the Xinjiang mobile phone users, they have to install the spyware app, to prevent them from accessing terrorist information. That's a quote. Okay. 

Craig 19:37
So we've got evidence now of mass detention centers, newly erected surveillance systems, that China has been bulldozing whole towns because of subversive behavior. All the systems in China that are has been pouring billions of dollars into physical and digital means of, of substantial surveillance in Xinjiang and other regions over there in China. So it's been unclear to a lot of researchers and human rights activists, just what extent these projects as they're operating, you know, heaven forbid, that happened in our country. Oh, wait a minute. It did. Right. We did have surveillance going on. The NSA is scrapping some of those programs; maybe it wasn't the same. Perhaps we haven't been putting people into detention centers. But come on, guys. We're already at a place where five years ago, we didn't think we would be, right? We just discussed that ten years ago, where are we going to be in five or 10 years from now? Hopefully, civil libertarians are out there. Indeed, the major parties have been stepping up; the Democrat Party really hasn't been looking at what Obama did with significant increases in surveillance. I kind of get it after 911 that maybe we want to have a look or look see and figure out what's going on because it kind of hit us from the middle of nowhere in some ways. But that has to go away; it looks like it is going to go away this year under President Trump. And hopefully, the democratic house is going to go along with it as well.

Craig 21:05
But now we have found out we found out more because of this data leak that happened with this security company, I'd laugh and laugh about that, over in the US helping China.

Craig 21:21
So in addition to some of the biometric and other information, this database of 2.6 million people includes their national ID number think social security number, which our government obviously has on us as well. Ethnicity. Well, you know, we've been giving that to our government for years and forms that we fill out. Our nationality, our government has that. Phone number, our government has that. Date of birth, our government has that. Home addresses, our government has that. Employer, our government has that. And photos, our government has that.

Craig 21:57
So all of these same things, types of records that our government has, were found on this database online, from a company that's selling technology to track citizens to the Chinese government. Now over 24 hours, this database collected, just one day, 6.2 million individual GPS coordinates linking these citizens of this province over in China, of this area in China, connecting them to various public camera streams all automatically where they're tracking them in the streets, and identification checkpoints. You love that idea of inspections right? Like Checkpoint Charlie, for those of us that are old enough to remember that.

Craig 22:51
Checkpoints associated with location tags such as hotels, mosques, police stations, the GPS coordinates, all located within Xinjiang where they're doing this service.

Craig 23:05
My gosh, so Givers of he reported a second open database tracking the movements of millions of cars and pedestrians violations, like jaywalking speeding, going through a red light are detected. They trigger the camera to take a photo and ping a WeChat app, presumably to try and tie the event to an identity.

Craig 23:28
It goes on and on. So this database exposed to anyone with an internet connection for the last six months. Oh, by the way, some of these other 468 database servers that were found on the open Internet that were open, contain detailed information about remote access consoles owned by China General Nuclear Power Group, and through GPS coordinates of bike rentals. So there you go with the surveillance state, they're in China.

Craig 24:01
They're tolerating poor engineering, that is getting crackdown on by the way, in western countries, Europe, the United States, companies are getting sued over this. We were helping out a company that, small practice, this is a doctor's office, they're trying to upgrade. Trying to secure things trying to do the right thing. And it was just shocking when we looked into all of these medical apps that are supposedly HIPAA compliant. We did not find a single app; they claimed it was HIPAA compliant, that was HIPAA compliant. Nothing being done about data at rest, and just on and on from there. It's nuts. How bad most of the programming, most of the software is out there. So I feel sorry for a lot of companies because you're stuck. You are stuck. But you've got to find and hire security experts to review what you have in place if they're willing to do it because you know, good guys, I don't run out willy nilly and, and look at networks and look at security setups and everything else. There's just too much for me to do. There's too much business out there. But you still got to do it. And you've got to investigate the people that are working for you that say they have a security background because they may or may not. That leads us to our last story we're able to get to today. Well, I'll get I'll just do this really briefly because I want to hit one other topic, but HR department, now, according to The Wall Street Journal are turning to artificial intelligence to try and find talent because good people are disappearing off the market almost instantly. They're using AI by getting into Microsoft's databases. Remember, they bought LinkedIn, so they've got all kinds of information about people. It's combing through the profiles of more than 610 million members tens of thousands of skills and titles and the looking at behavioral data. And going on and on what jobs candidates are applying for. Citizens Bank launches an AI-powered career coach named Myca, which is short for my career. IBM has a chat box that has AI built into it. And you may have to do that yourself. If you're looking to hire. It's getting more and more difficult to get excellent talent, especially in the IT space and more specifically in the computer security space. And WhatsApp, you probably heard about that if you're not using it. But what tap is a company that was purchased and became part of the Facebook group? And man, the guy that sold it made some clear money. I can't remember what it is offhand. But I think it was in the billion plus range. Well, the founder of WhatsApp is warning people. He's saying you need to delete Facebook immediately. And this article from the Daily Mail over in the UK talks about why all of the reasons why you should and how the disclosure of your information is just it's rampant over at Facebook anyhow.

Craig 27:36
Have a great week we are finishing up our DIY cybersecurity course. This week will be our last week of coaching calls. So shout out to everybody and a big thanks to everybody that's been involved in asking questions. And we've been answering all kinds of questions from everybody. This week. It's getting busier. You can text me 855-385-5553 anytime or just email me@CraigPeterson.com. Hey, have a great week. Bye-bye.

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Related articles:

What’s a Good Alternative to Windows PCs?

‘Delete Facebook Now’: WhatsApp Co-Founder Accuses Mark Zuckerberg Of Trading Privacy For Revenue After Allowing Ads On The Platform

Michael Cohen Investigation Involved Secretive “Triggerfish” Tracking Device

2 ‘Virtual Kidnap’ Scams Within 24 Hours Have Laguna Beach Police On Alert

Life Insurers Can Use Social Media Posts To Determine Premiums, As Long As They Don’t Discriminate

Bizarre Malware Is Disabling Safety Systems At Industrial Plants

Massive Database Leak Gives Us A Window Into China’s Digital Surveillance State

Ransomware Forces Aluminum Manufacturing Giant To Shut Down Network Worldwide

HR Departments Turn To AI-Enabled Recruiting In Race For Talent
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More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

Follow me on Twitter for the latest in tech at:

www.twitter.com/craigpeterson

For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Mar 22, 2019

It's Friday. Time for It's a Security Thing with Craig Peterson. Today, Craig discusses triggerfish, stngrays, and the Michael Cohen investigation.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/22/2019

Michael Cohen Investigation - Triggerfish - Stingrays - Were You Caught Up In The Net

Craig Peterson 0:04
Hello, everybody, Craig Peterson here. And we're going to talk about a technology and security problem from a little bit of a different angle today. You know that we've had police surveillance for years. When they get a warrant, they can start to investigate a little bit further delve in, get some of our records, maybe our cell phone records, maybe even travel records and other things. And of course, they've been casting a pretty wide net with the whole NSA investigations and what they've been allegedly doing for many years. And of course as you know, the good news is it looks like those are coming rapidly to an end. Well, let's look at this Michael Cohen story that came out this week. And you'll see it up. This is on my website at http://CraigPeterson.com and this is from CBS News. The FBI and this is by Graham Kate's, the FBI wanted Michael Cohen cell phones, but they knew they couldn't be found at his home. The problem was Cohen and his family moved into hotel while renovating their apartment. So on April 8, 2018, they decided that they would use something called triggerfish. And they wanted to find his exact location which was a room on the 17th floor at Lowes Regency Hotel. The FBI Special Agent wrote in an affidavit that was unsealed last Tuesday, that federal agents quote sought and obtained authority to employ electronic technique commonly known as trigger fish. To determine the locations of Cohen's two iPhones. The other federal agents ended up obtaining a warrant to retrieve the phones from the room. And there was a court ordered special master that later determined that the federal agents could review the vast majority of nearly 300,000 files on the two phones as well as an iPad, obtained in the search. Now, a special master's someone who can look at the evidence and determine if it might be client confidential, in the case of an attorney like Michael Cohen was, and that the FBI really shouldn't have access to it, or that the information is maybe something that might be pursuant to the case, and legit for them to look at. Now, you might have heard these triggerfishes called stingrays before. And what stingrays do is mimics cell phone towers. So they can pinpoint a phone's location, sometimes even before it makes a call or a text just because of the unique identifier that the phone has.

Craig 2:50
And we're not sure what law enforcement was hoping to get from its use of the stingrays that we're targeting Cohen, because these devices can also collect them calls a text messages and even emails that are sent to and from phones, because they're sitting in the middle and you can do what's known as a man in the middle attack. Now, because they're acting the cell towers, they not they don't just get the data and information from one phone. But any other cell phones a deer in the area are going to see it and try and connect to it. So they can take in information from entire neighborhoods, which is why civil liberties groups for years have objected to the use of these things. They are absolutely crazy. Now they're made by defense contractor Harris Corporation, and the patents that it's filed indicate that they've been used for about two decades, although law enforcement rarely even admits that they have them. So now we found that they are using them, they have been using them for a long time, and they were using them specifically in the Michael Cohen investigation.

Craig 4:01
Now that really is a very big deal because Michael Cohen of course with is the attorney who was involved with President Trump, in this whole Russian collusion investigation.

Craig 4:16
I don't want to go into a whole lot of detail here. But the Congress did authorize what's called a pen register, which is a process that records or decodes the dialing routing address, and you're signaling information so they can figure out who's someone called when they called it from. And a pen register is basically referring referring to back in the day where someone would have a pen and paper in the phone offices, right, the switching office and track the switches and where call was being routed and would write it all down. But there's some serious Fourth Amendment concerns. The rights of citizens against unreasonable searches and seizures. In this case, obviously, for Michael Cohen, they did have a warrant. But how about for everybody else that was caught up in this thing? Yeah, it's a really good question, frankly. But these are cell site simulators. You can make them. I've got the plans to make something kind of similar to use cell phones on the ham radio bands and basically it pretends it's a cell site is not intended to do grab all of this data from all these people. But they are the most interesting know they are out there. There's passive and active ones. I am SI catchers, which are the passer ones as well as the cell site simulators. There is a ton of information out there you can find on it. Check out eff.org. To find out more the Electronic Frontier Foundation. They've got a lot of really good stuff on it. But it looks like the FBI was using some of this latest technology to investigate Cohen and by doing so probably ended up catching a lot of other data that they may or may not have had legal access to as well. So keep that in mind next time you are online. You know it's a Security Thing. And that's what we talked about are right here on my podcast. And visit me online. http://CraigPeterson.com. Make sure you subscribe so you get all of these. http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes and hit the subscribe button.

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Mar 21, 2019

It's A Security Thing Thursday. Today, Craig discusses the bizarre malware that is disabling the safety systems in our industrial plants.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/21/2019

Bizarre Malware Disabling Safety Systems

Craig Peterson 0:06
Hey, welcome all you podcast listeners, it's time for another Security Thing. I want to talk about this bizarre malware that MIT wrote a really interesting article on a report over at MIT Technology Review. Futurism.com picked it up and it's really been kind of making the rounds and mold in certain circles within the security community. And it's different in its attack, because we're talking about malware here that is designed to disable the safety systems at industrial plants. We know that the US and Israel were involved with Stuxnet. And we know about the whole thing that happened over in Iran at the nuclear facility. And that was engineered by two countries. And they were trying to shut down the processing of uranium and those centrifuges. And if you've never seen the centrifuges, you got to have a look at it, because I had in mind something to look like my high school chemistry centrifuges, or the things they use for spinning down blood. These things much, much, much different and more complex, really, they don't even look like a centrifuge frankly, you know, at least from the, you know, the outside point of view. But the US and the Israel apparently designed this malware, and it was very, very well designed. It did two things. One, it caused the centrifuges to spin out of control and destroy themselves, because they were spinning so fast way beyond their normal tolerances. And you'd think, of course, that the centrifuges, which were not made in Iran, by the way, that the centrifuges and their control systems which are not made in Iran would be able to handle this. And in fact, that's what the malware went against was these controllers not made in Iran, that the bad guys in this case, Israel and the US, apparently,that they had the ability to examine and play with and and then come up with this whole attack vector.

Craig 2:25
So they went ahead, they made malware the attacked the controllers for the centrifuges, and apparently ruined a more than 1000 of them. And they also had the malware go after the control systems that were being monitored. So really the monitor systems so that everyone who was in the control portion of the plant would be seeing everything being normal. No alarms going off, no klaxon sounding and lights flashing. All of the charts would look pretty darn normal, that they were all spinning about the right speed. It was just done very, very well, very professional. But it was also done in such a way that no one would lose life over it, these things would spin themselves to the point where they would just destroy themselves. But you know, they were trying not to kill anyone, but it wasn't their primary goal, obviously. Well, now we've got this new hacker tool that's been found. And it's been out there for quite a while. It's called Triton. And it's been out there apparently since 2014. But researchers didn't really become aware of it until around 2017. That's a little worrisome, isn't it? The malware also crosses a new ethical line. Now I know you say malware and ethics, look at what ransomware has done and shut down hospitals, police department. Ransomware is going all the way through taking all of your family pictures away from you. malware is bad. And there is a really there's no ethics involved for these hackers that are spreading it. But they have always in the past, been careful about what they targeted. And they never have seemed in the past to target the safety systems that are in our industrial plants. But that's exactly what's happened right now. There is a gentleman by the name of Joe Slowik, he's a former information warfare officer warfare officer in the US Navy. He's now working at Dragos which is an industrial cyber security firm, according to Futurism. And that firm Dragos has been tracking the spread of Triton.

Craig 4:53
And Joe says that targeting safety systems just seemed to be off limits morally, really hard to do technically. So now we've got to really question things. We've got Dan Coats. He's a former US Director of National Intelligence, who has been warning that things are changing. And here's a quote from him. Here we are nearly two decades later, this was a speech last year. And I'm here to say the warning lights are blinking red again. Today, the digital infrastructure that serves this country is literally under attack. So they are attacking it, they're attacking it in different ways. Triton has been used as a core for attacking a lot of different business systems over the years. But now we're talking about safety systems, the systems that protect nuclear power stations all the way through water treatment facilities, the same types of controllers that were attacked by our government and Israel in that Iranian plant, those same time types of control systems are all over the place in our businesses. They control everything from the heating and air conditioning, through manufacturing systems, through cooling systems, nuclear power plants, and they are dead under attack. So I have a friend that's been in this business for years, I haven't talked to him in probably 20 or 30 years, but he has been trying to really sound the alarm and hasn't been terribly successful. We've got to be careful, we've got to be more careful about our industrial plants and our security. And that means at the very least, we've got to separate our networks. I've got a great module and one of my courses on this, but how to split it up? You know, we're, we're bringing internet of things into our industrial plants. We're bringing in these lights that are controlled by computer to save us money. We're bringing in control systems that heat up the plastics, that will heat up the copper to make wires and, and pull them all out and they're all being automated. And in many places, far too many places, they're on a flat network, you know, the same network, they can all address each other. Even if you separate out the networks, if they can get from one to another, you've got problems. And if you can get to any of these systems via the internet, you've got problems. And just because I've got a firewall doesn't mean it's working for you. Believe me, I have yet to go into one of these companies, you know, 10 million all the way up through half a billion dollars, and have and audited their systems and find that there aren't major problems, where they could have they religious lucky, they haven't been hacked. And of course, you already know, I've been in many businesses where they've already been hacked, where they've already had a failure of the lack of security systems, but a failure of their security systems to the point where they got sued, they went out of business, they lost hundreds of thousands, millions of dollars. In one case, it was tens of millions of dollars. So keep this in mind, they are coming after us. If you are an industrial plant, they want you, they want your equipment, they want to control it. And remember that our enemies have a first line of attack against us being cyber. So many of these attacks are coming from Iran, they are coming from China, they are coming from Russia, they are government sponsored. And their idea is to flip a switch just all of a sudden flip that switch and it's done and over with and we're in deep trouble. Okay?

Craig 8:53
So do the right thing. split your networks, make sure there's no routing between them that you minimize any access to any data, and that there's no external access, and that any access from the inside is tightly controlled. So there you go. All in a nutshell. It sounds like what a weekend's work for you.

Craig 9:10
All right. Take care, but hey, it's a Security Thing. And we'll be back with another one tomorrow, of course, Craig Peterson and that's where you'll find me online. http://CraigPeterson.com

---

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Mar 20, 2019

Craig is on the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. They talked about the Y2K-like bug that would strike GPS systems on April 6th, the hackable smart alarms, and Craig's stern warning to ditch Windows 7 and upgrade to Windows 10.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

'Gps Systems Will Be Struck By Y2k-Like Bug On April 6': Security Expert Says He Will Not Fly On 'Day Zero' After Governments Warn Global Devices Will Reset Due To Calendar Glitch

Google Recommends Windows 7 Users To Upgrade To Windows 10 If Possible, As A Kernel Vulnerability Allows For Local Privilege Escalation On The Operating System.

No Guns Or Lockpicks Needed To Steal Modern Cars If They're Fitted With Hackable 'Smart' Alarms
---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/20/2019

Dangers Of Smart Remotes - GPS Y2K

Craig Peterson  0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here again. And I was on this morning being Wednesday with three stations up in Maine, up in Maine's capital city, as well, and I was on with Ken and Matt. We chatted about a few different things. I ask them some questions about demonetizing deplatforming. What are the legal requirements there? And it was kind of interesting because of course Ken is an attorney to find out what's going on. The mom in Arizona with the kids on YouTube. Boy, what a mess that is. We've got representative Nunez who is threatening suit due to something very similar and we've seen this happen a lot so where is this line supposed to be drawn? Kind of interesting we also of course talked a little bit about technology and Matt's problem where Matt had his fob reprogrammed for his car and tied right in to a story this week about the smart alarms and how imminently hackable they are. So here we go.

Matt Gagnon1:09
Alright, we are back again on 7:37 on the WGAN Morning News. Wednesday morning and get a matter here. And so is Craig Peterson, our tech guru. He joins us now. Craig, how are you?

Craig 1:22
Hello. I'm doing well. I am I'm really interested in what's happened here. You guys have been reporting on this case of the Arizona mother who was abusing their children. And we also have I'm trying to remember who this was, someone in Congress just threatened suit or bringing suit against I think it's Twitter.

Matt 1:48
Yeah. You were thinking about Mr. Nunez.

Craig 1:48
Yeah, yeah. Exactly.

Ken Altshuler  1:51
That's what you call a publicity stunt.

Matt  1:52
Yes. He's gonna fail miserably.

Craig 1:53
You think so? You think that's what it is?

Ken 1:54
Of course. Of course.

Matt 1:55
Because he knows he's gonna lose. So what else would it be?

Ken  1:51
Public figure.

Craig 1:56
Yeah. Well that's a really good point. How about we've got the Hallmark Channel cutting ties with Laurie we know this whole college admissions scandal and stuff. How far can that go ultimately? Because, again, they've got clauses in their contracts on saying that they have to be a good character,

Ken 2:21
By the way, I pay nearly half a million dollars for my children to go to college, I don't see what the big deal is.

Craig 2:28
In Arizona again, obviously, this woman what she's charged with is just absolutely crazy. But can we have all of these social media platforms and other ways that people are making money and trying to get messages out? Can people be deplatformed at the drop of a hat? And should they be? It's an interesting question. I don't know how far this goes. I've heard Nunez and and his complaints. And I've heard other people, particularly conservatives saying that their messages are being stopped or they've been deplatformed. And we've certainly seen that with Alex Jones and some others who Alex isn't accused of anything illegal. It just being a real jerk, I think is is kind of the bottom line for him. But is it again, interesting territory? I don't know. Ken, had the courts really settled any of this stuff yet?

Ken 3:20
I think it's basic libel and slander law. I think if you're a public figure it's virtually impossible to be...

Matt 3:22
But as it relates to like deplatforming and stuff like that, that's
their company, they can do whatever they want with it. I mean, it's if they want to, they want to ban me for having brown hair or blue eyes. I mean, they could do that. Whenever. And perhaps it's not the wisest thing for them to do. And I think it opens a gigantic door for a competitor that isn't such a, you know, terrible company to actually operate. But you know, they want to do that they could do that.

Craig 3:51
Yeah, yeah, I agree on that part. That's certainly the libertarian to me coming out for that. Anyhow, it was interesting, I thought I would ask the experts this morning.

Ken 4:00
Well, talking about experts, since you're the expert guru in computers, are we going to have another Y2K thingamajiggy?

Craig 4:09
Oh, this this is really weird. This one that hit me a few weeks ago and hit my inbox as it were. And Y2K of course, we have a problem with the rollover from a computer is able to use just a two digit year to figure out the time and elapsed time, you know, where they were just use, like 74, I wrote code that just choose the last two digits of the year back in the you know, in the 70s and and it's been going on for a long time. So everyone was worried what's going to happen when it turns from being able to issues 99 to zero, because they're always lower than 99. But it turns out most businesses had fixed the problems and none of these problems were were anything that would have been really earth shattering if they had to get at least not in most cases. Now we've got a security expert who about two weeks ago out at a security conference in San Francisco said that he's not going to fly on April 6 and the reason for that is that older GPS systems don't have the ability to handle dates past April 6 it's actually a specific time on April 6. But here's the problem the counters in the old GPS systems don't have enough digit so they are going to roll back to zero. And we look at what's happening right now with Boeing's jet, the 737 Max 8 right and that jet airliner. How long ago was that designed? Do you guys know?

Matt  5:57
The 737?

Craig 6:00
What is it? Is that it? Yeah, the Max 8.

Matt 6:01
Yes, Max. Yeah, the 737 Max. I have no idea what it is. No, I can't even begin to claim that I have any idea

Craig 6:07
Such a 50 year old design and what's been happening over the years is they've been making a minor changes kind of, you know, few changes of the time. So the whole jet airliner has not had to be retested. So for instance, right now they added this system that people are saying like be the problem could be the problem. Boeing saying it's more along the lines of the pilots weren't trained enough, they only had a few hundred hours of flight time. But inside these airplanes are systems that were designed 50 years ago. And so this expert is saying, Hey, listen, this could be a real problem because the GPSs from 20 years ago, cannot handle the rollover the guy's name is Bill Malik. He's a VP over Trend Micro which is a basically a security company and he's concerned because these GPS systems aren't just to use in things like airports and airplanes although I'm sure in pretty much every case the airplane have been updated, right? I'm I don't have a problem with flying on April 6 personally. But we also have these embedded systems that are used for their clock source for that signal. And they're using everything from traffic control systems through a computer systems. Some of the older ones, the bridges, some of the automatic bridges that we have in Maine, like one going down to New Hampshire that that goes up and down based on what the traffic is on the on the water below. A lot of these systems are based on using clocks from GPSs. So Ken we could have a Y2K type problem with anything with an older embedded GPS in them on April 6. And it does bring up the problem of, again, updating our software, our firmware, our hardware, you know, when was the last time you updated the software in your firewall in the router in your home. This statistics on the more or horrific. People just aren't updating them. So it brings it to light. And yeah, GPS could be a problem. And you might even have it with your car GPS, if you have an old GPS for your car. It might just plain old completely stopped working on April 6.

Matt 8:38
And we're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins who us on Wednesdays at this time to go over what's happening in the world of technology. Craig, I had a little bit of a car issue a while back a couple weeks ago had to get somebody to basically break into my car and reprogram a fob which he was able to do by basically plugging in a little computer to my car. And about 30 seconds later, he had now taken over the entire security system and it was able to start it remotely and basically we had complete and total control over the car by plugging something in. Is my car a little vulnerable to being taken over by surreptitious evil people trying to steal it in some fashion, or maybe perhaps taking it over for other nefarious purposes?

Craig 9:25
You know what kind of car I drive, right?

Matt 9:29
Yeah, like an old one. Yeah.

Craig 9:30
1980 Mercedes diesel okay. There is missing electronics on it. Yeah, actually, you are. And it's yet another reason to lock your car. Because if they get can gain access to that little computer port inside, many of the cars can be totally hacked. Now, the manufacturers are trying to keep that technology kind of secret. But man is it gotten out and it's in the hands of even people that change locks, you know, the fob you talked about. But we've got this week as a British firm. They're called Pentest Partners. And they had heard about some vulnerabilities with some of the smart alarms that people have been putting in their cars. So they did some testing. And they've come out with a warning and they're warning is that they found that the Viper Smart Start alarm Viper Smart Start alarm, which I'm sure many people here have in their cars get is great to start your car get warmed up in the wintertime and get into a nice warm car. But the Viper Smart Alarms as well as product from Pandora where they're making, not Pandora, the radio app that you might be using, but Pandora, the guys that make the smart alarms. Both of them are riddled with flaws. According to the report. That's a direct quote from them. And it turns out that the manufacturers had inadvertently exposed around 3 million cars to theft and users to hijack. Because what they can do is without even having access to that computer port in the car, they're able to get on remotely and do anything that that smart alarm could do and do it to your car. And it turns out even more than you think the smart alarm might be able to do just like with your car Matt where he could get in and do a whole bunch of different things inside your car. These can too and they found they could remotely hack the car that they could then from that car not only unlock it or start the engine but if you're driving down the highway in that car, they could control the accelerator so they could take you for ransom, floor the car have that car going full speed down the turnpike as fast as it could possibly go with you sitting behind the wheel unable to do anything about it you know. Burn outs, your brakes, etc. So there they did a live proof of concept demo, they could do geo-locate the target car using the Viper Smart Start account. Built in functionality. They set off the alarm so that the driver went out to investigate and stopped, activated the cars and mobilizer once it was stationary, remotely unlock the cars doors. They clone the key fob. They issued RS commands from a user's mobile phone. And even worse, they discovered this function in the Viper API that remotely turned off the cars engine. There, these devices can do a whole lot. So check your smart alarm, your smart remote start, see if it's vulnerable, what the vulnerabilities are not all of the vulnerabilities I mentioned are true for both of these alarms. But they have been shown in the past. We've seen Chrysler's be able to be taken over. Remotely driven off the road. But the hacker had to have access to the car first. Now we're seeing that some of these smart alarms have way more access than we thought they did. And could turn out to be very, very dangerous.

Ken 13:15
We are talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru. By the way you can go to https://CraigPeterson.com anytime you want to know anything about technology. Thank you, Mr. Peterson. We'll talk to you on next Wednesday at 7:38.

Craig 13:27
Hey, take care. Gentlemen, I want to make one quick warning. Before I go. Google has now issued a warning to everyone to abandon Windows 7 right now. They say there's a major security problem with Windows 7 there. Google is advising you to upgrade to Windows 10. And this is a kernel vulnerability problem. Local privilege escalation something.

Ken 13:55
I think I have Windows 7.

Matt 13:57
I think I have Mac.

Ken 13:58
But I have Windows on my Mac.

Matt 14:00
That's old.

Craig 14:00
Well, it's true for that too. So if you're still running Windows 7, if this isn't the siren call to upgrade, quote unquote, to Windows 10 do it now. But you might be better off and upgrade to a Mac. That's what I did.

Ken 14:14 
Yeah. But I have a Mac but have Windows on it.

Craig 14:16
Yeah, but you're still gonna have to do it. You're gonna have to upgrade your Windows on your Mac that's living in the VM or the dual boot loader

Ken 14:23
That's living in VM. That's where it's living.

Craig 14:26
Yeah. Which is good that helps keep it separate but you're gonna have to upgrade it. This is bad, this is really bad.

Ken 14:33
Okay, thanks for the warning. 

Matt 14:35
Craig Peterson. Thanks a lot. Alright, we are going to take a quick break here are we not?

Craig 14:41
Hey everybody. Plan is to be here  tomorrow and Friday as well with my security thing, you know, it's just a security thing. Well, how does it matter, right? So hopefully I'll be able to get those done today and we'll get those out. But it's stories of individuals and companies who have been hacked or who averted a hack, what happened? What they did? And what could have been done better about it?. So if you're enjoying those let me know. me@CraigPeterson.com.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

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Mar 19, 2019

Craig is on with Danny Farrantino once more on the Jim Polito show. They talked about the GPS security flaw that is worse than the Y2K bug which could cause havoc in a lot of computer systems on April 6th. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

'Gps Systems Will Be Struck By Y2k-Like Bug On April 6': Security Expert Says He Will Not Fly On 'Day Zero' After Governments Warn Global Devices Will Reset Due To Calendar Glitch

Google Recommends Windows 7 Users To Upgrade To Windows 10 If Possible, As A Kernel Vulnerability Allows For Local Privilege Escalation On The Operating System.

No Guns Or Lockpicks Needed To Steal Modern Cars If They're Fitted With Hackable 'Smart' Alarms

--- 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/19/2019

Major Problems With GPS - Car Security Systems Hackable

Craig Peterson: 0:00
Good morning. Craig Peterson here. I was on this morning with the Jim Polito show. It was actually Danny because Jim is on a tour. He is over touring in Italy. He was in Venice yesterday. And he's going on to Ireland. He sounds like he's just having a great time. So Danny and I chatted this morning, and I did some explanations here of GPS, what it is, how it works and how it's going to affect you. I think this is much better explanation than I did last time on the radio. Oh, well. Anyways, here we go with Mr. Danny Farrantino.

Danny Farrantino 0:35
Yes, by now. You know what that music means? Time for Tech Talk expert, Craig Peterson. And Craig. GPS systems are going to be struck by a Y2K bug. Come on, this can't be real.

Craig 0:48
Hey, good morning, Danny. Yeah, this is a real problem. And most people don't understand what's going on. And this is something I wasn't even aware of just a week and a half, two weeks ago, before I came across this. You know, we've been having these issues with the airplanes, right? And, and the Boeing jet that has been grounded pretty much worldwide. And the reason for that seems to be new software, some new systems and things on board. But you know, how long ago that base airplane was designed, Danny?

Danny 1:23
I do not, Craig, know. But I'm sure you do.

Craig 1:27
About 60 years old. 6 zero years old. Yeah. And what's been happening. And this is common for airplane manufacturers. But what's been happening is they make small changes to the airplane and they get it approved. So the whole plane doesn't have to be rechecked. And they eventually end up with a situation like today, where it's no longer the pharaohs boat, for those of you from law school, remember that story. But we will get into that right now. But the here's the problem we're looking at today. GPS has been around for many, many decades now. And of course, it works by having satellites up in the air above us and and in in space, and they send a signal down and our GPS units pick it up. Well, that signal is actually a primarily a clock signal.

Craig 2:25
Have you ever been ever heard something loud in the distance, like lightning? For instance, right?

Danny 2:31 
Yep.

Craig 2:31
And you see it before you hear it usually, right? What happens with lightning? If you see it and hear it at the same time? How far away is it?

Danny 2:42
Pretty, pretty damn close.

Craig 2:45
Exactly, you know, the closer it is between seeing it and hearing it, the closer that lightning is. So that's the same basic way that GPS works. All of these satellites are in orbit, they're all in a fixed spot. The software knows exactly where they are. So the satellite identifies itself, and then sends a high precision time code. So satellites that are further away the time code is going to be older than satellites that are closer to you, they're going to have a newer time code. So that's how GPS works. And sitting there listening to those times code and deciding, oh, that satellite is further away than that satellite. And it's so much further based on this real high precision time code. So there you go. There's a geek moment of the morning. But the problem that we're looking at right now is these older devices, including older airplanes, bridge control systems, systems that change traffic from one direction to another direction at a certain time of day, many of those relies heavily on GPS, not to position themselves necessarily, but to get an accurate time. So they will they want to know when 3pm is why not listen to those high precision atomic clock that are being broadcasted all over the world?

Danny 4:14  
We have one here.

Craig 4:16 
And you do exactly. Now I have one at my house, do we use them to synchronize all of our computers' clocks. Well, older GPS systems have an overflow problem. I know you mentioned earlier this morning Y2K. And we were very worried about Y2K, because many programmers like myself programming in the 70's and the 60's, we were too worried about whether or not 70 meant 2070 or 1970. We knew that 70 meant that our clock or our timestamp was really 1970. And so we had that two digit year, here comes 2000 that rolls over, there were some problems but it wasn't catastrophic. Well, how about all of these embedded systems, when was the last time you upgraded the firmware in your car?

Craig 5:09
When was the last time you updated the firmware in your firewall or your router. And hopefully, you do that pretty frequently. But I can tell you 99% of people never ever touched them. So about two weeks ago, in San Francisco, there was a conference, a security conference, and there was an expert out there saying that he will not fly, he will not get in an airplane on April 6. And the reason for that. And this by the ways of VP over at Trend Micro and Bill Malik is his name. And the reason is because the counters in the older GPS systems are going to overflow on April 6. It is going to reach the end of their counters are going to ramp back to zero.

Danny 5:57
So in theory the GPSs might not be set up properly. And you,yeah, I know, it makes sense why you might not want to fly that day.

Craig 6:03
Exactly. So there's more than him that just isn't going to fly that day. But this is a warning that was initially issued in April 2018. We have all of these older systems, and then some of them are guaranteed to have problems on April 6th. Hopefully, none of our airplanes do. But this could this could be real catastrophe. He's saying, now Trend Micro, they deal a lot with computer security systems. And, and, you know, maybe, maybe he's trying to get a little bit of news. But I know personally that the GPS systems that were made 20 years ago were very primitive. They're embedded in all kinds of devices. And the risk here is substantially greater than the risk we had with Y2K because the Y2K bug, there were very few systems that could, if they failed, cause people to die. These GPS systems that are embedded could cause people to die. And April 6 is the day. So fingers crossed, the manufacturers and owners of all these systems have taken care of it.

Danny 7:10
So that was my next question then. So here's the big question is what's being done to either prevent this, or we just waiting till April 6 and saying waiting to see what happens?

Craig 7:20
Well, there are a lot of companies that waited until January 1, 2000, to figure out if anything was going to happen. This time around. I think there's a lot of companies that aren't even aware, including government agencies that aren't even aware that there could be a problem. So there's certainly a lot of companies that have taken care of this already, some government agencies that have but if there is 20 year old hardware out there somewhere and think about military systems. And again, think about airplanes, 20 year old hardware, is it going to have this problem. Commercial airlines, I would expect to all of them have taken care of this problem. They've looked into it, these aren't idiots out there. But when it comes to some of these systems that are sitting in the back corner, just plugging away every day. That's where I'm getting really worried.

Craig 8:09
Well, that's it. You have that from Craig. Moving on though, I do want to hit a couple more topics before we have to let you go. The hackable smart alarms turns out, thieves may not even need a key or tools to steal your car from that one.

Craig 8:22
Yeah, this goes back again to so many businesses, just not being aware of the security implications of what they're doing. Car security alarm companies for years and decades. I remember buying these things in the 80's right and earlier, they were very simple. And if a switch was thrown, the alarm went off. Nowadays, they're putting APIs, application programming interfaces into their software, and just all kinds of smart technology. And we now have some penetration testing companies, including one over in the UK called Pentest Partners. They've been looking at these smart alarms after they heard about a problem. So they found that the Viper smart alarm and products from Pandora who makes alarms were riddled with all kinds of security flaws. And they found that they could steal a car fitted with any of these affected devices. They could steal them, they could shut off the engine and talking about wrecking havoc, they could cause the cars to go into full throttle mode while they're out on the road. Which means if you want to kill a lot of people and create a lot of havoc, sounds like it's simpler than we would hope.

Danny 9:42
There's a lot more than just stealing a car. It's taking complete control of that cars there, Craig.

Craig 9:48
Exactly. without doing anything, you know, we had the Chrysler problem where you could hack their entertainment system and take over the whole car, but you had to have physical access to that Chrysler car in order to do it. This doesn't require any physical access to the car. It can all be done remotely. 

Danny 10:09
It's certainly scary stuff Craig. Thank God, we have people like you keeping us safe. As always, we have so much stuff here. We never didn't get to somebody wants to hear more. What can they do?

Craig 10:18
Well, they can text me and I want to put one more quick warning in. Google's warning, everyone that's using Windows 7 to abandon it immediately. Windows 7. This is a warning out of Google and their security department. They say you need to upgrade to Windows 10 immediately. There is a huge security flaw with Windows 7. But you can text me 855-385-5553. That's 855-385-5553.

Danny 10:50
Standard data and messaging rates do apply. Craig, appreciate the time and we'll talk again next week.

Craig 10:55
Hey, thanks Danny. Take care.

Danny 10:56
As always. Craig Peterson there with some great stuff for us here on a Tuesday morning.

Craig 11:03
Hey, everybody. If you enjoy my podcast, make sure you let me know and subscribe. subscriptions is how we move up in the charts. That's how other people find us. So go to  http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. That'll take you directly to the 800 pound gorilla, which of course is Apple and you can subscribe right there. You can subscribe on almost anything frankly, I'm out there all over the place. And then once you subscribe. If you think I'm worth five stars, by all means, please put in a five star rating. I'd appreciate it. All right, everybody take care of we'll be back tomorrow from Maine.

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Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

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Mar 18, 2019

Craig is with Jack Heath this morning talking about the tech side of Beta O'Rourke's campaign.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/18/2019

Technology Behind Beta O'Rourke Campaign

Craig Peterson 0:00
Good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here this morning I was on with Jack Heath. And of course he is on dozens of stations here in the northeast. And I wanted to talk with him about politics because that's what his big thing is. Right? New Hampshire. Our state sport is politics. There's no question about it. Well, I found some really interesting things about what Beta O'Rourke is doing. And about the future of campaigning. It was fascinating to me to find out some just records that Beta had said.

Jack Heath 0:36 
Joining us now on the Auto Fair listener lines, Craig Peterson, our Tech Talk guy. And Craig, good Monday morning to you. How are you?

Craig 0:44 
Hey, good morning, Jack. I've been watching this of Beta O'Rourke campaign from a technology side and I found a bunch of interesting things about him. You were just talking about as money bomb, right?

Jack 0:56 
Yeah, I guess he's done well on the fundraising, right.

Craig 1:00
He has and I look back to what he had been doing during his race against the, you know, Texas Senator Ted Cruz and how did he raises money and I found an article online talking about what he had done. And it was one of the campaign workers. In fact, that was kind of giving this information out. But apparently what he ended up doing is beta took the same fundraising company that Bernie Sanders had been using in his run for the presidency last time against Hillary Clinton. And some of the people ended up leaving that particular agency. He followed them to a new agency. And then what he's doing is entirely a modern campaign. You know, back in the day, we used to send mailings out and get them in our mailbox every day, looking for money, trying to get people to, you know, get on board. And what O'Rourke's been doing is completely different? He does. He didn't have campaign field offices only had 10 of them across the entire state of Texas. He used social media and he got volunteers to put together what he was calling pop up campaign offices. He had almost 900 of them across the state of Texas. He was using advertising and is right now as well. Looking at his run up here before he announced. He had more than 330 different ads running just on Facebook to try and hone his message. See which adds brought in money which ads brought in people to sign up for his email list. Let me tell you, Jack this Beta O'Rourke is somebody who's really using modern technology in order to to build his base and bring in record amounts of money. The 38 million dollars he raised to go against Ted Cruz was just phenomenal.

Justin 3:00
And Craig you probably know this. But yeah, Beta O'Rourke is part of a hacker group in the 80s known as the Cult of the Dead Cow went back when hacker groups were less nefarious than they are now so yeah he's he's been involved in tech for a while here.

Craig 3:20
Well I remember that. In fact I hadn't heard about it for years Justin. The whole Cult of the Dead Cow and everything else that was going on and the time was when a hacker wasn't a bad guy. You know, hackers used to be people who were just hacking at code. They weren't professionals. They didn't really know programming that well but they like to do it. Nowadays. We call hackers you know that from back in the 80s we call people hackers who are people who just learned programming in 30 days by reading a book and go into a Microsoft site you know that that type of person but yeah, you're right. Justin. He was hacking back then. But back then we used to call bad guys crackers. And we used to call non professionals, hackers. Today we don't use the term cracker anymore. And hacker has nefarious overtones to it. I don't know if I explained that well or not.

Jack 4:19 
Well, one of the things I guess he's taken some heat on is something he had written as a hacker about hitting some kids while driving. And, you know, obviously, you know, all these candidates, speaking of social media, they're all gonna have to be very careful right, on what they say. or post or because everything will be sanitized for sensitivity.  Correct. You know, I just everything's scrutinized, but certainly he and others will more and more the way the electronics are changing will convert that to their campaign no doubt is because so much is now social media and technology.

Craig 4:50 
But look at Chelsea Clinton this past week where she was confronted by some of the some students and they were just jumping down her throat because of things that she said, and they were blaming her for the massacre somehow in New Zealand. And her words were extremely carefully chosen because Jack, you're so spot on things that we say even things we don't put up on social media, people are going to keep them. Just just last week we had two weeks ago now we had a leak of some audio from years ago that's causing a politician nothing but headaches. So yeah, I think everybody has to be careful because even if you're going to be a CEO of a company or some high level manager, things you said today even things you didn't post but someone else recorded you saying it, are going to pop up. Now in New Hampshire, we are not a two party state so it is illegal unless they change that law. Recently, it is illegal in New Hampshire for you to record someone without their knowledge and permission. But believe me, people are filming everything, recording everything. And stuff you say it's going to come back to haunt you.

Jack 6:00
All right Craig Peterson, good stuff good stuff this morning. Http://CraigPeterson.com, our Tech Talk. Thank you Craig.

Craig 6:08 
Hey thanks Jack.

Hey, I have a quick question for all you guys and gals listening on the podcast. I've been doing my security thing podcast just you know, couple of week and I've been including them in this podcast stream and I'm thinking about continuing that and then maybe even expanding it and putting it up on YouTube as well as video What do you guys think? Do you think that that's something be worthwhile letting you know about security incidents really kinda like a little bit of a deeper dive into the news. Let me know. me@CraigPeterson.com. I'd be really interested to know if you think that would be useful. I think it'd be useful for you but you know, you have to put a lot of work into it. So at least I'd like some validation, right. Just Me@CraigPeterson.com. Do you think I should go ahead and put together a little YouTube channel? You know, it's a security thing. Take care guys. Bye bye.

---

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s 737 Crash - NSA Surveillance Program

Craig Peterson 0:00

Mar 16, 2019

Have you heard about sextortion?  We will talk about this type of blackmail scam and why it is so dangerous.  

Android vs. iPhone, what is your choice? Today, we're going to talk about it from the resale value side

What's up with GPS systems? Why are some experts not flying on  April 6?  I got some news and explanations for you.

And we have a report out of the UK, The Guardian about how easy it is to steal modern cars.  We will discuss why that is. 

Did you hear about the warning from Google this week? We will get to that and some other unexpected actions from Google

 

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/16/2019

Duckduckgo For Search - Google Advisory On Windows 7 - Cars Hacked Via Their Security Systems

Craig 0:00 
Hi, everybody, we're up to show number 998.

Craig 0:12

Does that mean we have to do something special, coming up here in a couple more shows? I can't believe 1000 weeks worth of shows. I don't number my shows based on the,

Craig 0:21

you know how many times I've appeared or how many times I've put podcasts up. Because I do, sometimes five. I've done as many as a dozen different podcasts in a week before. So I don't add them up like that. I'm talking about 1000 weeks on the air, on the radio. That is absolutely fantastic. It's frankly, it's just so exciting. I'm glad that it's happening. Well, today, we are going to be talking about sextortion. You might have seen this, I had one of the listeners reach out to me about this just a couple of weeks ago. And in fact, it happened to me, as well. We'll talk about Android vs. iPhone. This time, we're going to talk about it from the resale value side. GPS systems, April 6, I got some news for you. Some experts have decided they're not going to fly on April 6th, explain why. And we have a report out of the UK, The Guardian about modern cars much easier to steal than the old ones, and why? Google has a very big warning out this week that will get to. And Google did something else that was not expected by a lot of people. Google has quietly added Duck Duck Go as a search engine option for Chrome users. This is about 60 different markets globally in this is really big news. Because the chromium engine, of course, is made by Google. And you know, already the Google is very big in the search engine space. So, having them promote, which is what this effectively is doing. Having them promote competitors is a little bit of surprise to everybody out there. Now, chromium, I mentioned this a few weeks ago, which is the underlying technology for Google's Chrome browser is being adopted by Microsoft, they are completely shooting their own browser projects in the head. And they're building it all on top of chromium now, which I think makes a whole lot of sense. So does that mean Microsoft now is going to be using Duck Duck go, let me explain what this is? For those who are wondering, Duck Duck Go isn't just a kids game from 50 years ago, or probably longer than that, actually duck Duck go is a search engine. And it is designed with privacy in mind. I've had the founder of Duck Duck Go on my radio show before we talked a little bit about what he was doing. This was some years back when he was first getting started. And I'm actively promoted since then. And since using it, frankly. But people are saying, well, Duck Duck Go is the search engine to use because it is not tracking what you're searching for. It's just giving you kind of general advertisements, just like Google used to 10 years ago. And other people are saying, Well, why would I use Duck Duck go when Google has, frankly, better search engine technology, which it does, in many ways. Google has been able to invest a lot of money into its search engine technology and Duck Duck go just really can can't, at least not to the level that Google can. Now some people who are kind of skeptical, myself included are thinking that maybe Google did this with chromium in order to avoid some of the antitrust scrutiny. The anti-combines laws that are in Canada, UK much throughout the Commonwealth, but it is good news for people

Craig 3:59

I use Duck Duck Go as my first go to choice when I'm searching online, it doesn't track you it, I kind of like it, it doesn't always give me the results that I really need or really want. So for those types of results, sometimes I'll end up going to Google and check there. And I use Bing for some types of searches to. I find bings image search to be a little bit better, in some ways than Google Search. Bing doesn't have the reverse image search that Google has. But you know, all in all, I think it's pretty good. There's another pro-privacy search engine out there called quant I've used that before q, w, a, n t and chromium Google now offers that is another default. So you might want to look at that Duck Duck Go and QUANT and QUANT, by the way, is only available as a default over in France, which is where QUANT is from. But you can always just go to Q U A N T dot com or Duck Duck Go dot com. And you can use it in almost any browser out there as a default, and it's been added in I'm looking through the list Canada, basically all of our neighbors, I don't see Mexico on here. That's kind of interesting. See the UK, US Venezuela is, you know, if they get power back down there, they'll be able to use it. Good old socialist countries, right. So anyways,

 

Craig 5:30
it's been growing for years, it's really quite good. And this Chromium instance, available on GitHub, if in case you're a developer is worth looking at. I also when we're talking about Chromium, I got to make sure I mentioned my other browser, my favorite browser for privacy. And that's the Epic browser. E-P-I-C. And I think on today's coaching call, we're going to end up talking a little bit about that Epic browser. Because a lot of people are kind of concerned and confused. And the Epic browser also uses Chromium as a code base, which I think is good, because Chromium is kind of those standard but it also just dropped a note down for myself. But it also has the types of security the DuckDuckGo has, in fact, it's kind of tied in hand in hand, it has VPN routes through it used to just be Indiana out routes through a whole bunch of different places. So check it out. E-P-I-C, browser.com. Epic browser.com online and use DuckDuckGo whenever you can, for your searches. If you want to try and keep things a little bit on the private side. And if you're very paranoid, your best bet mom depends on how paranoid right if you're like crazy paranoid, we're you know, we're not going to talk about that right now. I could help you out. But if you're more paranoid do the other thing I do, which just switches it up, use different search engines use different browsers use different machines when it comes to banking because I don't want many my banking information to be stolen. And I got to get back to some of what I'm doing some of it. Some of it I'm not if you're interested, let me know might be worth doing a masterclass about you know how to do this, how to do it for free even and keep your banking information safe. So I should write a little note about that. Well, we have a warning from Google, we're going to get into that right now.

Craig 7:33
Well, our friends at Google have been paying attention to security for a while, if you have the latest versions of the Google Chrome browser, you're getting automatic updates. It's a technology that Firefox Mozilla people have been using for a long time.

Craig 7:48
And these auto updates are absolutely fantastic. It can just save you a ton, not only of time but not having to apply the updates. But you know, security people can break in and drive-by download, you know, all the crap that happens when you're online. So Google has been very good about updating their Google Chrome browser, the Chromium underpinnings and you know, they get updated as well. But then the browser is really where they're most interested. Well, now, Google is warning people about Windows 7, you know, if you're listening for a while, that a month or so ago, Microsoft told you to ditch to drag Internet Explorer into that trash can and never use it again. You know that right? Number two now with Google out here is Google's recommending Windows 7 users to stop using Windows 7 upgrade immediately to Windows 10, if at all possible. And this is because of something called a kernel vulnerability. The kernel is the core part of the operating system. The kernel is where everything happens, really the kernel is how all of the processes talk to each other, how they can access hardware resources, like the disk, or the camera, the microphone, the speakers, everything on your computer ultimately goes through what's called the kernel.

Craig 9:18
Wow. Well, the third analysis group is explained that Google's discovered two different security vulnerabilities, one in the Google Chrome browser. And the other one in Windows. The Chrome bug was already patched. But Windows 7 not yet fixed. Now this month, the Patch Tuesday from Microsoft has a doozy set of patches, a whole bunch of them, Microsoft is fixing all kinds of major flaws and vulnerabilities in their software. I don't think this particular fixes in that patch set. But it'll be out sometime, I'm sure Microsoft saying the vulnerability is in the Win32k.sis kernel driver. And it can be used as a security sandbox escape. Now, this is getting all rather technical, but sandboxes are where you set up a basically a way to execute software that nothing else can get access to. And it can't get access to anything else as well. So you use sandboxes for security. And having a major security problem with the security sandbox obviously is very big. So here's the statement we strongly believe this vulnerability may only be exploitable on Windows 7, due to recent exploit mitigation to added newer versions of Windows, Windows 10, and eight, all the Windows 10 has the most fixes. They've done a lot there.

Craig 10:53
They're trying to make it as good as Mac OS. It'll be a while before they get there. But they're almost to the point that Unix was at 20 years ago. So you know, kudos to Microsoft. To date. Back to the quote to date, we have only observed active exploitation against Windows 7 32 bit systems. So the note from our friends at Google and their security research team is get rid of Windows 7 upgrade to Windows 10 as soon as you can. Microsoft says it is working on a fix. They are publicly disclosing the existence they're saying it is a serious vulnerability. So they're admitting it no big deal. There will see, By the way, Windows 7 is reaching the end of support the end of 2019, it's actually January 2020, read it however you want. But you've only got months left before Windows 7 will no longer get patches unless you pay Microsoft a king's ransom. In other words, our federal government will be spending a lot of software with Microsoft. I'm sure in the years ahead. It's still paying Microsoft to support Windows XP. Isn't that crazy? Let's talk about our new cars for a second

Craig 12:19
We talked last week a little bit about our cars and insurance with autonomous vehicles. What does it mean? When are things going to get better? When are they going to get worse? Well, we have more smart in cars today. They have something called CAN bus which links up all of these computers throughout the machine throughout your car. You know, most cars nowadays and more modern ones, they don't even have a connection from your stereo to the speakers directly. There's no amplifier in there. It's all going over this network in your car, little land in the car. Well, that means that computers are there and they can be exploited. We have already seen that we saw a hack that went through the radio in some of the Chrysler products and allowed people to remote control Chrysler cars if they use this hack on their radios. So it is a concern. I'm not sure they've addressed it all well enough and not just talking about Chrysler here I'm talking about everybody gets me very concerned. There's been issues with BMW and others in the past as well. Well, there's a British infosec company called Pen Test Partners and they found that the Vipers Smart Start alarm and products from Pandora were riddled with flaws. And these flaws allowed them to have an attacker steal a car fitted with one of these devices. So if you have a Viper Smart alarm, the Smart Start alarm, which I do know people who have this. I'm gonna have to reach out, let them know individually case they're not listening today. But the Viper Smart Start alarm and products from Pandora allow cars to be hijacked. And now here's from a blog post about they're finding from Pen Test Partners. Before we contacted them, the manufacturers had inadvertently exposed about 3 million cars to theft and their users to hijack.

Craig 14:28
This is a very, very big deal. This was really started because of Pandora's alarms. The company noticed that their security was advertised as being on hackable, which is a bad thing to say right? What's on the hackable. So I guess Pen Test Partners took that as a challenge. And they found an API, which is this application programming interface and some simple parameter manipulation that allowed them to be able to change the Viper Smart Start user's account password, registered email addresses, giving them full control over the app. And the car that the alarm system was installed on. All they had to do was send a regular web post request to the API with a parameter email redefined to one of their own choices, and that overrode the legitimate owner's email address, and now they had control over the account. So there you go. Okay, major issues using the apps ability to clone the key fob issue RF commands from a user mobile phone. And they dug into this little bit more, by the way, and they discovered a function in the Viper interface that remotely turned off the car's engine. So the pen or a big also allowed researchers to remotely enable the car's microphone so they could listen to eavesdrop the conversation on the occupants. And they also said the Mazda 6, the Range Rover Sport, the Kia, what is this, Course I guess. The Toyota Forerunner, Mitsubishi Pajero, Toyota Prius 50, and the Rav4 all appear to have undocumented functionality present in the alarm API to remotely adjust the cruise control speed. So it goes on and on car, security remains poor, and you don't need guns, you don't need lock picks, to steal modern cars, or to even to cause them to crash. I wonder if, if any of the crash investigators might look into this, if they realize, wait a minute, there's a remote controllable API in this car, maybe we should subpoena the court records from the manufacturer of the device and poke around a little bit and see if maybe someone manipulated it and told the car to floor it down a back road Street, we're going to have to get a little smarter about some of this stuff, right? Even though the criminal investigations. Well, let's talk about April 6 here. Wow, this is something I wasn't even aware of this until just this week.

Craig 17:21
Of course, I was aware April 6 was coming people, okay. Don't give me a hard time about that. Because, you know, I gotta remember April 8, which is my anniversary, right? So I don't want to mess this up. April 6. Anyhow, I knew the 6th was coming. And it's certainly getting close. But this has to do with GPS systems. If you remember, 1999, if you were doing programming, if you were involved with computers back then, it was a scary time, many people kind of predicted the end of Western civilization. And they weren't totally wrong about that either. Western civilization could really have come to an end because of what was called the Y2K bug. And it was because of programmers like me, in the 70s and 60s that wrote software that said, Well, if I want to figure out the time between this date, and that date, all I have to do is use it two digit year, and those two-digit years, going to take up less space in the storage. And if you have a million records, times two more digits, which typically would be 2 bytes, then well, that's, you know, 2 million more bytes of data, which at the time was a whole lot of data. So we took shortcuts, and one of the shortcuts was storing the year as just the last two digits. So we didn't worry about the 19 part, we only worried about the 79 part or the 99 part. So there were a lot of predictions about software. And I knew a guy who started the company that was designing software to specifically look for this Y2K flaw and fix it. Of course, as it turned out, there were some problems, they were relatively minor. But most of the companies out there are certainly the ones that were in business realized that Y2K was coming and made some basic adjustments so that there wouldn't be a big problem. Many people expected, they're not to be another problem until maybe the year 10,000, right. So instead of Y2K, in the future, we're probably not going to be around. But in another 8000 years, we got another rollover. Well, that's not the case.

Craig 19:43
I have been aware of what's called the 2038 problem. Because in the Unix world, there's a timestamp the Network Time Protocol uses and many machines user, which means by the way, Windows uses us to synchronize times, well, that particular clock is going to roll over in the year 2038. And that's most likely to affect embedded systems. Now, there are fixes already in place, and many versions of Unix that are out there Linux and some of these other derivatives that are have already taken this into account. And then, of course, there's bad programmers that really don't realize all of the implications of what they do.

Craig 20:27
They've always existed and they'll always exist. In fact, I think in many ways, it's getting worse than it was before, you know, the bad programmers that is.

Craig 20:34
But maybe that's because I'm just getting to be an old man, right? been doing this for too long. So we know that the Y2K problem was real. And in most cases, it was fixed, that 2038 problem is real. Most cases it will be fixed, although again, we're going to be affecting embedded systems and most, In other words, those that don't get the software update one was alive last time you upgraded the software in your car, or some other physical device to clock on your disk. Hopefully, none of it's going to be life-threatening, because some systems are using Unix that is embedded systems. Well, there's another one, this is the April 6

Craig 21:18
bug. And this has to do with the GPS and there are some security experts, including one guy over at RSA. And RSA does a whole ton of security work. They provide some of the algorithms that run public key systems. They have little key fobs, little devices that have a timer on them, you've seen them before. It's a little number that rolls over every minute or so. And you might use them with your banks, etc. Well, those guys are the guys that are now warning about this April 6 problem. They talked about it at a security conference just last week out in San Francisco. And he says that some of the older GPS systems are going to be in serious trouble. Because the computers in these GPS systems are going to have counters that flip back to zero. So they are going to literally run out of time reaching the end of their counters. And that really could cause some major major effect. This guy here. Bill Maliki's there's another guy he's a VP over Trend Micro, they do a lot of computer security, cybersecurity. We've used some of their stuff in the past, he told the media that he would not be flying on April 6 and suggests that it could be bad, it could be a lot worse than Y2K was because the effects are going to be more widespread, widespread because many more systems have integrated GPS into their operations. And many of these are embedded systems ports. He's talking about here, loading unloading containers automatically, using GPS to guide the cranes. Some of those systems could be affected in the cranes are going to shut down. Hopefully, public safety systems use GPS traffic monitoring systems for bridges, the bridges that raise and lower automatically the ones that change the lanes ever been on one of those roads were part of the day. This lane is northbound. The other part it's southbound, you know, 20 years ago, these GPS systems were really important primitive shape, and they were embedded. So the impact on this could be even greater governments have issued warnings to state and private sectors to update their technology. But some of these systems we not, we're not even aware of how some of these work that companies have gone out of business, there's no way to get an update. Nobody really realizes their GPS in there. Because you remember, GPS isn't just used to locate you. GPS is used to locate because it uses very fancy high-resolution timers. And the way it works to locate you is it listens for the satellites to send a clock signal.

Craig 24:24
So each of the clocks will announce what time it is. And because the satellites are different distances from you, you will hear the time at different times. Right? You know, that if someone's yelling at you from across the room, have you here or you see a gunshot and range you will see the gunshot before you hear it. Right. Well, if someone fires that gun, right next to you, you're going to hear it instantly correct. So you know, that the the guy that fired the gun, and it took a second for that Soundwave to reach you, you know, that guy's further away than the guy who fired the gun. And immediately you heard it. Well, that's how GPS works using extremely high precision timers. So another thing people do with GPS signals is they use it to get a clock source. So many computers are using GPS receivers to figure out what time it is. So the systems are reverse traffic that controls bridges, etc, etc. Many of them are sinking their clocks and their timers up to GPS. And when it's an embedded system that hasn't been updated, we could have some serious serious problem couple of real quick things here before we go today. And of course, you'll find these articles and many more up on my website. http://CraigPeterson.com. I have also been doing a special podcast called It's A Security Thing, you're not going to find it unless you look for me because I haven't split it out yet. But in it, I'm talking about these types of security issues, things in the real world. This week. I was talking about a CPA firm what they did to respond to a cybersecurity event two weeks ago this happened, what they did right what they did wrong and you will find all kinds of these things are posting them almost daily. Now at my website, there's a special section, http://CraigPeterson.com. So make sure you have a look at it. We are writing all of these articles ourselves. These are not references to other articles. There might be links to other articles, but these are really great. If you're interested in cybersecurity and finding out more you'll find them on my home page again, http://CraigPeterson.com and it's all small businesses. It's all things that did right things that did wrong and what happened and they're all very, very current. So check it out. You really really should and wearing sending include some of those also in my weekly email. If you're not a subscriber /http://CraigPeterson.com/subscribe. Apple is crushing it on resale value in their laptops. But also the iPhones they destroy the Android iPhone X versus a Samsung Galaxy S9 Wow, iPhone X was 1000 bucks when it debuted, it's still worth 700 9 months later. So that's a drop of 30% the Samsung Galaxy S9 costs 720 but it was worth just $290 and drop 60%. So consider that too. When you're looking at the prices of devices what you should be mine and by the way, you should be buying the iPhone. Hey, have a great week. Make sure you check us out online. http://CraigPeterson.com. Take care everybody and we'll be chatting again next week. Bye-bye.

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Related articles:

'Gps Systems Will Be Struck By Y2K-Like Bug On April 6': Security Expert Says He Will Not Fly On 'Day Zero' After Governments Warn Global Devices Will Reset Due To Calendar Glitch

Google Recommends Windows 7 Users To Upgrade To Windows 10 If Possible, As A Kernel Vulnerability Allows For Local Privilege Escalation On The Operating System.


No Guns Or Lockpicks Needed To Steal Modern Cars If They're Fitted With Hackable 'Smart' Alarms

Sextortion Scammers Target Employees

Google Has Quietly Added Duckduckgo As A Search Engine Option For Chrome Users - Privacy

iPhone Crushes Androids On Resale Value

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More stories and tech updates at:

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Mar 15, 2019

It's Friday. Time for another Security thing. Today, Craig discusses sim hijacking, how to protect yourself from it by hardening your cell phone against these sim hijackers.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/15/2019

Sim Swaps - Hardening Your Cell Phone Against Sim Hijacks

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here with another Security Thing.

Craig 0:13
And this morning, we are going to be talking about a guy out again, this is also I think it's in California. Yes, it is California. And this happened just last month, in fact, sentencing March 14, 2019, and this is what's called sim jacking. And it's being used more and more. You know, we are conscious, many of us that our personal information is out there that we really should be keeping an eye on it. We really should be making sure that our personal information is protected. So what do we do? Well, we put new passwords up, user accounts. We're using 1Password, we're using Lastpass. But there is a big vulnerability for many people.

Craig 1:05
Some websites support two factor authentication, also known as 2FA, and that's a wonderful thing. But the problem is, many of them only support a type of two factor authentication that uses your cell phone to identify you. They send a text message and SMS message to identify you and who you are. So you will go on to the website and you'll enter your username, your password, and then it'll say, okay, we just sent a code to your cell phone. What's that code.

Craig 1:41
Now, there are much better ways of doing this with two factor authentication. We use USB keys, we use something called Duo on our phones.

Craig 1:51
So a special message comes through to our phone to an application on her phone that pops up, we have to authorize it. We have biometrics turned on as well, so that it's a lot safer. But we're handling other people's data, right, our customers data, then if you're handling customer data, or employee data, you should be doing something similar.

Craig 2:12
Well, in this case, Joel Ortiz was doing something known as a sim swap. And he was able to use to steal $5 million from people there at the school and elsewhere.

Craig 2:28
What he did is he stole the phone numbers of people that had cryptocurrency accounts.

Craig 2:39
How do you do that? Well, it's actually pretty simple. If people's accounts aren't set up properly, all you have to do is call the carrier, you know, AT&T, Verizon, T Mobile, whoever might be, called the carrier, pretend to be the person and do what's known as a port out, you know, how you can change your mobile phone company and still have the same phone number that is called porting your number and a port out is where you call your current provider and say, I'm moving my number out of your service and into another service that's a port out. So what he did is he had 40 victims.

Craig 3:24
He called up their phone companies and said, Hey, I'm moving to a new carrier, he provided the sim number for the new phone he wanted to port it to, and they, of course, just went ahead and move the phone number over for him. And you can do it quite simply, you don't have to change carriers, you can just say I have a new phone, I have a new SIM card and they will port your phone number to that new SIM card.

Craig 3:50
Then what the guy did is he went online to the crypto repository, if you will, where this Bitcoin is cryptocurrency was stored and he tried to log in, recover my password, they sent the reset to the phone number, which he had control over. And he used that to steal about $5 million in cryptocurrency.

Craig 4:15
So he's getting 10 years in prison, but it doesn't have to be cryptocurrency. This sim hijacking is being used for all kinds of fraud.

Craig 4:27
So here's what you need to do. To prevent this. First off, you need to harden your account with your mobile phone provider. Make sure you turn on something like a pin and that you have on your  account. AT&T lets you add a pass code to your account at AT&T. Verizon is now requiring every customer to have a pin or password as a primary authentication method. Because remember, they can call using your caller ID even before they do the port out. The SIM hijacking T Mobile has what they call a port validation feature. It's a pass code separate from the usual pass code. Sprint offers a separate pin you can use. So take a minute, do it right now call your cell phone provider directly.

Craig 5:20
Explain that you're worried about criminals taking over your phone number and ask about whatever kind of increased security they might have to protect your account. And then the second thing to do is never link your cell number to your online accounts. Now, I know in many cases, it's impossible not to. They require your cell number. I'm thinking about PayPal here right off the top of my head. And that's always bothered me. They don't have good two factor authentication. All these not that I could find going online. If you know about it, let me know. Send me a note in text me 855-385-5553 and let me know.

Craig 6:01
But take a minute remove your phone number from any account that could interest hackers. And you know, PayPal is one of those isn't it.

Craig 6:09
Use something like Google Voice which is a voice number that is sim hijack proof because there is no sim associated with it.

Craig 6:21
That's what I've gone to. I'm using a voip number for the verification number. So you obviously have to protect a number using unique password two factor authentication. Making sure doesn't expire if you don't use it regularly. But there are a lot of steps that you can take a look at your Gmail, Microsoft, Apple, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and Amazon account. Anything else that you have, go into your security settings, and try and use something like Google Authenticator or do oh as I mentioned do Oh, do you Oh, is something that we use here for my business to protect our information and our customers in formation and if you'd like to know more, let me know maybe we'll put together a master class for you guys little free class but you gotta let me know if this is something you think I should do 855-385-5553

Craig 7:14
Just text me right there and let me know or just email me@CraigPeterson.com. Let me know that you'd be interested in learning more maybe some step by step to stop sim hijacking on your accounts. All right. Take care of the body. We will be back tomorrow with a full radio show my half hour show the turd on terrestrial radio in New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, and also Massachusetts.

Craig 7:44
So take care and of course it's here on podcasts as well. Bye bye.

---

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Mar 14, 2019

It's time for another It's a Security Thing. Today, Craig talks about the malware attack on the office of CPAs Martin Hutchison and Hohman.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

---

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/14/2019

Martin Hutchison And Hohman CPA - Missed The Signs And Got Hacked

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey everybody. Craig Peterson here. We got another little security thing. It's a security thing for you and man alive. This is something I've seen happening more and more. We've got warnings out from the federal government about this scam. This is a scam. I know personally, a lot of people have gotten nailed for. I have a letter sitting in front of me from some Certified Public Accountants. It's Martin Hutchinson and Hohman and it is a firm out of Eureka, California. Yeah, a they released, I'm glad they did this in California, it is required by law. And that's true in many states. In fact, the module and I'm just finishing up right now in my security course that I've been writing and delivering. We talk specifically about all of these different rules and regulations. There's 47 different sets of them on the state level in the US. But this is from their notice of data breach, and it goes on this letter goes on for about two page I am pages. I am not going to read this whole thing to you. But I'd be glad to send it to you if you're interested. But here's what happened to them.

Craig 1:27
February 15, 2019, while trying to resolve an email failure. With our email host Suddenlink I was directed to a website that gave a phone number to call for immediate assistance. When I call this number, the technician stated, he could certainly help he requested access to my computer to understand the issue with the email. So so far, we're talking about having an email problem. How many times have we seen this people, email problems happen all the time. But I pick up more hands because they're having an email problem. So he had email this company sudden link and then he was directed to this website. So he calls them up. So next up here, he requested access to my computer to understand the issue with the email after I installed the software necessary to give him remote access to my computer, he pulled up some IP addresses on my computer screen and stated that this was the reason for the email failure. I should point out, this is a very, very common tactic, they'll usually drop down into a shell, they'll get a net stat, they'll show the interfaces on your computer. And this is far beyond even that little thing far beyond what most people understand. But it's enough to really give them a little bit of a leg up. So this guy pulled up some IP addresses. He then insisted that in order to fix the problem and prevent viruses from attacking, I would need to allow him to install a program on our office's network server, I told him no, and at that our local computer technician would be contacted to deal with this. Now, again, we see this all of the time, most of these local computer guys are not able to handle some of these bigger problems. But I gotta tell you, I was impressed with what happened and what his local computer guy did. At this point. He stated that back to the letter that only a Microsoft tech such as himself would be able to do this, this was a red flag is I thought I was dealing with this Suddenlink technician. At that point, I quickly disconnected my computer from the internet. And from our office network. I then uninstalled the remote access software, I had allowed him to install and turn the computer off. This entire interaction lasted less than eight minutes. So here we go. Martin Hutchinson and Hohman, certified public accountants, Eureka, California, and they are admitting to what happened. Now, he did do the right things here, things were a little suspicious, he thought it was sudden link. So his first mistake was calling the phone number that was listed on the website that the email directed him to what he should have done is he knows he's getting his email through Suddenlink, he should have called them up directly, look up their website, call that number and make sure he talked to somebody he knows a name, he recognizes over there in Suddenlink Okay, that makes sense. So that was his very first mistake. So now he's on with this guy. And this guy asked him to install some remote access software. If you're dealing with us as a managed security services provider, we already have software installed on your machines that allow us to monitor the security to look into problems. So if you're on the phone with them, and they say, Hey, we need to install some software, there's your next alarm, don't allow them to install software. They should have whatever's needed on your machine already. Now, you might need to enable it, it should be, you know, a little pop up and say, Hey, so and so's requesting access our software when we request access pops up and says that so and so from mainstream is taking control of the computer. So it comes up on the screen, it stays on the screen. We can't get rid of that message. You can't get rid of that message. You know, we're on with you at that point. Okay, so there, there was his next little alarm bells should have gotten off. Now he did have one go off because he did realize that Microsoft technician such as himself, this was Suddenlink but you know, Microsoft does do some certain certifications. And maybe that's what the guys referring to but shutting it all off made a whole lot of sense. So he unplugged the network cables in his computer. Nowadays, a lot of these computers are hooked up to Wi Fi, which is a bad idea, by the way for businesses. But he pulled those computers out there absolute right thing to do. He tried to install the software. My last module that I put together and teaching talks about security breaches, he should not have done that he should have immediately hit the power button and then disconnect the cables and set the machine aside for a professional cyber forensics person to have a look at this because there who knows what happened, right? There could be a lot of things that happen that could have had data exfiltration, this might be something that the FBI or local law enforcement is interested in, you need to preserve the state of the machines, that was another mistake that he made. And then the technician came out and the technician told them, Hey, this is a known scam. And the technician ended up replacing the hard disk in the machine because he said, this was a very sophisticated piece of malware that had been installed on the machine.

So there you go. It's a security thing, a lot of stuff you should know and do. And again, these CPA guys, they did a decent job. They missed a whole bunch of red flags. they handled the post hack if you will post attack incorrectly. His computer guy handled it incorrectly. But now you know better don't you you know a little bit more about what to do. So that's today's security thing. I'm Craig Peterson. You can find me online. http://CraigPeterson.com. And make sure you subscribe to the newsletter to stay on top of this stuff. And this podcast. And you can get the podcast by going to http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. Hey, have a great day. We'll be back with another security thing.

Craig 8:03
There's always something to talk about. I just don't always have the time take care. Bye bye.

---

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Mar 13, 2019

Craig is on the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. Joe Reagan sitting in for Ken this morning. They talked about the new cameras that can spot a shoplifter even before the steal something. They also discussed autonomous cars and their impact and risks.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

These Cameras Can Spot Shoplifters Even Before They Steal

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Self-Driving Cars Might Kill Auto Insurance As We Know It
---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/13/2019

Artificial Intelligence Our Safety And Privacy

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning everybody. Craig Peterson here on this morning with WGAN. Ken was out. So we had Joe Reagan in this morning along with Matt and we had a little bit of chat about a couple of things. The new AI stuff, Joe had some interesting points today. I enjoyed having him on. But AI and what does it mean to us when from soup to nuts here shopping, police, our cars, etc. so here we go with the guys over at Maine's number one morning show.

Matt Gagnon 0:36
And we're back again. 7:37 on the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. Joe Reagan is in for Ken today and Craig Peterson is on the line with us as he would be typically on 7:38 on a Wednesday. So Craig, are you this morning?

Craig 0:50
Hey, I'm doing good, Matt. What? 737 once you just leave it alone. Come on, guys.

Matt 0:55
Sorry. I know. A little early this time. So anyway, let's start with our technology topics. Of course. As always, sir, I think the first one I'd like to deal with frankly, is is cameras, right. Spotting shoplifters before they even steal. So basically, we're talking about what Minority Report here they get, like future future crimes, pre cognition. The cameras are basically I assumed, you know, keeping tabs on people and can predict when they're gonna steal what's happening here?

Craig 1:26
Yeah, this is part of an overall trend that we've been seeing over the last year or two. We have had in London, of course, we know right, it's the most surveilled city in the world. They are tracking you everywhere you go. They're using facial recognition. And they are using it also to listen listen for bullets been fired, we have that New York City as well. They know instantly when a gun is fired, where was fired, we have now software that's being used by many every major city in the Western world now, that is predicting where crimes are going to be taking place. And in all of these cases, it's kind of ok, still, right? Because basically, if there's an area of the tide crime, you want the police there, right. And it's kind of a normal thing. Now, we also have California doing yet another wacky thing, which is instead of having to go in front of a some form of a magistrate or judge to get bail, and then you post bail, and you can get out assuming you're not a big risk to the community or flight risk. California has decided that they want to get rid of bail bondsmen entirely. And they just want a computer program to decide who gets to get out on on basically on bail. And it's it's really concerning now, as we give more and more power to computer systems which just aren't fallible, if he wants to any Wi Fi show, right. You know, that's true.

Matt 3:07
Bad idea.

Joe Reagan 3:07
And then great. You know, one thing that's come up a couple times is that when you talk about how these computer algorithms are doing this, so we talked about predictive analysis for shoplifters. A lot of that is based on correlation. And so therefore, one of the critiques of the systems is that it will it actually is discriminatory against usually racial minorities that might be at a statistically more, you know, our might be punished by criminal by crime more often. And so, it's, it's, it seems like it almost turns itself into a, I guess, a self licking ice cream cone, where it's just, you're just making it worse for people. And it's not actually doing predictive analysis in terms of someone's intentions, but actually trying to make judgments based off of past events. 

Matt 3:51
I would like to see a self licking ice cream cone. I would be quite...

Craig 3:56
Joe, you brought up a really good point. Do you remember Microsoft came out with this little Twitter bot that they had designed to use machine learning

Joe 4:09
How can I forget? Like yesterday. Yeah.

Craig 4:11 
Yeah, you remember this thing? And what it did was.

Matt 4:13
Yeah. Turned into Skynet in like 10 minutes. 

Craig 4:18
Exactly. They had it monitor all these Twitter feeds. And what did it come back as it came back to as a nasty racist, and it was it was just crazy. Well, and your point about, you know, predictive correlation, etc. is a good one, too, because when you start looking at this in what Matt brought up here was this Japanese startup called Vaak that takes security camera footage and does predictions. So you take this and say, well, is this computer system going to turn into a racist like Microsoft computer system did because it notices that most of these crimes are committed by people who have black hoodies on that are covering the faces of black hoodies. And from a cultural standpoint, that particular type of dress is, is a minority is, is wearing that type of a dress. So now all of a sudden, the system that's supposed to be looking for general body language, general trends is now looking at someone that walks in that's dressed a certain way and automatically, bam, it's accusing them of being potential shoplifters. Now, today, what Bloomberg is reporting is this system is being designed. So that is alert security and security goes over and asks the shopper, hey, do you need some help? And that alone is enough for most cases for them to stop the potential shoplifting that might happen, which is a big deal guys. We're talking about $34 billion in retail shrinkage. It's a biggest source, in fact, to shrink. And so it's a very big deal. But my gosh, where's this all going? We get more and more of this. And we're not anywhere near artificial intelligence yet everybody. And what's going to happen everything so far as Matt pointed out is basically turned into Skynet.

Matt 6:20
Yeah, absolutely. We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru who joins us at this time to go over what's happening in the world of technology Okay, so another one that attracted my attention on our news list here today is the potential future in which cops can take over my self driving car obviously self driving cars are inevitable you can be terrified of it if you want to listener who's listening to this right now, but it's coming and you're gonna have to get ready for it. So when you finally are forced to drive your self-driving car when you get pulled over the cops can just like take over your car man. What's what's what's happening here. The is this like, be going to be like some sort of stealthy thing bill into all new cars. You think?

Craig 7:02
Well, that's kind of where we're going right now. And you look at what happened a couple of weeks ago, in Hawaii, there was a big conference out there. And they were talking about ethics and the ethics of artificial intelligence. And one of the things they brought up was our, you know, home devices like our Alexas, our Google Home devices, etc. Should have built into them some artificial intelligence that automatically calls the police if it detects something that that just might not be a great home environment, right. As always can figure that out. We already have these really cool things that reminds me of the Fast and the Furious, these remote control little little cars that the police can use. And they drive them underneath the car of a flame suspect. And they set off a small electromagnetic pulse which disabled the engine because of course, all these new engines have computers in them. Have you seen these things?

Matt and Joe 8:09 
Yeah, yep.

Craig 8:10
Yeah, little RC cars, and they'll do 80 miles an hour. So in that case, obviously they're damaging the cars. They just burned out the computers. And now we have people who are driving a semi autonomous cars, for instance, the Teslas and there's a lot of Teslas on the road here in Maine. And they have this kind of semi-auto pilot thing. And the idea is you can have it kind of take over the steering wheel. And while you're on the highway, it'll stay in the lanes. It'll drive down the road. And if the cars in front of you slow down, it'll slow down. It really kind of makes you a really good patron of the roads is the idea and Elon Musk has announced that come next year, he's going to have a software upgrade for the Teslas that makes them 100% autonomous. But in case now we have a couple that we know of, we have drivers that have fallen asleep. And this one case the driver as reported by Bloomberg in December last year was drunk. Fell sound asleep behind the wheel of his Tesla. His auto pilot was engaged and the police were chasing them down the freeway. I'm not sure exactly what they noticed, probably a sleeping driver. Might be something that's worth noting. And they will try to get this car to stop it couldn't wake up the the so called driver, the occupants of the vehicle and so they ended up having to box the car in. They had, you know, you get four police officers, the car has to slow down because the cars around it or slowing down came to a stop. So what do you do. The police are suggesting and Bloomberg's suggesting that maybe what should happen here is the the cops should be able to not only have the car pull over to the side of the road and stop, but they're talking about rerouting cars, as well as been able to force them to pull over. So I don't know, Matt, maybe when you're driving that car down the road, the police will just do that. Let's say Hey, take you right to the local police station. And because you're under arrest and all the doors locked.

Matt 10:24
So you're suggesting to me that is that the whole OJ chase thing in 1991 or whatever is the thing of the past. We'll never see that again.

Craig 10:31
Yeah, exactly. When was the last night you fell drunk on the road?

Joe  10:36
Well, you know that reason is your question because whether you're talking about a vehicle that is fully autonomous or partially autonomous, it raises questions, and this is one of the insurance industry has dealt with for some time is how do you deal with damage that's incurred from mechanical issues, whether that be a computer glitch, or some sort of actual mechanical glitch where the operator may or may not be 100% responsible for something that's happens, I get it soon. This is really changing the dynamic of of how the insurance companies using auto insurance,

Craig 11:06
it will in this case, when you're talking about that, Joe, you were talking about 90% of the risk, because right now, 90% of the accidents when they've been been investigated afterwards were attributed to some form of human error. So if you get rid of that 90%, if it's no longer the human who's driving who is causing the accident, or at least a large contributor to the accident, where does that liability go? Because, again, human or you know, involvement here, right? Human risk from the driver? Well, there are humans and I'm assuming I, you know, I got a little implication for what you're saying. I'm assuming that you're also including the humans that wrote to the software. You know, they don't go after the guy that designed the switch that failed on the car. And that caused, you know, I just contributing to an accident. They don't do that nowadays, right? They might go after the manufacturer, they might try and get a recall on the car, get that switch replaced, get that switch repaired. But that guy that misdesigned the switch doesn't go to jail doesn't face criminal charges. What's the future going to hold when now we don't even have most of these car companies making their own software, Apple got rid of their autonomous vehicle division, at least the guys that were going to make the cars and they've decided they're going to make the software so they're not going to make all of the software there's already dozens of computers in modern cars. There's a lot of different software, a lot of different companies. Joe, my gosh, your head's going to explode when you get right down to it and think about where does a liability go? Who has to get insured? How long is this stuff going to get tied up in the courts and you know, Washington DC in state courts and and legislatures. This is this is the hugest part of this huge new problem we're going to be facing with autonomous vehicles. All right.

Matt 13:16
Craig Peterson, our tech guru joins us at this time to go over the world of technology every Wednesday and today is no exception. Craig appreciate it as always, and we will talk to you again next week.

Craig 13:26
Hey gentlemen, take care.

---

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Mar 12, 2019

Craig is on the Jim Polito show with Danny Farrantino filling in for Jim. They talked about the AI, artificial intelligence, that the government is using to track and determine would be criminals, the risks of it, and President Trump not renewing the NSA surveillance program.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

National Security Agency Halts Surveillance Program Because Trump Won’t Renew It

These Cameras Can Spot Shoplifters Even Before They Steal
--- 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/12/2019

Risks Of Government Controlled Artificial Intelligence

Craig Peterson: 0:00
Hey guys, Craig Peterson here. Hope you're having a great morning. This morning, I got to talk on the Jim Poliito show with Danny, the producer, because Jim is overseas. He's touring around Italy and France and a few other places, send it in little daily reports. But we talked this morning about the dangers of these new artificial intelligence systems being used by government and now being used by police department in California by the guys that used to be able to set bail and whether you get out on bail. And retailers to kind of save them a few bucks, in fact, billions of dollars by stopping shoplifting. So here we go with Danny.

Danny Farrantino 0:49
Who knows what that music means? It means it's time to get a little techie. And National Security Agency, the NSA, it appears Craig may be stopping some of these surveillance programs they've been doing over the past few years.

Craig 1:05
Yeah, this is a really interesting thing. And by the way, you know, Jim's over there. And obviously he's looking to see what are the people thinking in Italy and France? And what did they think of Americans, as you just mentioned, and I'm not sure that anyone's really thought this through. Because if somehow we're thinking that Jim is a good representation of your average American, there might be an issue there, Danny.

Danny 1:36
Well, unfortunately, my producer Steve out in Western Mass, told them all he needed to know was Prego, so he texted us this morning. And everyone in Rome thinks he's pregnant. He doesn't know what's going on.

Craig 1:51
Anthony. Alright sounds good. Well let's about the NSA program because this is astounding. It is not being covered in the general news out there. But it is a very, very big deal because the National Security Agency has been tracking Americans for years and years. That program was substantially increased during the Obama administration. And there were spying on every communication we had. They were collecting metadata, and they could use that to figure out where you were, basically figure out who you were, who you were talking to, they were recording calls, etc, etc. So President Trump comes into office, and all of a sudden the NSA decides what they've been doing might have been illegal. And so illegal in fact that some of these records that they knew they had collected that were way outside what the law allowed for. They deleted so they deleted like three years worth of data collection. Well, now, here we are, in 2019, this program, which was authorized under the so called USA Freedom Act, I love it, how they name some of these terrible acts like they're they're just wonderful patriotic things. But anyways.

Danny 3:12 
It's for the people, Craig.

Craig 3:14 
It is for the people. It requires reauthorization of the end of this year. And apparently what's happened is the NSA has decided that since President Trump doesn't like this program, and he doesn't like Americans being spied on illegally, that he is not going to renew this program. Now, this is this whole program that we found out because of the so called whistleblower and all of the data that he had released and very scary thing. But we found out about this and that the NSA is apparently going to dish this whole program, which they apparently have not had a single conviction because of this program. And we're talking hundreds of millions of dollars and actually, they were collecting so much data. Danny that in drove up the price of hard disks.

Danny 4:12 
Because they were taking them all. Wow.

Craig 4:13
Yeah, because they were taking them absolutely. So we found out about this from a guy named Luke Murray. He's a national security adviser to the House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. So in other words, we found out about this program going away. We found out that President Trump didn't like it that it probably wasn't going to be reauthorized from an assistant here to the House Minority Leader it's it's fascinating all the way around. Obviously the democrats have something to do with this as well because they may not pass it through the house President Trump doesn't like it he's already had a lot of this stuff shut down. Thank goodness they are finally starting to pay attention to what we the people want which has to be free in our communications in our papers to have privacy. You know we can give it up all we want to go to Amazon and Google and Facebook but that's us given it up it isn't our government spying on us?

Danny 5:15
Yeah, you know, some people making the argument well, if you're not doing anything wrong, who cares? But it's just kind of the general principle and then not only that, Craig but as you say, if they've had zero convictions with all of this data they've collected what what good has it done?

Craig 5:28
Yeah, it really hasn't done any good and when it gets down to that argument of well if you have nothing to hide but take a look at what's happened with the Mueller investigation where Muller excuse me investigation was thinking Bueller right Ferris Bueller. But with a smaller investigation where they were not investigating a crime they were investigating people and that's the sort of thing that happens in socialist governments if we know fascist, communist all versions of socialist I'm where you are investigated. And as has been said, show me the person I'll show you the crime. So if they if the government has all of this information, and with the hundreds of thousands of pages of rules, regulations, laws on the federal level, my goodness, the last half of the last year of the Obama administration we're talking about 50,000 new pages of regulations. We you know, my wife was a police officer and she said in the academy, she was a state trooper, in the academy they were told before you leave your home in the morning the on average you violated two to three laws having all of this just makes it so they can strong arm anyone and convict anyone of anything and that to me, that's just very scary.

Danny 6:50
Well, it brings up a point of you saying the government watching and me trying to find crimes or whatever else moving over to Japan. Now Japan trying to solve crimes before they even take place.

Craig 7:01
Yeah, this is a you know, something that we were warned about. Right. It's been a theme of, of our science fiction movies for many many years, you know, pre-crime with a Tom Cruise movie and many others that are out there but this is a whole new type of technology. We know that in in socialist China that they're monitoring everybody they've got cameras everywhere. They've now got this whole social credit thing. And if you say something negative against the government if you jaywalk, they're monitoring you. They know who you are, and they're taking away your right to travel because of what you say, if you're not politically correct. In China, you can even get on an airplane over there. It's really gotten bad. We're now looking at pre-crime in the US where we have  computer programs that have been analyzing all of our violent crime patterns. And the police are are sending police officers excuse me and investigatory teams into areas where the computers are saying, there's likely to be a crime here. I have real problems with that because, again, it's a computer. But I have even more problems, Danny, when in California, they're trying to get rid of bail bondsmen and in fact, they're trying to get rid of bail entirely. And what they're doing in California is they said, well, we've got a computer program and we'll just feed in all of the data about you. We'll feed in your social network comments. We'll feed in your travel history. We'll feed in your criminal history, and then the computer is going to come up and decide whether or not we should release you.

Danny 8:58
Oh, that sounds like a smart idea.

Craig 9:00
Isn't that brilliant? Now, how can you challenge that? You know, the computer program was written by programmers, are you going to be able to hold them into court? Are you going to be below examine every line of code? In fact, the people that wrote the programs are saying no, you can't have access to our source code, its proprietary. So now you're going to be judged by a piece of computer software that you cannot bring into court. You know, you can challenge a traffic ticket, but you can't challenge this in California. And now what you're talking about, I think in in Japan is this cameras being tied into yet another computer program. And these cameras are deciding whether or not they think to look shifty. Whether they think that you might be a shoplifter. So there they can tie into pretty much any computer or excuse me, any security system that's out there, and this software, it's a kind of a machine learning, AI and it's, again, out of Minority Report. And what they're saying is that retailers in the US and UK are, are are losing money, right, though they're losing about $34 billion a year in lost sales because of shoplifting. It accounts for about 2% of revenue. So in an industry where the margins are quite thin, it could save them a whole bunch of money. And so they're turning to this computer program that's going to watch you and decide whether or not it thinks you might be a shoplifter. Now, right now, they're saying the right way to do it is if it's if it's identifying someone that's looking around that that seems to have some body language that might indicate that they're shoplifter, they're saying, well, just send security over and ask that person if they need any help. And almost all always just having that person realize that they're being watched is enough for them not to shoplift. But what's the next step? You know, Danny, it's one thing to have socialist countries monitoring us. As President Trump pointed out, we're not a socialist country, well, at least he has, right? And having these technologies in place just makes it easy, that easy for the government to do things that take it to the next level of private business. Again, it's one thing for them to monitor you to warn you, but this is really getting me more and more concerned. When should computers be monitoring us? And what should they be doing? I don't mind them monitoring me for symptoms of a heart attack, because I'm wearing an Apple Watch and it might save my life. But the rest of this I'm I just don't like.

Danny 1:55
Especially when a lot of it is I guess, per se, at least an Apple Watch that's giving you a hard target data where something like this machine in Japan is we think maybe might be you might be guilty.

Craig 12:08
Yeah, or the software they're using a New York City to pre-place the police officers are in California to decide whether or not you might be a flight risk. It's we're going that way, Danny, it's going to be happening more and more. You got to bet that the legislature right here in the Commonwealth is looking at something like this pretty seriously as a way to save money and and track people maybe stop crime. I don't know where do we draw that line?

Danny 12:37
Unfortunately, you know, you want to keep people safe. But you also want to give people their own personal personal space as well. So and unfortunately, that line is very thin as you say Craig. Craig as always great stuff. Of course, we only got to about half of it. People want to hear more. What do they do?

Craig 12:52
All right, everybody. I am back to working on content here delivering on this huge course on cyber security, DIY cyber security. Anyways, take care. Have a great day. Bye bye.

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Mar 11, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath talking about the recent autonomous plane crashes. They also talked about autonomous cars and the NSA Surveillance Program.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

National Security Agency Halts Surveillance Program Because Trump Won’t Renew It

Self-Driving Cars Might Kill Auto Insurance As We Know It
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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/11/2019

Autonomous Planes 737 Crash - NSA Surveillance Program

Craig Peterson 0:00
Good morning, everybody. It's another Monday an early Monday, I wish they would get rid of Daylight Savings Time, there has been a move in the northeast US to not only abolish Daylight Savings Time here, which again, there's all kinds of studies that show that it's bad for your health, this whole Daylight Savings Time shifting an hour here and there. Not a good thing. But turning that off, but also changing to a new time zone, creating one more time zone east of Eastern Time, which would put us in maritime time, which I am so for as well. And Maine and New Hampshire have alternately pass bills. But all the New England states are kind of relying on each other, because Maine won't it if Mass. doesn't do it or if New Hampshire doesn't do it, and you know, vice versa, typical political mess. And the only reason we have the time zones we have is because of the railroad and they decided to chop the country up to make their life a little bit easier to schedule the trains over 100 years ago. And then Congress fell in step and decided to adopt these time zones. It used to be that noon was it varied from city to city, and it was based on when your actual noon was based on the sun being directly overhead. So we had thousands of time zones across the country just too much for the railroad, too much for the federal government to handle. So that's where we got it from completely arbitrary. I would love for it to make way more sense. And if you look at even productivity numbers, the people's productivity based on where they live within a time zone, if they're on the eastern edge of the western edge, or in this sentence, and health impacts. It's huge. We've got to re examine this and we've got to get rid of the shifts in the time zone. That's just my opinion here. But heck, that's what you're here for. Right. We are going to go now to Mr. Jack Heath. Of course, talking with me, Craig Peterson about a couple of things. One, this new 737 crash that occurred in Ethiopia, what is happening with our jets? What are the technical concerns from my viewpoint on this, we also had a couple of minutes to talk about autonomous vehicles tying that into the airplanes and some credit the President Trump just does not getting over this National Security Agency data collection program. So here we go with Mr. Jack.

Jack Heath 2:52
Craig Peterso, our Tech Talk guy joins us on the Auto Fair listener lines. Good morning, Craig.

Craig 2:57
Hey, good morning, Jack. You know, look, this Boeing 737 Max 8 crash. It's kind of interesting in getting into the background of it, because these two crashes or they're looking into whether or not it was some faulty sensor data. Both of these planes crashed shortly after takeoff. And it brings up something that I've been concerned about for many years. And it really was me started with the Airbus planes where we have a heavy, heavy reliance on automation and was automation at least partly to blame because of bad sensors? So it looks like that's what the crash investigators are starting to look into right now. But that goes right back to us or automobiles. We've got these new self driving cars. We've got Elon Musk, saying that within the next year is Teslas are going to be upgradeable to be completely self driving and that brings up questions about the insurance market, insurance people. Who are they going to ensure?Is it the guys that wrote the software? The company they work for? The contractor that hired them? The companies that made the car which isn't really making the car anymore they're being assembled? We've got police now who are looking at maybe being able to take control of self driving cars. We have at least two cases now jack where drivers have fallen asleep behind those steering wheel with Tesla including one just a month ago with the autopilot engaged. There's so many questions eh?

Jack 4:33
I don't want a, did you just say eh? Did you hear the Canadian in Craig Peterson right there. He said, eh. Wow, eh? I was just saying I don't want Justin McIsaac having a driverless car.

Craig 4:49
Well, the way I look at it, Jack, in 20 years, you know, if you're 70, 80 years old, it's probably going to be safer to have an autonomous vehicle than having you drive the today it might be safer to have the autonomous vehicle than having Justin drive the car as you pointed out. But ultimately, ultimately, this is where it's going. And this is where the airplanes are going.

Jack 5:13
It's not me I'm worried about when I'm driving.

Craig 5:15 
Yeah, Justin, I know. I get it.

Jack 5:17 
No, no it's the other car though.

Craig 5:19 
It's Justin. Yeah.

Jack 5:20
He's no, he's a very, he's a very conscious driver. It's what he's what he does. But it's not his car that worries me.

Justin McIsaac 5:26 
I  can use the Apple and driving sometimes. Believe me, I can't wait for this.

Craig 5:32
It's going to be an interesting but a very rough road for the next few years. And the President Trump's administration is not getting much credit for the next thing here, which is, you know, this whole controversial NSA National Security Agency program that was scooping up data on all kinds of Americans, you know, domestic phone records and all Well, what's interesting to me on this is, of course, it was a whistleblower that let us know what the federal government was doing and monitoring us tracking us, etc. President Trump came into office, all of a sudden the NSA decided to destroy years worth of data. It had been collected on Americans because they admitted that some of it was illegal. Well, now that program is up for renewal. And they are concerned that President Trump is not going to renew it, because apparently that's what he's been saying. So we got word from a congressional aide. Now the National Security Agency has stopped their surveillance program, the monitoring all of us Americans, and also apparently this program has not yielded the arrest of even a single person. Although it's probably cost us more than a billion dollars plus our privacy. So interesting, interesting day this morning, Jack

Jack 7:00
All right, Craig. Thanks. Good stuff, eh? I appreciate it. Craig Peterson with an O-N. Thank you, Craig.

Craig 7:05
Take care.

Craig 7:06
Hey, I really enjoy doing these. I get up early I obviously have to do a lot of preparation. I send it off to the radio station so that they have an idea of what I've prepared and have some ideas of what t talk about. It's kind of tough if you're hosting a three four hour show every day. I've done it before and it can be tough.

Anyhow if you appreciate this and all of the work that I'm doing and bullied into this let me know it is truly a labor of love make sure you subscribe as well if you enjoy this because that helps other people find us. Go to http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. Hopefully I've earned a five star review from you. Please leave one if I have. And you can do that again http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes and hit subscribe if you would. I'd appreciate it. Take care. Have a great day. We'll be back tomorrow.

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Mar 9, 2019

Should police have the ability to control your car? We're going to talk about automakers are talking about giving police control over your car.

Pay with cash? Not in Britain. Britain and some other European countries are moving towards a cashless society. What does it mean?

Remote skimming of your Credit Cards. The Secret Service is warning about High Tech Thieves using this tactic.

Auto insurance and Autonomous Vehicles. We'll be talking about that and what's happening with auto insurance when it comes to these new self-driving cars.

Ransomware what's happened to it, why don't we heard as much about it anymore.

The National Security Agency, NSA, halted that surveillance program. We will be talking about that they had that surveillance program that Edward Snowden really got in trouble for.

Cameras that watch for prospective shoplifters? Yes, cameras with AI software designed specifically to spot shoplifters even before they steal.

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/09/2019

Trump Halts NSA Surveillance Program - AI Spotting Shoplifters - Autonomous Vehicles Police And Insurance

Craig Peterson: 0:00 
Hey, it's that music must mean it is time for me to get going. Good morning everybody. Everyone who's tuning in on the radio, listening on the iHeart app or even listening to the podcast. It's a lot of fun. I'm honored to be here every week and I get so many great comments from people thanking me for everything I do and I do try hard as they say, right Avis - we try harder. I try hard to get you all of the information you need to know and help you out. From putting on those master classes for you and trying to do all of this stuff without the sponsorship, that personally I kind of find a little bit annoying but you know that's the price right? You have to pay for the time on the air etc., etc. So I'll

Anyhow, you are tuned in for the half hour we have today. We're going to talk about automakers here giving police control over your car. What's happening with that. Britain and some other European countries are moving towards a cashless society. How about ours? What does it mean? We get another warning out from the Secret Service about high tech thieves, and how they're doing remote skimming now of your credit cards.

Auto insurance. This came up this week I was chatting with someone. So, I found a really great article on Bloomberg that I shared on my website. We'll be talking about that and what's happening with auto insurance when it comes to these new self-driving cars. Yes, indeed, this is going to be a very big deal especially for those smaller insurance guys who are out there. Ransomware what's happening what's happened to it, why don't we heard as much about it anymore. The National Security Agency

NSA, they have halted that surveillance program. We will be talking about that they had that surveillance program that Edward Snowden really got in trouble for. These cameras are designed to spot shoplifters even before they steal. And the whole concept of artificial intelligence came up this week as well when I was chatting with a couple of different radio stations and also a little bit on my show last week. So, let's get started with that. The NSA, we know that they threw a huge net out there, they were doing bulk data collection on U.S. domestic phone records. It was abused apparently by the feds multiple times. It looks like the Obama administration might have abused it as well. And under the so-called USA Freedom Act, which was put in place by the way to replace the act that had been in effect since 911.

So, the USA Freedom Act. It requires reauthorization at the end of the year, and President Trump is saying that he doesn't want to extend it. Isn't it interesting how the tables have turned? You know, we've had the Democrats screaming about privacy, about all of these things for so many years. And now it's come out that of course, they are the party of no free speech. Just try and say something against them, see what happens to you. We just had had a case of a guy on campus out at UC Berkeley, getting just cold-cocked right in the face because of his exercise of free speech. And when it comes to free speech, of course, now the Democrats are introducing a law that would put in place an old FCC rule that they had under the Obama administration that actually hurt the development of the internet. Well, I'm sure I'll end up talking about that in a future show as well.

But President Trump apparently is not looking to extend it. Not at all. That's according to Luke Murray and he's the National Security Advisor. And what's interesting too, is he's a security adviser to the Minority Leader, Kevin McCarthy.

Now, this didn't come out of the White House. So, who knows exactly what's going to happen. But the New York Times is reporting on this. CNN is reporting on this and if the left is reporting on it. Well, I guess they want it in place, right. They want to be able to monitor their opponents, their so-called enemies. Well, the NSA last year disclosed it had found technical problems with the program that led to the collection of records on U.S. persons didn't have the authority to collect while da they were collecting absolutely everything. Remember, they said, oh, we're just collecting phone metadata doesn't really matter. It's not a big deal. And then it turned out well, yes, metadata, in fact, can be used to figure out who you are who you're talking to.

Where you were, track you around, okay. Very, very big deal to collect that metadata. Well, according to Murray, he said that the administration actually hasn't been using it for the past six months because of problems in which way the information was collected. You remember last year and reported late last year in 2018, that the NSA had destroyed volumes, just tons of the data they had been collecting under the order. Of course, the new Trump administration because you can't monitor people, right? We're supposed to be safe. We're supposed to have privacy in our papers and our persons. It's just crazy how far it's gone. He said, it possibly is collecting information on US citizens the way it was transferred from private companies to the administration after they got to FISA court approval. And we know there have been some serious issues with the FISA court approvals based on what we're starting to hear about the FISA court warrants.

And you know me I've been against these all of the time I've called them star-chamber proceedings because there's there's no way to defend yourself. Now it's not quite the same as a grand jury we're obviously you can't defend yourself in a grand jury, either, right and the grand jury You know the old statement that you can indict a ham sandwich with the grand jury. Absolutely true. But when it comes to the grand jury, now it starts the whole legal process and it starts out in the open with the FISA court everything is top secret which is what? It's an absolute probability that we are going to get some abuses of the system, right? Is it that the way that always ends up going so Murray also noted that reauthorizing the program would be challenging he says I'm not actually certainly administration will want to start that the back up where they've been the last six months in other words

The Trump administration came in saw the abuses that were occurring, saw the problems with the data and stopped the program. They destroyed a lot of the data that was illegally collected on US citizens, US persons. And they have not been using the data. And you remember testimony on this whole thing from the National Security director in front of Congress saying that they had not indicted a single person. Had not made a single arrest because of the data that had been collected in this program. And yet, there's so much data being collected and stored that it actually drove up the price of hard disks in the United States. Because all of this data was being collected and stored there, most of it in Utah at the point of the mountain. The whole thing is just nuts. You know, anyways, you get me going here on a Saturday morning. Let's move on to another topic here that's going to get me going when it comes to shoplifters and AI

Well, you know, artificial intelligence, AI, what it's all about. There's a great article in Bloomberg, you'll find on my website.

Okay. It's from Bloomberg. And it's talking about this Japanese startup called VAAK. VAAK has developed what they're calling artificial intelligence software. And this software is designed to look at people to watch the footage. And from that footage, try to hunt for potential shoplifters. We've talked before about some of the programs that are in place, a software that's being used by police departments here in the US and around the world. And the software that is trying to predict where crime is going to occur next. Frankly, pretty darn scary stuff there is no two ways about it. And now this startup is saying that they can use footage from regular security cameras.

And what it does is it looks for people who are fidgeting, who are restless, and other potentially suspicious body languages. And I'll go into any detail about what that actually means. But this really does remind me of the movie Minority Report. We keep going back to that, don't we? Where we've got algorithms here instead of the three people who can see into the future. We got algorithms analyzing the security camera footage and then what it does is alert staff about potential thieves and it does it via a smartphone app. So, think about what they've been doing over in Vegas for so long where they're monitoring everybody on the floor the looking for people who are trying to game the gaming system out there. And they have the security guards running around and you do something they don't like and you're going to the very least be ejected Well, in this case, the goal is prevention. And what happens here is if the targets approached and asked if they need help.

They found that it's a good chance that the theft never happens. So, they have a smartphone app that the security people are carrying around, the loss prevention people, and they see somebody is looking a little fidgety. The app automatically informs them. They go over and just say Hey, need any help. And that's about all it takes. Now we're talking about real money. Shoplifting costs the global retail industry about $34 billion in lost sales in 2017. It's crazy and that's the biggest shortage source, excuse me, of shrinkage. Of course, there's a lot of shrinkages. It goes out the back door of the store as well. But the biggest one is people who are stealing and that amounts by the way to 2% of revenue. That's a huge chunk of revenue when you get right down to it. And the whole retail industry is known for very narrow, very thin margins.

So, when you're talking about 2% of revenue, it's hurting them dramatically. But the other side is if they can stop it that opportunity is absolutely huge. And they're projecting that retailers are going to invest about $200 billion in new tech this year. That's according to Gartner. And they'll probably become more open to embracing technology to meet consumer needs. Interesting stuff isn't it and you know we're being tracked as we walk around the stores our smartphones are being used to track as if you've got an iPhone a more recent iPhone they really can't track you very well, they don't know when you're re-entering the store but this company got founded and funded to the tune of about a half a million dollars and it's the middle of a series A seeking to raise $10 million or more courses all Japanese yen I'm doing quick comparisons and translations in my head, as we're going along, so, we'll see what happens there.

And you can expect to be monitored by this software or something very similar to it next time you go shopping because some of this is already out there. And they're using it, the police departments to determine who might be a terrorist. They're comparing our faces to the National Crime NCIC information computer system. Where all of our data is being shared. A lot of states take our drivers licenses and share that information. I still don't have a regular driver's license that has the TSA compatible components on it. Because I don't want the state to keep my picture although that means I have to have a passport as well in order to in order to have that ability to fly.

Although I try not to fly, whenever possible. So, let's talk about our cars here for a second and the police and these new autonomous vehicles.

By now everybody's heard of Elon Musk, and you've heard of his cars, the Tesla's and and I remember a few years back talking about how Consumer Reports, of course, reports on cars and how they had a very high rating and how the National Transportation Safety Board, when they tested the Tesla Model S for safety, it basically broke their whole system because it performed so well. They had to revise and to change the way they measure the safety of cars because Tesla was just so good. Well, now we've got a few issues with Tesla, first of all, Consumer Reports has put all models of Tesla on their lower, do not buy lists from their top list, which is kind of a shocker. And that's due to the long term effects of owning a Tesla, the longevity.

Where part start to fail how expensive they are, if you bought a Tesla you probably notice how crazy expensive the insurance is. Because it's expensive to repair a Tesla. Which I guess makes sense there aren't a lot of them and there aren't dealers everywhere. There's no competitive market for Tesla parts. Now we've got Elon Musk, making a statement that truly got some people concerned. And he's kind of backtracked that statement a little bit. But Elon Musk was talking about how our Tesla's within a year or so, is going to be completely autonomous. They are going to be completely self-driving, even on side roads. And there's debate as to whether or not that's even possible at this point in time that Tesla doesn't have the same sorts of sensors that the other fully autonomous vehicles that are currently on the road being tested. It doesn't have the same types of sensors with LIDAR and other things.

So, can they actually do it? And, and that's where he kind of backtracked a little bit. Well, when we have these autonomous vehicles, there are so many questions that come up, and we're going to talk about two of them right now. One of them is should police have the ability to control your self-driving car? Bloomberg published a story last Wednesday about how our autonomous vehicle should interact with law enforcement. Because there was a story that came out back in December 2018 about a driver who fell asleep behind the wheel of a Tesla with his autopilot engaged. And apparently, the driver was drunk I guess is what was going on. But at any rate, he fell asleep. So, that Tesla is driving down the highway and the police are trying to pull it over and they cannot pull it over.

So, they're trying to figure out what what-what do we do here, the drivers intoxicated, he's falling asleep behind the wheel, the cars driving down the highway at whatever speed was driving at the time. This is a problem that autonomous vehicle manufacturers are going to have to address. And it's also something Law enforcement going to have to try and figure out as well. Now it's one thing if it's a completely autonomous vehicle, you look at some of those stuff like Mercedes has, there's no steering wheel, there's no driver you get in where you are "fall on the floor" drunk or you are wide awake, working on business stuff, you have no responsibility to control the car. The car can be pre-programmed to take you somewhere which would happen in the case of like a like an almost a taxi service saying, pick me up here. Drop me off there and off it goes. Right. That's what Uber is aiming for. We have also privately owned vehicles and we can do this thing like Take me home. And so the car just takes you home, right? And life hopefully is good.

Well, should the car be monitoring you? If you're vomiting? Should the car redirect itself to the hospital should it be monitoring your pulse and respiration, to know that, hey, you just had a heart attack, I need to take you to the hospital. You know, how far does the responsibility of the autonomous vehicle and it's manufacturer and software developer, how far does that responsibility actually extend.

Very, very good questions here and man, we are going to have some fun as time goes forward as we try and answer these. So, going back to December 2018, you got a drunk driver in a Tesla sound asleep. Normally what would happen that car would be involved in a wreck. Someone else might be terribly injured. A whole family might be killed. Heaven knows that

It's happened before. Now that cars just driving down the road all by itself and the police officer notices the guys asleep. So what they did is the police went and blocked the car in. So they got in front of the car. They got behind the car. They got beside the car on both sides. And they just slowed down. And the Tesla sensors said okay, was nothing I can do here. I have to slow down I can't change lanes. And so the Tesla ended up stopping which makes sense, right.

But should that Tesla notice those flashing lights? Should that Tesla have had the ability for the police officers to say, stop and pull over, Right? How far should have been able to go? and if that car has the smarts to stop for flashing light, what's to stop a bad guy from just using the strobe in their car to have, you know the car in front of them pull over. So, that they can molest someone or what whatever it is the bad guy wants to do.

And even if it's not based on the flashing lights, which it would kind of have to be, initially. Because we're not going to have the control systems in the police vehicles, but if the police vehicles now do have those control systems and they can pull the car over with just a remote command. Wants to say that again, the bad guys aren't going to try and hack those. So, very murky legal territory. If you own that car, should the police have the ability and the right to control that car and how far should that go?

Particularly, if that vehicle and or the driver of the vehicle is not doing anything illegal? So? you're just driving down the road everything's wonderful. You are being all the speed limits all of the traffic signs, you are not being erratic, you're not zooming past people. Should the police be able to pull you over at that point?

Kind of goes back to, I guess, the checkpoint things, right? Should you have to stop at a sobriety checkpoint even though you know that you are sober. and I don't like those personally either, because even though I never drink and drive, and I've never been drunk, even though that that has never happened to me, I still resent these things because it is truly an invasion of privacy.

Very interesting questions, Isn't it? Very interesting. We already have police departments that have these remote controlled little race car type things that they can launch from underneath their car. And what happens is they drive it underneath the car in front of them. So, it's this little, think of this little RC cars, you know that you had remote control cars, that you're driving out there. Well, they have in the middle do 80 miles an hour. So, it goes right up under your car and then it sets off an electromagnetic pulse, which of course shut off your engine if you're driving a modern car.

And now your engine shut off and you have to stop because there's no engine anymore, right? Should they be allowed to do that? Well, they're already doing that in some jurisdictions. Now we got another point here when we're talking about self-driving cars and I think friends of mine that are in the insurance business and I start getting really kind of worried.

A Tesla Model X in Southern California. If you were to buy that, the insurance premium at least this is a few years ago, was about $10,000 a year.

Now, I mentioned already why Tesla's are so expensive? Because they're very expensive to fix. You can get into a five mile an hour accident, a fender bender basically in the Tesla and it can cost you five to 10 grand to get that fixed. Okay. It's a very big deal, but there's also the limited self-driving, what they call autopilot mode on the autonomous vehicles.

Now, there are more and more sensors that are getting built into these things, but the underwriters and the actuaries are trying to figure out, how do they handle this new type of risk before it was you, you were in control, and either your equipment failed. And you know, your brakes didn't work, you couldn't steer your tire blew out, whatever it might be, and they know what those numbers look like because they've got a century-plus worth of data.

Simple enough, right? Well, how about you as a driver? Well, they've got information on you as well and nowadays are using credit checks and everything else, which I think is nuts in order to come up with your insurance rate. But they've got all of this data and there's very few Model X's on the road. So, how do they figure that out? And then the bigger question when we start looking at this, it was addressed.

This is really great, Deloitte, you probably familiar with that company, in 2019 insurance outlook report, they said the rise of connectivity has generated a massive amount of real-time data and turned the insurer's relationship with policyholders from static and transactional to dynamic and interactive.

So, what this means is basically everything has changed. We're now transitioning that transitions is just starting now. If your autonomous vehicle is in an accident, who's responsible? Do you even need to have insurance anymore? No, you might have medical insurance, you might have some sort of collision insurance kind of a gap insurance sort of thing for you. For your medical expenses or for the medical expenses of other people in your vehicle.

But even then, who should be responsible for the medical expenses, because the tables we have right now that the insurance companies are using to figure out our liability and how much they should be charging us, those are based on more than 90% of accidents are caused by human error.

So, if you take the driver out of the equation when it comes to the accident itself. We're talking about big changes for insurers because 90% of that whole market transaction is changing. So, this is absolutely huge. They're forecasting trouble for insurers as automation becomes more widespread. Premiums could drop, they're saying maybe 12% or so by 2035. I think they should probably drop more than that. But who carries the insurance is the person who owns the vehicle? Is it the person who's in the vehicle operating it? quote unquote, even though they may not even have a steering wheel.

Is it the manufacturer of the car, that should be liable? Is it the people who wrote the software? Is the company that was contracted to write the software? And remember, there isn't just one piece of software, there are dozens of computers and I mean, dozens and dozens and dozens of computers in a modern car, each one of them could fail. Is that the manufacturer of the CANBUS or whatever the buses all of these computers are using to talk to each other? Who has the liability? So, as automation levels in these cars reach level.s four and five, where you have complete fully autonomous, no human involvement.

Insurance is going to change dramatically. So, what about the local guy that's been selling new insurance for your vehicle, forever?

Isn't that interesting? You're still going to have some insurance I'm sure that's never going to go away but in this case, the driver won't be the risky part. The liability is really going to migrate to the manufacturer. The licensees of the software. It's just going to change.

Nationwide is one insurance company that's starting to think about the problem and I'm sure, frankly, all of them are but Nationwide's come up with some interesting stuff. So, check out online Craig Peterson dot com, you are going to find an article here that you've got to read. This is from QZ dot com. Britain is moving to a cashless society. So, what happens to poor people who don't have bank accounts, credit cards. Who doesn't have access to that? Sweden already is a great example of how not to get rid of cash. Most of the banks in the country of Sweden don't accept paper money or coins. Same things true of a lot of restaurants and stores, even public toilets. How about the elderly. The poor, people with handicaps. Okay, what's going to happen

Unknown 27:00
of them in cash isn't available. Got to think about all of this stuff. The government likes the idea because it's easier for them to track and make sure people aren't cheating. But on the other hand, I'm not sure that this is such a great idea. And you know me, right. I am a cash kinda guy. Anyhow, have a great day we will be back next week and tune in every day if you're not already on my podcast. Have a look for it you'll find me Craig Peterson dot com slash iTunes you can go to Craig Peterson comm slash almost anything Facebook or Twitter or I think SoundCloud TUNE IN JUST Craig Peterson dot com slash iTunes and let me know what you think. Leave a message say hello and have a great week. Make sure you check this morning's email you should have gotten my newsletter which is at Craig Peterson dot com slash subscribe comes out every week.

Have a great day. Take care. Bye-bye.

--- 

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---

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www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

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Mar 6, 2019

Craig is with Ken and Phil, with Phil Harriman covering for Matt. They talked about smart assistants' ethical code, China mapping pigs' faces, and can you trust online reviews?

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Alexa, Call The Police! Smart Assistants Should Come With A ‘Moral Ai’ To Decide Whether To Report Their Owners For Breaking The Law, Experts Say

Can You Trust Online Reviews? Here’s How To Find The Fakes

China’s Tech Firms Are Mapping Pig Faces
---

 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/06/2019

Moral Artificial Intelligence - China Mapping Pig Faces - Trusting Online Reviews

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey, good morning, everybody. Craig Peterson here. I had fun this morning, I was on with Ken Altshuler, and he had a guest host in with him Phil Harriman, he's a former senator there in the state of Maine. And we talked about a couple of things. And, and I managed to rip him a bit. He's a big time supporter of left wing causes. I don't want to call him a Democrat because he's not really a Democrat. But you know, I got to rip him this morning, we talked about smart assistance and whether or not they should have a moral artificial intelligence and we got into the Chinese tech firms mapping pig faces this morning. It was really kind of fun. You gotta listen anyhow, hope you're having a great day as well. And we did talk a little bit about online reviews, but not as much as yesterday with Jim so here we go.

Ken Altshuler 0:53 
Always on a Wednesday morning at 7:38. We welcome in our tech guru Craig Peterson. Good morning to you Craig.

Craig 1:02 
Hey good morning. Yeah I'm a little clogged up myself this morning I was just coughing and hacking. Oh my. That time of the year.

Ken 1:10
New England March isn't the weather like 20 degrees below what it's supposed to be?

Craig 1:15
I thought it was global warming. Is it not Ken?

Ken 1:20 
It is. No, it's climate change. Climate change.

Craig 1:24
Oh so when global warming doesn't work that it becomes climate

Ken 1:28 
Correct

Phil Harriman 1:28
No no no no. Its extreme weather.

Ken 1:32
Yes exactly. Extreme weather. Highs and lows and bad hurricanes, bad tornadoes.

Craig 1:37
Here in Maine, I'm a firm believer in climate change. Absolutely. We have four seasons at least every year. That's four times a climate changes.

Ken 1:46 
In Maine we have two seasons Craig, winter and Fourth of July. 

Craig 1:51
That's road repair and winter.

Ken 1:55 
Exactly. So let's talk about some tests. So I have as you know, Craig, Alexa. And let me, for all you people listening out there, Alexa, pay attention. So we do something with these smart assistants that kind of have a moral code to follow? 

Craig 2:05
Yeah, this is real interesting stuff. And I'm not sure exactly which side of this I come down on. We've heard a lot about artificial intelligence, right? It's been kind of the bane of science fiction writers for ever. Now the carbon project in the early 60s, a big movie that was out all the way through today. And of course, even before that, but artificial intelligence. The whole idea is that our computers are going to be smart enough to learn by themselves make decisions by themselves. And today we have really no artificial intelligence per se, but we do have what's called machine learning. Where are our computers etc. can learn your iPhone your newer iPhones have a machine learning chip built into them. And that helps them learn a little bit about you. And every time you use your Alexa or use your Google Home device, it's learning a little bit more about you and what you do and how you do it. So it's coming. It's kind of inevitable, we think and nothing's past what's called the Turing test yet for those of us that are a little more geeky about this but when we're talking about our Alexa there's been a proposal that comes out obviously it makes sense to have your Alexa be able to call the police, it can call your friends anybody that's in your phone book. My granddaughter used an Alexa we got for them just the other day. She was stuck outside the house she locked herself out. And we had an Amazon Alexa in the house that we've given them and she went ahead and yelled through the window Alexa, call mom and of course it did. And Mom said call me back. This is a bad connection. No, no, no, like outside the house until mom knew. And she managed to get home with the key and was able to to let my granddaughter in. Those are all really good things.

But we've got some scientists now over in Norway at the University of Bergen spore just speaking last week at a conference out in Hawaii and they were saying that what should happen well they're saying all of our smart devices should listen to what's going on in a home and then use artificial intelligence to determine if maybe they should report the goings on in the home to the police, child Family Services etc etc. And this is at a conference of ethics and society in Hawaii. You know Ken when you you're talking about Orwellian I can't think of anything more Orwellian than this. Where we have been putting these devices into our homes into our cars now pretty much everywhere in our phones and they're talking about turning them into spies for who, right? How far can this go? I don't know Phil and Ken. This really scares me.

Phil 5:36
Well just listening to you describe the power in a device in your home could have is frightening and in I would assume this has got a
an onboarding or in boarding opportunity as well meaning that they can put things into your system that gets communicated into the house or control things that are in your house that you know that you have no influence over?

Craig 5:54 
Yeah, absolutely. Yeah, they could and they can upgrade them. For instance, Google just got nailed because they've been selling this home security device, and no one knew that Google had hidden inside of it a microphone that Google just activated this month. So it's, it's really, really scary. And we're talking about an ethical conflict here between people in the family, you know, between mom and dad in the kid, you know what happens when the kid is reaching up to grab a hot pot of water off of the stove, and mom screams at that the kid this is legitimately and now that little device in your home makes an ethical moral decision and report you to the police along with all of the recordings that devices made of anytime that device thinks, well, this was marginal, but it's not enough to call the police. And now all of a sudden the police have completely out of context, all of this stuff that makes you look really, really bad, you know, and then the ethical conflicts between not only the members of family, but the manufacturer, the shareholders, the manufacturers, programmers, the police department, and, and having these universities say yes, indeed we should have them recording and having other people jump on board and agree with them. I think we were in for some rough road.

But take that to our cars, right. And in in Maine, we've got some of these artificial intelligence companies doing some development along with a mapping technology, much of which originated right here in Maine. Right? Who, if you're in an accident, whose fault is it? Is it yours? Because you own the car? Is it the people who wrote the software? Is it the car manufacturer who hired the people who hired the company that hired the people that wrote the software, you know, Ken, man maybe you should get out of the family lawn into some of the ethical law because for the next 20 to 50 years things are going to be just crazy in that side of the business.

Ken 8:07
We're talking to Craig Peterson, our tech guru.

Phil 8:08 
Big Brother.

Ken 8:09 
What are you talking about?

Phil 8:10 
It was just frightening what he's saying.

Craig 8:14
BOC's on board. I'm sure so it'll be okay.

Ken 8:19
Is there a reason why you guys are ganging up on me today?

Phil 8:24
Yeah. Because I like you.

Ken 8:26
I think she does a very nice dance on rooftops. That's all I want to say. We're joined by Craig Peterson our tech guru who joins us Wednesdays at 7:38. Online reviews. Now, I went the other day to buy a wrist brace for my right wrist. I have something when I played piqua. And, you know, I went to read the reviews because how else do I know which of these products have good? I mean, I assume that those reviews were accurate? Not necessarily, huh?

Craig 8:53 
Yeah, the legitimacy of these things comes into question and it can be a very, very big deal because we're using them all the time I use them on Yelp. I I go into a new town, I'm I'm traveling somewhere. And I just sought my Yelp app and say, you know, where's the nice restaurants in the area? And how about you guys? What do you do? Do I tend to not trust reviews? When it's like, one or two? or five? Or 10, right?

Ken 9:25 
If it's like, if it's 400 or 500, I tend to pay attention.

Craig 9:27 
Yeah, exactly. And that makes sense. And there's reviews everywhere, right? Well, there are some tips of what to do, what not to do when you're looking at these reviews order to judge the veracity. And there was even a study done on this, like there's a study on everything nowadays, I think, frankly. But Amazon, Yelp, Facebook, Google, and it is easy for businesses and others to purchase hundreds of reviews within days. So there's your 400 number can you know that they can all be false. And then the other side of this is businesses will sometimes post negative reviews for their competitors which is another big problem. So when you get right down to it and looking at some of these studies and some 30% according to the study of online reviews are fake reviews. NBC News created a gardening business on Facebook they paid 168 bucks to some online websites that promise suppose positive reviews and for 168 bucks, they got 1000 the likes and a few days after that they got more than 600 5-star reviews.

So I think Ken we've got to be careful about this. I personally look at the reviews I look at what's been written and how it's phrased and stuff and I try and evaluate it from that but one of the easiest things you can do to figure out if reviews or false is took at the language that's being used. Because when you do purchase the reviews, you give a sample of what you're looking for these reviewers, these fake reviewers to say. And oftentimes they'll repeat it. Phil, you ready? They'll they'll repeat it. Just like democrats repeat the morning news bites, as opposed to talking about all day long.

Phil 11:27
Do you like us know, Kenny? I can't. I can't let this go any further. Without shifting gears to the China's tech firms are mapping. Wait for it. Wait for it, folks. They're mapping pig faces. Alright. Take it away. Take it away Craig.

Craig 11:44
We'll make this one really quick because I know we're out of time here. But yes, there is a very big problem in China right now. And it isn't the pig farts. What we're talking about is disease. And of course there's a lot of trans-species disease stuff that can happen. Certainly with birds. Most of our flus come from birds. But in this case, here's what's happening. China, China has been using facial recognition technology for a long time to spy on its own people. They've been doing that a lot in London, as well as other places in the UK. But right now what they're trying to do is track the pig farmers because many of the small pig farms are polluting the environment. Yes, indeed, that is the truth. An AOC thing was a bit of a joke there, but polluting the environment. So they want to keep track of the pigs where they came from, what diseases they might have, and they're doing it with facial recognition technology of the pigs as well as they're listening to the pigs conversations in order to determine if a pig might be sick because apparently pigs talk differently when they're not feeling well.

Phil 12:57
So Craig, as we move  on from this point forward when we refer to AOC we can also refer to KPA. Kenneth P. Altshuler.

Ken 13:09
Craig Peterson joining us. He joins us, Wednesdays at 7:38. Craig, thanks for joining us. We'll talk to you next Wednesday.

Craig 13:16
Hey Ken, thanks for being a good sport. It was kind of fun.

Ken 13:20 
I don't mind all. Thank you guys. We're gonna take a quick break.

Craig 13:26
Hey, I released module three yesterday we had a great coaching call, live coaching call yesterday as well for everyone in the course. So shout out to you guys. You should have gotten Module Three, let me know if you did not. And then three, of course, we're delving into network security stuff, what you can do and how to do it. Take care guys, I'll be back tomorrow. I'm going to do a couple of security things this week on. One on Thursday, one on Friday, so keep an eye out for those as well in the podcasts. Thanks again. Bye bye.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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Mar 5, 2019

Craig is on the Jim Polito show this morning talking about how to spot fake online reviews. They also talked about storing your health records on your iPhone. Can Apple be trusted to keep your records safe?

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

Can You Trust Online Reviews? Here’s How To Find The Fakes
--- 

 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/05/2019

Who Should Store Our Health Records - Can You Trust Online Reviews

Craig Peterson: 0:00
Hey, good morning everybody. Craig Peterson here. I finally got that installing Windows bonus put together here for the second module in the course so it goes into a lot of depth. Got it done. Got it out. Put together all of the notes for people so keep an eye out if you are in that master course if you bought into that. We'll get some free master classes will be coming up in about a month or so. So keep an eye out for that as well. This morning on Jim Polito, a couple of frankly kind of big topics. One is about online fake reviews, can you trust them? And we got into some detail including that trick that um, I don't know anybody else that seems to know about about how to find the fake reviews and with this huge, huge economy. $10 trillion economy just in medical care. Can we trust Apple to keep our medical records safe because they are already doing it? If people are opting into it. So we chatted with Mr. Polito about that this morning as well. So here we go.

Jim Polito 1:16
Here he is. The guy who gets it all. I'm talking about our Tech Talk guru Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir. You are always a five star review on this show.

Craig 1:33
Thanks. Always glad to be here. Always.

Jim 1:34 
Always a five star review. Now that's the big question here. How do we tell whether or not we're looking at fake online reviews because I'll tell you, you know as you buy more stuff online and as you can't hold it, touch it, you know it's or maybe it's something you haven't bought before you want online reviews to see what it's like. And I have used them frequently. How do I know I'm not being scammed?

Craig 2:08 
Well, you're kind of average in some ways but some people.

Jim 2:12
I'm a little below average when you, when you get right down to it, but yeah.

Craig 2:17
Well most people do do that. They do go online. They do read reviews. And statistics out there right now we're showing that most people read about seven reviews before they make the purchase. Is that where you're at?

Jim 2:33
Yeah, I'll read about them. And you know, I was talking with the guys earlier, but I want to see a product that's get, that's got a lot of reviews because then that way I know I want to see a product that's got a lot of reviews and then that way I know that okay, you know, there's more than just three reviews I'm basing my opinion on.

Craig 2:57 
Yeah, you're absolutely right in doing that. That's kind of what I've done here over the years as the internet's kind of grown. But it makes sense, right? It's, it's the social justification. It's, you ask a friend, hey, should I buy this? What's the best? That's right. It's the same sort of thing. And there's, there's a Dr. Ted Lapis, who is an assistant professor of business down at Stevens Institute of Technology did a study and he valued at 2.3 million online reviews. And he was specifically looking at hotels, so to about 5000 hotels to try and figure out are there fake ones? Aren't there fake ones? He said that he thought that there were about 15 to 30% of all online reviews that are falsified. And he came up with two ways to figure out whether or not they're fake. And it's interesting because I've heard a lot of different ways to do it. You've got Danny who want whoever writes the review to be an English major right?

Jim 4:04
Well, sometimes grammar and all that also is an indication of intelligence and intellect. So I, I'm with Danny a little bit on this one, even though Steve is not but.

Craig 4:33
Yeah, well I'm kind of more with Steve because I look at these things and say well it's terrible English and grammar it may well be one of these sites that you can go to online you can go and buy reviews. I'm going to talk about how to figure out what's what. But you can go out and buy reviews right now you can get 100 reviews right now. If you wanted to double the number of reviews on your Facebook page Jim you could go out and you could get another hundred and you can buy them both ways because you can think of this right it isn't just hey, I don't want I want more people to come to my business. I'm going to try and get people to give five star reviews and you can do the opposite, like Danny did on the Jim Polito Facebook page where he used a fake name and gave you a one star.

Jim 5:08
You're trying to set up dissension in the ranks here.

Craig 5:13
So you can go either way. So a lot of businesses do post fake reviews for their competitors and many businesses do it for themselves to try and raise it. So people write though, you know, that's kind of the big difference here. So it was something like a fire TV stick or you know, the which is the Amazon Smart TV or Roku where you're talking about 100,000 or more reviews, you're not going to make a difference, right?

Jim 5:39
No but you can look at them in different, you know, like I read them because you might hear something in it a complaint from someone, even if it's a positive review of something like okay, I want to make sure this product does what I'm looking for. It doesn't have this and and so I go in like kind of an auditor does it just kind of sample the soup.

Craig 6:05 
Okay well let me give you a couple of tips here, alright? First of all if you see the same text again and again like the, for instance, the democrats talking points and they come up for the day and you hear every democrat say the exact same thing all day long okay,  when we're talking about their you know the guys and gals down in the cesspool in Washington DC, not that I have an opinion about the matter. But if you see that same text based over and over, if you see a lot of reviews for the same product or place that are kind of out of line gets felt like the mom and pop restaurant on Yelp. If they've got a few hundred reviews you get to kind of wonder the same reviewer a lot that's a problem but the here's an interesting way to figure it out as well. If you really want to get into it because a lot of the reviews will take will put up a picture. So it might be a picture of the reviewer, it might be a picture of the place or a picture of the product. And I got a little secret here. Most people don't know about if you really want to find out so you're not buying a $5 something rather, who cares if it works or not. And maybe you're buying a $300 pair of headphones or something, take that picture that they have either the reviewer and by the way, if the reviewer looks like George Clooney, okay? It's probably fake.

Jim 7:32
Danny's a pretty handsome guy. You know, I mean. It looks like the picture that's in the frame. When you buy a frame. You mean one of those?

Craig 7:46 
Exactly. What the guys will do is they'll go out and find pictures online and they'll use them as their own picture or they'll use them as a picture of the product. So you will see this a lot for home construction places you know, hey. We do renovations and stuff. And if you save that, so you right click on that picture, and you save it to your hard disk, save it to your machine, and then go to Google and select images. Now what Google has, if you look in that search bar on the right hand side, when your images, there's a little camera, you click on the camera, and you upload the picture. So the picture of the reviewer, the pictures of the product, the picture of the house redone, and Google will search online and find that picture.

Jim 8:35 
Oh, the reverse image search.

Craig 8:38 
It's the reverse image. This is exactly what it is. So it'll find that picture and now all of a sudden, you know, Hey, wait a minute. This is a stock photo. Now, one of my son's was kind of helping out with this dating site online, because, of course, you know, it's a picture of Jim Polito from 19 you know, XX right? But this is up there on Jim's page and.

Jim 9:05
He looks so thin.

Craig 9:08 
He looks like George Clooney I just can't get it so. So what he was doing up for the dating site and and it was a paid side. And so he did this kind of, you know your reviews so many you know I can remember that there's like 100 a month of people's posts when they apply for the dating site and he would use the reverse image search and find, he said more than half of the time, people were taking stock photos and using them as their own photo on the dating sites. So there's a couple of hints here for you.

Jim 9:49 
So the first thing you look for is you look at the picture that goes up with the review, you save it, you do a reverse image search and if it comes up like you're doing a product search on something and then it comes up like the company then you go all this is ridiculous. Or if it comes up as a stock photo somewhere else, you know it's not a real person.

Craig 10:11 
Yeah, exactly. Or if it comes up with a completely different name for that person, right which the reverse image is going to do and then look for the Democratic talking points of the day look for the same text the same phrases being used over and over again because what happens is that companies when they want to buy 50 reviews for instance, they have to give these reviewers the texts that they're going to use. Now, most of these companies are trying to stop this from happening, it's difficult to do, obviously, they don't want to see 50 reviews coming from the same internet address. So the bad guys excuse me, the bad guys, if you will, will go ahead and they'll use a whole bunch of different internet addresses. So what they do is they pay people all over the world and they pay them a nickel to post a review. And then they charge the business a couple hundred bucks. And they just made themselves a cool hundred and $180 for doing the work. And they they had other people around the world do it for them for next to nothing. So that's what's up?

Jim 11:17 
We're talking with Craig Peterson, our Tech Talk guru helping us to understand what's a fake online review and what's a real online review? All right, let's just shift gears here. Storing my health records on my phone. Now, that'd be great and convenient and helpful in an emergency. But can Apple with my iPhone live up to the privacy values they've established? Can they do it? 

Craig 12:00
That's such a good question because Apple of course has been very, very conscientious about making sure that they keep your data safe. They don't send it up to the cloud, unless you tell them to. They don't share it. They they don't love law enforcement into your phone. You know, they've been very, very conscientious about this. And now we have a whole new market that's been developing over the last couple of years. And this is really kind of interesting when you when you look at the numbers, but the global healthcare industry is expected to reach $10 trillion. My 2021 is bigger than the economy of any country in the world other than the US and China and trillion. So you've got Amazon, Google, Microsoft and Apple who are among the companies that are trying to get a piece of that pie. So we've got Amazon buying pharmacies. They've got this automated pharmacy that they've bought and they're they're trying to get the laws changed about pharmacies and how they can do it. The same thing with some of these other guys are buying retail pharmacies are using artificial intelligence now for disease detection. In fact, your iPhone can be better at spotting skin cancer than a skin cancer doctor. And that's been the studies have shown that again and again. Isn't that something? And Apple has now tied into cardiac monitors and other things.

Jim 13:33 
I know that. The FDA approved them for machines that basically give you and EKG.

Craig 13:40
Yeah, exactly. It's like a three lead EKG. So it's amazing what's happening in healthcare, but the problem is privacy. We got the HIPAA rules and regulations in place some years ago, and we were sold a bill of goods somehow it was going to keep everything more private. In fact, because they require doctors to digitize the records that turned out that it's been less private than it ever was before. So back to your original question, can we trust Apple when it comes to our healthcare records? Well, amongst the my choices Apple, Amazon, Google or Microsoft, Apple, hands down, there's, there's just no question about it. They really are trying to keep our data safe there as their CEO, Tim Cook has been a very vocal advocate for privacy, right? He's been talking against Google and Facebook for making money off of user data and all. So this is coming. It's already here. You may not be aware of it, but there's about 200 healthcare providers around the United States that are now using the health record feature that is part of Apple's iPhone. So they started to kind of use San Diego is expanded to 200 different healthcare organizations. This within the next five to 10 years is going to be the norm. And this is one game I really hope Apple wins.

Jim 15:14 
Wow, this has been fascinating. Now look, folks, what I want you to do is text my name to the number that Craig is going to give you. You'll get all this information plus more. Plus, if there's ever a massive hack or a data breach, Craig Peterson will send you information. He doesn't pester you. He doesn't charge for this. He doesn't try to sell you anything and he doesn't sell your name to anyone else. Standard data and text rates apply. Text my name to this number.

Craig 15:45 
855-385-5553. That's 855-385-5553.

Jim 15:54 
All right. Standard data and text rates apply. It's a great thing Craig as usual. Awesome segment Always a pleasure and we'll talk to you next week.

---

Don't miss any episode from Craig. Visit http://CraigPeterson.com/itunes. Subscribe and give us a rating!

Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

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Mar 4, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath as they discussed the email and phone scams that are happening right now, as well as the new hoax circulating, the Momo challenge.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/04/2019

Telephone Scammers

Craig Peterson 0:00
Good morning, everybody. Monday morning. I was up early this morning on the air with Jack Heath, as I am pretty much every Monday and he wanted to talk a little bit about some of the scams that are going on because, man, they are hitting him and everybody else. The statistics are just crazy on these phone scams. You know, you pay for your mobile phone. And then they did try and scam you men paying for the bad guys. So here we go.

Jack Heath 0:29
Alright, joining us now on the Auto Fair listener lines. Thank you for the indulgence and patience. Our Tech Talk guy, Craig Peterson. And Craig, so many scams right now. So many emails, so many phone calls on the warranty department about a car you no longer own. So many people calling you about your Chase account even if you don't have one, wanting your credit information. It's impossible to keep up with this stuff.

Craig  0:51
Crazy eh? Good morning Jack. I got an email last week and I ended up writing an article put it up on my website because I got an email from Apple support supposedly. It is across the board. My father got caught up in one of these tech support scams where he was having some problems with his computer. And he got a phone call saying it looked like his computer might have been hacked. And they need to get on and have a look and he fell for it. It's really bad. So I went through and spend some time last week writing this whole thing up talking about what the red flags are, if it's legitimate, what you should do. The FBI has been telling us that there is about a $12 billion dollar industry out there right now trying to scam businesses into wiring money. And when I say 12 billion I mean they have $12 billion cash out of businesses by doing this.

Jack 1:53
Well Justin had a relative pass away where the other day you got a nice letter Justin, a Tweet?

Justin 1:57
A Twitter direct message. My uncle Husson Isaac, apparently had passed away in a tsunami in Indonesia and he left me $3.6 million. Craig. All I do is give my personal information and they will give me half of it.

Craig 2:12
Wow, that's really good. Half of the money. Wow, you didn't even know it was there. Another big one Jack did I got for one of our listeners. And Justin, you might have heard of this too. But in one of our live listeners and yours too Jack, he works at one of our local school districts. And after the kids come back from holidays here. He's going to be talking about this, but the Momo challenge has raised its ugly head again. Talking about scams. This is a hoax. Have you heard about this? The Momo challenge? 

Jack 2:43
Yes.

Justin 2:44 
Oh, yeah.

Craig 2:45 
And yeah, it's it's kind of a big deal. There are no reports, by the way from any police department that I could find, or in any articles I could find. There are no reports that anyone's actually been harmed as a result of the phenomena. But it's again another scam and it's the scammers are out there last year course was the year ransomware by the bad guys where they will take over your computer, yeah. And will hold it ransom, your information ransom. It's still a very big deal. But this year, they're changing their angles because of the popularity of some of these cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, and they're now taking over your computer to spread scams, but also to use your computer to mind for Bitcoin and it's going to cost you a lot of money because ultimately you have to pay the electric bill for all of their money they're doing but these scams are difficult. The FCC is trying to do some things FCC is doing some things. Our State Attorney General's office is doing things and there's also reporting available you can report online to the FBI in order to report to them the scams.

Jack 4:01
It's not just your computer anymore and of course our phones or computers but these scammers are calling people directly pretending to be the IRS, pretending to be your your bank, pretending to be some relative, and pretending to be the warranty department of a car you owned you know 10 years ago and the bottom line is just don't answer the call hang up you can call them back and you can tell it's a scam. And don't open an email and click anything and don't give information because most of your credit or legitimate organizations don't call you and ask for this information.

Craig 4:39
Yeah, absolutely. And they don't send the types of emails that we've been seeing. And the current reports that are out there by the way otter that this year 50% of all mobile calls will be scams so that means half of the time that call is going to be a scam. Massachusetts has seen a 500% growth in spam and fraud calls as of the end of last year we're seeing something similar so yeah Be careful there is software you can use I've mentioned Hiya before. H-I-Y-A on your show Jack. I use that to help block scam calls but it's gotten. So bad basically I block every call that comes to me that not from someone I already know. All of the rest of them end up going to voicemail.

Jack 5:28
All right, Craig Peterson good stuff. Craig Peterson with an O-N.com. Thank you on this Monday morning.

Craig 5:34
Thanks. Take care.

Craig 5:35
Hey, if you are in my current group coaching session, or if you run it last Thursday, I mentioned that I was releasing this week for all of the people who signed up for the course of very detailed installation instructions on Windows 10, what to do, what options to take. And we even included in that what hardware to get and what's the differences between the different hardware, why you should get this or that what's a workstation, the different types of processors and everything very, very in depth. So have a look for that. It's in your insider account. That video, the transcription, my slides, you know, everything per usual. So I'll have a lookout for that and I hope everybody has a great week. I'll be back tomorrow with Mr. Jim Polito.

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Mar 1, 2019

Browsers are being Attacked.  Just this week we are hearing about another attack against the browsers we use daily listen in for more details.

We have all seen reviews online. But can they be trusted?  Turns out --- maybe not....

New research is being done on Swine diseases in China. These diseases are rampant and now the Chinese are running full force to technology for answers.

Android is trying to up their Security.  Listen in to find out what they are doing.

The FTC has just issued a ruling on TokTok.  I'll be talking about that today too.

Health records are now a big business. I'll tell you why so many of the big tech players are trying to get into the game.

We will also talk about the MOMO challenge.  

There's lots to talk about tech this week.  So grab a seat and join me. 

For more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/02/2019

Researchers Our Smart Home Be Big Brother - Health Records On Smart Phones - New Browser Attacks - Momo Challenge

Craig Peterson: 0:00
Hey. Hi everybody. Craig Peterson here, it's time for our weekly radio show. A lot to cover as always, it has been a very fun week. For me. I have really been enjoying this as we've been doing more and more content for our Insider's site, and the people who signed up for this master course. And welcome aboard. Thanks, everybody, for being with us. You are, I'm sure going to continue to love it. We've had great feedback, more and more people giving us just, you know, a little bit of encouragement, which I always, always appreciate. Let me tell you, it is difficult to put some of this stuff together and to do it. Yeah, you know, so I appreciate the appreciate should including here on the radio show. So welcome to everybody.

I had a couple of conversations last week about some of the browser hacks that are going on so we're going to cover that again there's a new browser attack a whole new type the to really just kind of an old browser hack that is back again. Some very troubling news coming out of Hawaii and some scientists over there we're going to talk about and no, it's not about the volcano or global warming. It's about Alexa and what they're proposing trusting online reviews. This is a biggie, biggie, biggie, can you really trust them? And you know you go to a site like Amazon or eBay. And what do you see on there? You see people saying, Oh, this is the greatest thing ever. I love it. It's too big. And sometimes, oh, no, it's too small. It's never worked for me. How legitimate are those we rely on and those don't we know. We're going to talk a little bit about that China, they are doing some interesting things with pigs over there. you know, about the tracking that the law enforcement doing here to try and catch bad guys. And that makes sense, right? We want the bad guys caught on and off the street in London, the most surveilled city in the world, at least, it used to be, it's probably Shanghai nowadays. But in London, you can't go anywhere and not be caught on one of these closed-circuit cameras. Well they're doing
the same thing now and trying and with pigs. And we'll talk about why Android it kind of, you know, kudos to them. They've had all kinds of security issues they now have part of what's called Fido available on their devices is a fast identity thing, we'll talk about that and its use. We're just not gonna have enough time today, the Federal Trade Commission is ruling is find here a $5.7 million to a company that has an app called TikTok. And this is under the law that was passe, man it's been a few years now, I can't remember. I'm kind of looking through the article to see if it says when it came up at the COPA regulations, and it went beyond the statutory limits as to say that story. And storing health records now is a big business and Apple's trying to get into the game as, as Google and of course, many others, because there's so much money in it. But how about the privacy side of it is Apple going to continue to keep your data private. and in this case your medical data private.

We've got a note to this week, from one of the listeners to the podcast, he texted me and he was asking about this Momo challenge, then. So I want to bring that up as well. So a very busy day. Today, I'm going to try and keep these things short. But you know me I'll just have to explain them in a little bit to detail. So here we go.

Now, you've been online, I'm sure you've been to YouTube. This even made it onto most of the news sites is 24/7 news cycle that we have nowadays. But that bucket challenge writes the Ice Bucket Challenge. It was phenomenal. From a fundraising standpoint, it really helped to raise some funds for a very good cause. And the whole idea was, Hey, I'm going to get a bucket of water, I'm going to fill it with ice. And I'm going to dump it over my head. And it's part of a fundraising campaign where people would donate, you know, and if you do it I'll give you 10 bucks, or I'll donate 10 bucks to it. And so they did it, which is really kind of cool. I'm glad they did all of that.

Well, there's an internet home that's been around for a while now it is a hoax. But there is a problem with this as well. And it's called the Momo challenge. It's been spread by users on Facebook has been talked about in the media and different channels. And the whole idea behind this reporting is that children and teens are getting enticed by this username Momo, to ultimately commit suicide. And the whole concept is you start out small, you do some  you know, almost innocuous things, and then it gets keeps getting more and more violent. There's attacks and then eventually suicide. And it really reached worldwide proportions last summer, in July 2018, and the number of actual complaints was actually quite small. And there's no police force that is out there right now that I could find that reported that anybody was ever harmed as a result of this phenomena. no direct result, right? There could be other things and there's a great by the way page about this up on Wikipedia that you might want to check out.

But reports about this and the awareness of the digital challenge rose again this month after police in Northern Ireland posted a public warning on Facebook. And that's a problem it keeps popping up. As you know, we're actually concerned parents concerned police departments are trying to say hey, listen, everybody, keep an eye on what your kids are doing online because it could be very dangerous, which is very, very true. It could be. Let's see Momo WhatsApp messages apparently are being used to try and convince people to contact them and their cell phone there are some other ones out there known as blue whale where players quote unquote players are instructed to perform a succession of tasks and refusing to do so gets met with threats.

So, the messages are often accompanied by frightening or gory pictures. It really does appear to be a hoax. I've got a country by country breakdown where they have looked at this and the problems Quebec the police forces of the Longueuil, Sherbrooke, and Gatineau have indicated that people in their jurisdiction have been approached to participate in the Momo challenge. But there are no reports of any victims. They're asking people not to use a phone number provided in the WhatsApp messages to send screen captures and images of the of the phone to police authorities. Bottom line the phone numbers that have been used in these hoaxes just don't work. It goes through Columbia, Europe, Brazil, France, Germany, Luxembourg, India, Mexicoso pretty extensive run down and you'll find that online as well. Just look up Momo challenge over on Wikipedia. And thanks to the listener that sent in that question. It's a good question and good concerns. And it's hit the news cycle again, because of these police in Northern Ireland.

So next up here, let's talk about this new browser attack that has been hitting people.

Now one of the most interesting parts of this to me is it's not really a new attack. This particular type of attack was first documented in a research paper back in 2007, this new attack is called MarioNet. And what it does is it is opening the door for creating huge bought net and button that's are used to do a lot of things. They're used to attack businesses, somebody they don't like for their political opinion might be attacked with a botnet and the botnet then ends up sending just malicious data, basically, to whoever the intended victim is. So their website goes down, and they can no longer really conduct business at all. That's what a botnet that is there. They're also used for other types of attacks. And now the real big thing for botnets is called cryptojacking. And what cryptojacking does is it allows the bad guys to use your browser your machine in order to earn Bitcoin for themselves. And just oversimplifying it dramatically. Now, previous versions of this allowed you when you shut off your web browser, or close the window, get what it's no longer running. So the bad guys, we're not using your computer any longer. However, there is a new feature that has been added to the modern web browsers, it's using an API called service workers. And this allows the website to isolate the operation of the service worker from a web page. And the idea is that the web page UI isn't going to freeze up when it's processing a lot of data.

So you could go and this is there are legitimate purposes for this, you go to a website, and you wanted to have a look at something that a history of 23andMe type of site, for instance, I might do real-time live analysis, which 23andMe does not do, by the way, I don't want you to think poorly about them for that. But the service workers really are an update to an older API. But now this MarioNet, which is actually supposed to be pronounced to marionette, but it's spelled MarioNet, it's taken advantage of these things. It's a very silent attack, it doesn't require any user interaction at all the browsers on going to alert you about it, they're not going to ask for permission before registering your service worker. everything's happening under the browser's hood as the user waits for the website to load. And about, the only thing you're going to notice is that if it's used for cryptomining is that your machine is going to slow down, slow down a lot. But let some place malicious code on your high traffic websites gain a huge user base, it's it's a very scary thing. And there's not a whole lot that you can do about it, unfortunately. So the research is going on, it's been discovered. So, expect patches from all of the major vendors out there. And they will be hoping, hoping to have them fix this. Some vendors are course better at patching than others. And you already know who I think are some of the better ones. If you want privacy then the Epic browsers. Fantastic. The Google Chrome browser is the industry standard browser, frankly, very good browser. And Safari is very good. Dead last one you should never use is Microsoft Internet Explorer. They have their new Edge browser, which is nowhere near as bad as Internet Explorer. But Microsoft has come to realize that all other browsers are terrible. So Microsoft is switching over to Google Chrome. So in the future, the little IE button is going to launch the new Edge browser, which is not really IE Internet Explorer, nor is it edge it is actually Google Chrome. So how's that for a good time for all but at least Microsoft is finally realizing that they have no idea how to make a good web browser, right.

So let's talk a little bit here about your health record,

Great article that NPR has up, on their website about storing health records. I saw a lot of mentions of this all over the internet. So I had to have a look at it myself. And he, Well, he would back up a little bit. The author of this is Laura Sidell, and it's talking about Sam Cavalier, he's a San Diego tech worker. And he is using Apple's Health app. And a lot of us are, particularly people who have the Apple Watch, who might have some concerns about their cardiac rhythms. All of that stuff can be tracked now on your Apple device. So he's using the Apple Health app in order to keep track of his weight to his exercise routines, how many steps he takes a day find that really too when I'm going out and I'm walking, how far have I walked, where did I go, and I'll do the walk around the mall in the walk around the blocks. And it's really kind of nice to be able to see that and have that all tracked.

Well since March last year. So about a year now, Apple's had a feature that allows people to store their medical records as part of the Health app information. Then the University of California, San Diego health where this guy, the same guy goes to get his medical checkups, etc. But UC San Diego is one or more than 200 healthcare providers in the US who are using this new health records feature. He travels a lot for work, he likes to keep track, that was blood pressure. And he has a special confidence link to his health app. And he likes the convenience of having that app and really having all those records there with them. If you travel a lot, it's can be phenomenal to have all of your health records with you in case something were to happen, right? Doesn't that make sense? And then the doctor can also look at it and see what the trends are, and analyze where they're not, there might be some sort of a real problem with the guy's health that they may be want to have a look at.

Well, the global health industry is expected to reach $10 trillion by 2022, which is absolutely phenomenal. Just health alone is bigger than any economy of any country other than the US and China. And I mentioned earlier, we've got Apple who's in the foray, Google is in it. And so is Amazon and Microsoft, trying to get a piece of the medical pie in retail pharmacies, artificial intelligence for disease detection, and healthy living apps. And we've seen some of these apps, we've seen already that some of these computer programs are better at spotting skin cancer than even a cancer doctor is, that's actually pretty cool when you get right down to it. And they let you take a picture of moles, and they track the moles over time. And they look at the edges of the moles to see if they are real little rough, they look like there might be precancerous, etc. So the AI part of it, at least machine learning is really going to go a long way. And Apple has invested a lot in machine learning. If you have one of the newer iPhone models, it has a machine learning chip dedicated to machine learning built right into it kind of makes me wonder if maybe that's part of Apple's goal. That's why they put it in there. And part of the reason I should mention too is Apple tries not to send any data up to the cloud that it doesn't absolutely have to send up to the cloud. Which also means makes a ton of sense to me anyways. It's not like Google or Amazon that basically send everything up to the cloud for processing. Apple tries to process it locally, which is really good from a security standpoint.

So where are things going? I read a really great article about Apple and their direction just yesterday because a lot of people are saying, Hey, listen, iPhone sales are slowing down. Is this the end of apple? What should we be worrying about it? What should we be doing? And it turned out that no, no, no, none of those things were true. Apple is looking to get into the service areas. And one of them, of course, is health care.

Now, having privacy as a key like Apple does, and has done for quite a while is a big, big, big win for our friends over at Apple, because people are now used to expecting maybe that's even a better way to put it. People are expecting Apple to keep their data safe. And frankly, I think they will. Their CEO, Tim Cook's been very vocal about privacy rights. He also is really ticked off at Google and Facebook for making money off of user data, which is I know, I go back and forth on that.

But they certainly do keep it private. So how about you? What do you want to do? Do you want to give your medical data to any of these big companies, Facebook, or Amazon, Google, Microsoft or Apple, there are pros and cons to all of it. And the whole HIPAA regulations, that whole thing was supposed to make it so that our information would be digitized. And we could take it with us as we moved around the country or change doctors. But somehow that really hasn't come into fruition. Frankly, I don't know that it will, hey, I want to talk about this other thing right out of the universities. This is the University of Bergen. And we're going to talk about this conference over in Hawaii, and how this could have a huge, huge impact on our privacy.

There was a conference in Hawaii here recently. And they were talking about our fish, artificial listening devices. And we have those all over the place, we just found out that if you have a certain smart thermostat that's been on the market for a while that built into it was a microphone people had no idea it was there. And I personally don't like that idea, right. So it had a built-in microphone that was kind of hidden. Frankly, there's no mention of it in the marketing materials in the owner's manual, nothing. And then the company decided just about two weeks ago, hey, we're going to turn on that microphone so that you can ask questions and get things done. And it's a piece of hardware that Amazon had picked up through one of its acquisitions. So we have these we have the Amazon Alexa is we have our series, we have our Google Homes, and there will be many others, of course, coming over the years, I'm sure, but one of those three is probably going to be the winner. So we have these in our homes. We've already talked on the show about police departments who have since subpoenas to get the audio from these devices. And frankly, those subpoenas don't really go very far. Because they don't really have the audio from the devices, all they'll have is the audio for about 30 seconds after you give it the wake word whatever your wake word is. So in other words, you might wake it up by calling a computer or whatever might be, and it responds, it listens for up to 30 seconds, sends out audio up to the cloud words process tries to figure out what you're talking about. And then and then goes ahead and processes.

And I should mention too, that on that exact same front, a lot of people are upset with Apple, and how Siri just doesn't perform as well as Alexa does, for instance, or as Google Home does. And I want to remind everyone, again, it's a trade-off on privacy in the apple space. It's trying to do as much of the processing locally as it can. And so it doesn't have all the benefits of all of the cloud data that has been collected and stored and analyzed by the other competitors out there. So Apple, Apple is in a bit of a disadvantage because of their privacy stuff.

Anyhow, the devices are listening. So these scientists over at the University of Bergen decided, hey, let's do a little bit of study on these devices. Can we turn these into monitors for the home? And what they are suggesting is that these smart devices should have built into them in the future what they're calling a moral artificial intelligence so they're sitting there listening to what's going on they should be able to say wait a minute and it sounds like somebody's getting a beating, somebody's a whooping. Okay. And whooping weapon me not a great idea, right? But is frankly, the device really shouldn't be responsible to try and decide whether or not it should call the police on your behalf. I get it if you tell it if you wake it up and say you know, call the police it should right but if it's just listening does not sound like 1984 is in that very Orwellian where it's listening and it tries to make decisions based on all of this, right? It's, it's an interesting problem. If you ask me.

The University of Cambridge has stepped in and made their little comment saying humans and human situations are far messier than what the scientists over there from Norway, University of Bergen has been really saying and contemplating. Because you think about family and family dynamics, and there can be some pretty heated arguments, but that doesn't mean that there's a crime committed or someone was particularly harmed and when we see some agencies being very, very ready to just grab children and run away and then investigate later is is it something that's legitimate, something we should be doing? We had in the UK in April 2018, the House of Lords artificial intelligence committee said that ethics need to be put at the center of the development of AI so there you go. And Britain they're poised to become a world leader in the controversial technology field of you guessed it moral artificial intelligence. And remember, I said the Londoners are some of the most surveilled people in the world. It's very, very interesting. Also, in the UK, they are European actually parliament, they are looking at creating a legal status for robots. And it goes on and on. We have a lot of things we've got it assigned on over the next few years when it comes to artificial intelligence tracking us. And this whole concept of moral artificial intelligence, which frankly, really kind of scares me.

Well, I don't want this article to just go away. We have a couple of minutes left here. And today's show. So let's talk about this. This is called Fido, it's been around a little while. If you use your key or some of these other hardware tokens, many of them tie into Fido. And the idea behind Fido is to have a mechanism that gets rid of a password. That's the bottom line here, password list web. And that's the goal. So if you go on to the Internet, and you go to a particular website, the idea is that you can use this Fido certification to figure out if it's really the person that says it is right. So automated Google Play Services update is going to push that to your device. If you have that turned on. You can this is for Android, obviously they can log in with other forms of authentication compatible with final to spec like the yubi keys are or Google Titan. Titan was an internal project at Google, they use it for life getting into all of their devices. And now they are marketing that it's available for purchase. So have a look at that as well. We're helping a lot of businesses move over to start using hardware keys, particularly in the medical and legal realms, where access to information is severely limited on the legal side, right.

So let's see final two supports can allow Android to accept secure web logins using these devices including Bluetooth by the way so you can use your smartphone as part of your identifier Google's anticipating fingerprint nothing authentication will be the easiest way just like to become the users preferred method and in this case it doesn't send your fingerprint to the website the fingerprint is analyzed locally and then there is a cryptographically secure handshake that occurs between the website and your final compatible device anyways, there's a lot there. Naked Security blog had a very good article on this if you're interested. It's up on my website as well. http://CraigPeterson.com.

But that's it for now. I had a couple of really great webinars this week. I want to mention one for the FBI Infragard. This is their National Cyber camp program and it's really really kind of cool so I did a whole webinar on that for the leaders in all of the 80 Plus Local in for guard chapters. But as you're thinking about summer and summer programs and camps, have a look at that if you are an InfraGard member and if you're not, check it out Infragard.org. You'll find out more there, about what they're doing with this whole FBI related program. So, that's it for this week. Have a great week. And we'll be chatting again soon. You've been listening to Craig Peterson and all of this can be found at http://CraigPeterson.com. Bye-bye.

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Related articles:

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Alexa, Call The Police! Smart Assistants Should Come With A ‘Moral Ai’ To Decide Whether To Report Their Owners For Breaking The Law, Experts Say

Can You Trust Online Reviews? Here’s How To Find The Fakes

China’s Tech Firms Are Mapping Pig Faces

FTC Ruling Sees Musical.Ly (Tiktok) Fined $5.7m For Violating Children’s Privacy Law, App Updated With Age Gate

Storing Health Records On Your Phone: Can Apple Live Up To Its Privacy Values?

Android Nudges Passwords Closer To The Cliff Edge With Fido2 Support

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Mar 1, 2019

It's Friday! Time for another Security Thing podcast. Craig talked about the Apex Human Capital Management's ransomware attack.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 03/01/2019

Apex Capital Destroyed By Ransomware - They Thought They Knew What They Were Doing

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey everybody. Craig Peterson here. We got a Security Thing today I want to talk about and this is a company called Apex Human Capital Management. You are just not going to believe this. Now I've been telling you for ever and if you're part of my master course I've gone through in some detail the best way to protect yourself your business from these extortionists that are running these ransomware attacks against us? Well, Mama in this case this happened February 19, 2019.

So a week ago at least from the time I'm recording this and man did they get nailed now they were pretty proud of themselves over there because they just put in place a let me see if I can get it exactly. There's a quote from them: "We had just recently completed a pretty state of the art disaster recovery plan off site and out of state that was mirroring our live system." Well, a real security expert would tell you that you are an idiot if you think that that sort of backup is going to protect you from ransomware. Mirroring a live system is great for having your power go out. For losing a server in your main data center it's great. Having a storm hit you it's great a tree fall on your data center, it's great. Ransomware, you're dead. Because you are mirroring the ransomware. So once it starts encrypting your systems, guess what is happening. It's encrypting your live recovery site, whether it's out of state or in state it doesn't matter. It's encrypting your live recovery site. And that's what backup 3-2-1 is all about. That's why I teach that. And on top of 3-2-1, I teach grandfather, father and son going back at least three years in most cases, businesses have to go back seven years in order to comply with taxes and if you are a legal firm you really have to go back about 10 years and that's becoming the standard.

So if they had done what they should have done Roswell, Georgia based Apex Human Capital Management who does payroll for multiple companies looks like they also had the ability to do outsourced leased employees, employee leasing. They have, they service some 350 payroll service bureaus that all that in turn, provide payroll services to small and mid sized businesses completely out of business. They could not carry on business. So Krebs On Security reached out to them for comment and they comment I read you is from their CMO, the chief marketing officer, interestingly enough, right? So they had hired two "outside security firms". They didn't hire me, you know, they don't get where they get these people from. They call themselves a security firm. They put some great quotes on their website, and somehow they get hired. I don't get it.

But apparently, by February 20, the consensus among all three was that paying the ransom was the fastest way to get back online. So what does Apex do because I always say, Hey, don't pay the ransom. In fact, you don't need to pay the ransom because we've got you covered. We've got the live hot backups, we've got multi generational backups, we can go back and restore files that were encrypted and from the last state, in fact, we even do snapshot backups. So we can instantly restore a whole machine to the state before the ransomware started running. And by the way, if you have the right kind of security, you will never get ransomware anyways. It's almost impossible. And if you do get it, it won't spread. We just had that last week. We had a client was data exfiltration, the systems automatically noticed it and bam! Shut it down right away. That's what should be happening, especially with a company like this. Can you imagine how many records they have? They have some 350 payroll service bureaus that use these guys and they're idiots when it comes to the security obviously, are you kidding me?

So they pay the ransomware and guess what they said they paid the ransom in, "In respect for clients who needed to get their businesses out up and running that was going to be obviously the quicker path". How about doing it right the first time?

Quote goes on when they encrypt the data that happens really fast. He said, when they gave us the keys to decrypt it, things didn't go quite as cleanly. One of Apex's business units, called ACA on demand is still offline. The company is now offering to move customers to a different platform and to train the customers and how to use this other platform. It's absolutely nuts because when they tried to do the decryption once they paid the ransom, instead of restoring all of the files and folders to their pre-encrypted state to decryption process broke countless file directories and rendered many executable files inoperable causing even more delays.

So this is a company that makes tens of millions of dollars a year they have professional it people on staff professional security people and they don't get it right. It drives me nuts. If your IT guy says you're all set. Let's talk about the reality of the situation. You probably aren't. Then if your IT guy says there's no way to stop this, I can't be 100% sure that we are secure because there's always a way around it. And he might be trying to be terribly honest because in the way he or she is right. There's no way to be 100% secure but you can be five nine secure. 99.999% secure and we do it every day. It's just a shame that this is what we're seeing out there. So rest in peace, Apex Human Capital Management. They are going to be in for a rough ride as they try and get their business back. Just incredible.

Anyways Take care guys will be back tomorrow with my weekend radio show as well as we put up right here as a podcast you can subscribe by going to http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. I appreciate it when you do that, because it helps to lift our ranking and that helps to make it more available. People know about the show more so by all means, subscribe to the podcast, http://CraigPeterson.com /iTunes and leave a comment there on the iTunes site. Hopefully I owned a five star review from you. Take care. We'll be back tomorrow.

 

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Feb 28, 2019

It's another It's a Security Thing Thursday. Craig talked about why businesses feel vulnerable to security attacks and what they can do about it.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles 

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/28/2019

Why Business Feels Vulnerable To Security Attacks

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey everybody. Craig Peterson here. This is a little bit of a Security Thing today and it's all about two thirds of businesses. What are they thinking? You know, I've got a new section on my website at http://CraigPeterson.com that is all about security breaches and why they occurred. And I think it's really important for people to understand what's really happening out there. So that's why we're doing it. My wife and I've been putting a lot of work into that. But one of the articles that we have up there right now is from Infosecurity Magazine, and it's talking about how to in three, that's two thirds of organizations say that they are not convinced that they can avoid a breach. Now to me, that's a very big deal. I just don't get it. This was a Parliament Institute survey that was done of 600 cyber security leaders and professionals in these organizations. Now these people were people who are responsible for evaluating, selecting or implementing security solutions. And those are the only people who are supposed to take part in the survey. So it should be a pretty legitimate survey when it comes to understanding are these companies really positive about the outlooks or negative about the outlooks?

Now I can tell you that the software we use for our bigger clients is designed to be really is designed to be 100% safe, and it's better than 99.9% safe statistically after billions of attempts to hack it. Quite literally billions. It never been never been broken through.

So I know personally that there are ways to make sure that you aren't broken into. But here we go with these numbers. This is a quote right from the article vulnerability management particularly those vulnerabilities and unseen or unpatched systems is an issue for many organizations was 69% of respondents identify and delayed patching is an issue. 63% admitting they are not able to respond to alert.

Now I have seen both of these as real big problems and they may be problems for you too because delayed patching is a problem in some areas of the business more than it is in other areas of the business so for instance if you have a really good next generation firewall like what, again I keep coming back to what we're using right, but there's Cisco their Firepower firewall family ties in with their switches, ties in with the software on your computers to help make it so that if something does happen, it recognizes almost instantly.

So what they're talking about, really here are zero day attacks. In other words, attacks have never been seen before, all the way through attacks that maybe have been out there for six months like Equifax and they got hacked because they didn't patch and that's a real problem. It's a real problem and patching organizations don't do because it can mess things up. So let's say that you're a small organization. And if you're a small organization, you are probably running a website, but you're probably not doing it yourself. You probably didn't write the software for your website from scratch. Most likely you're using WordPress, or maybe Drupal which has turned into be quite the security nightmare.

But let's say you're using Wordpress. How much patching do you need to do nowadays WordPress will patch itself and there are plugins you can put into WordPress that will not only make sure the core WordPress is up to date, but all of your modules, all of the things that you've installed in WordPress, all these plugins, it'll make sure they're all up to date as well. And it does it all automatically. So rule one, make sure those are in place. And just this week it was Monday night, I guess. I don't know it was over the weekend. That's what it was. We started getting alarms from our Firepower systems telling us that we were under attack and they were trying to use some vulnerabilities in some of the common software that used on the web. And it was the software that's typically used by bigger companies. It was some middleware attacks that were underway and it recognized them, it stopped them. 

In fact this week no I think you but it's been a bad week for a tad attacks. We stopped a one of our customers. It's a fairly small company that is a very small company. But we have this technology in place for them because they are concerned about about breaches. And for some reason, over the weekend, when people are usually not there, because part of what we do is monitor when they're working, what are they doing when they're working? And what's abnormal? Well, we saw some abnormal stuff happening. And it was very abnormal stuff because they were sending files to a public file sharing service over on Google.

And so again, automated systems took over and it was stopped almost instantly, which is again a very big deal a very good deal very positive thing. So we're meeting with them today to talk about what happened, the incident and how it was responded to and who was trying to breach what, you know, how did this happen? How could this happen? And it kind of smells like it was probably an insider who was just doing something that, you know, hopefully not malicious because many times your insiders will try and steal customer lists or plans or diagrams and other things and share them with someone else. And as part of that sharing, of course, they get a little remuneration right? They get a few bucks sent their way so that might have been what happened and and the reason we didn't meet with them right away is one they the CEO was very busy this week and two, we stopped it. So what's with these two thirds of companies that think they can't stop it? Well, they probably have an antivirus mentality because antivirus does not work anymore. You need a much more integrated, much larger response mechanism in place and needs to be completely automated in order to really stop the bad guys nowadays.

But secondly I have to feel for them because you have an additional problem. And that is if you wrote the software for your business. In other words, a company like Equifax has huge department with programmers and analysts and stuff. So they write their software, they have to maintain it. So let's say they're using Apache Struts. And there is an Apache Struts attack, which is what actually happened to us this weekend. Now, in our case, it was stopped. But in many cases, it just won't be stopped. And it can't be stopped because they don't have the right stuff in place. So there's a Struts to attack because they haven't patch well why didn't they patch because they have to test their whole system. An integrated test, right? And that integrated test has to look at every component try it all tested all so it might take six months to do a patch because you can't just throw it in place. So an organization like that where you are writing your own software, I would highly advise you have one of these fully integrated systems like what we have in place for many of our clients now.

So that's what I wanted to point out. Two thirds of businesses think that they just can't avoid a breach. In fact, you can avoid a breach, it doesn't matter the size of the organization. And if your people are telling you, you can't avoid a breach, they are wrong. Okay, they either don't know what they're talking about. Or they're being way, way, way, way too honest. Because there's always a chance that there is a breach or potential breach. But based on the responses from these guys where they're saying that the obstacles are really the mitigation and patching mitigation. You can take care of patching, you can kind of take care of but you can mitigate all of these risks by using the right kinds of systems. So anyways, that's a little bit of a security thing for today.

I'm a little disappointed to see this come out I'm glad Kacy Zurkus wrote this article you'll find her on on Twitter as well as LinkedIn and the articles up on my website at http://CraigPeterson.com. You'll also find it over at Infosecurity Magazine. Take care. We'll talk to you a little bit later.

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Feb 27, 2019

Craig is on the WGAN Morning News with Ken and Matt. They talked about Zillow helping to flip houses, the YouTuber who discovered a pedophile ring in YouTube, and an app that might help stop you from procrastinating.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Related Articles:

Youtuber Claims Online Pedophile Ring Operates Freely On Youtube

Prevent Procrastination With This Chrome Extension

Zillow Wants To Flip Your House

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/27/2019

Keeping Your Family Safe Online

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hi, Craig Peterson here. Have you ever wondered how you can keep your kids off the dark web or maybe what you can do for free, that's going to really help keep the ransomware off of your machine out of your house, out of your very small business. So hope and do it all for free. While that's one of the things I talked about this morning with Ken and Matt. It's also something we're doing a deep dive on this week in my course on DIY cyber security. So here we go. Learn how to do it right now.

Unknown 0:36
Well, guess what? We're back again. It's Wednesday at 7:38. And it's Craig Peterson time. He's here to join us to talk about all things technology. Craig, how are you this morning?

Unknown 0:45 
Hey, good morning. Doing well. Looking forward to 20 whole degrees this afternoon.

Unknown 0:50 
That's a heatwave. We're having a heatwave. Tropical heatwave. But you know, I don't know that much. You know, I want to stay inside. It's cold outside and I thought I don't have anything else to do. Why don't I go look at the dark web and see what's there. Is that a good idea?

Unknown 1:05
The dark web is an interesting place and there's there's a few ways to get on to it. But basically it's probably 90, 95% maybe even worse on the bad side. This is where the Silk Road website was and those the Silk Road website was a place where people would go and they could buy drugs illegally online if they can factor all kinds of illegal activities activity and it was tracked down. They were using bitcoin and and other types of currencies out there in order to do a little trading back and forth and they thought they were safe because it was on the dark web in the dark web supposedly is like 100% faith and they were using bitcoin cryptocurrency because that's supposed to be untrackable as well.

But I attended a really interesting lecture by the Secret Service talking about how they tracked it all down. And they arrested the guy that was running the Silk Road there on the dark web. And it's it's not a safe place. There are all kinds of nastiness that we're not going to get into right now, including things told read rooms and others that have questionable at best backgrounds to them. So you do, generally speaking, want to avoid the dark web. It is a place for various types of political activists as well. Good guys and bad guys together and do a little communications but it's also the place where they're trading our personal information. They're selling it online. I just checked it. I had a webinar that I ran to the FBI Infragard program just this week and So we went on to the dark web and poke around a little bit. And we found all kinds of stuff, including software you can use to hack people's computers for as little as $1.99 US. It's kind of a scary place, you might not want to go there Ken.

Unknown 3:16
So I should go now.

Unknown 3:19
Yeah, exactly. That's why we're not really telling them how to get out to the dark web. Because I'm sure there's some kids out there that might want to go there. And as a parent, you kind of want to keep an eye on this. It doesn't look any different. They're still going to use web browsers are still going to use the web browsers are probably already using although you can certainly use other web browsers kind of depending. But it's kind of hard to police as a parent as to where your kids are going online. That's why I really advise it. And this is part of this week's course that I'm doing. I really advise people use something called OpenDNS. There is a free version online. It's O-P-E-N-D-N-S. And I can send you more info if you want about it. But what that does is it allows you to reconfigure your web browser shows you how to do it that your web browser but your computer it shows you how to do it. They're on their website. Once you start using this it will stop your kids from going on to places like the dark web. It automatically blocks pornographic sites. And it also helps to completely almost completely eliminate ransomware. Open DNS is where you'll find it online. http://OpenDNS.com, they have a paid version which you know, it's probably a really good idea to use. And if you're a little bit more advanced, you can also use a version a version that's only 40 bucks a year and it allows you to reconfigure your router in your home so that even if your kid is a little more technically advanced and knows how to get into the DNS settings of the router in your home who is going to give out OpenDNS for every device, including those nasty Internet of Things, devices in your homes or in your small business.

If you're a larger business, you should use Umbrella. But you have to get that from special vendors like like myself, as it turns out, but the OpenDNS stuff is absolutely fantastic. If you do configured on your router in your home, it's going to help protect your whole a whole home and it'll keep Ken from going to the dark web.

Unknown 5:31 
Which he's known to do.

Unknown 5:34 
Nothing can stop me from it.

Unknown 5:34
He'll go hell or high water. Right. We're going to talk to you here. Craig Peterson here a little bit more about technology as we do every Wednesday at this time. Craig, you know, I was looking through some of these stories to talk to you about today. One of them stood out to me, the the Zillow flip house thing is pretty interesting to me because I've always been trying to figure out exactly how accurate these things are in the first place when they're sort of estimating home value because if some of these things are right then, boy, I'm sitting on a pile of cash right now.

But there are people that are exploiting the, the, like the Zillow and places like it on the internet that basically value your house and and look at things to like look for values to flip. Why don't you talk to me about the story a little bit?

Unknown 6:18 
Yeah you've got an interesting angle on it too when you're talking about this, Matt, because the question is how do you get a good value for your house? You go to someone who wants to buy your house and say, yeah, I'll pay 50 grand for you go to somebody who maybe wants to buy your house for the low price or somebody who wants to sell your house for a commission who says yes, yes, this was 75 grand and then you sit on it for a year or two or three because they've overvalued the house because they want to get every penny of commission out of it they possibly can get right and so that's your I think that's kind of part of your premise, Matt.

Is Zillow legit? Is the price that they're saying correct? And they've got these estimates on the Zillow site. I love Zillow. I poke around on it quite frequently, especially when I'm traveling to see what local real estate prices are. So, Zillow has been doing that for a while they use public records and they try and compare your house do to other houses in the area and come up with a reasonable price. But now with all of the flipping that's been going on they're taking a little bit of a different angle which is kind of cool you know there's all these show shows I don't know about you if you watch some I know my wife and kids love these shows on the Home and Garden TV I think it is, that is how to flip your house right? There's a couple that in Waco, Texas. Magnolia I think his name of their company and they buy homes and small buildings, business buildings and fix them up and and then turn around and sell them. And there are constantly people out there with the training programs on how to buy homes with no money down and then fix them up and flip them. And my wife and I looked at that at one point. And we actually went to one of these weekend webinars or seminars, I should say, and we learned a lot, but we didn't feel comfortable enough to do it.

So what's happening now with Zillow. Zillow has these estimates you mentioned. They call them Zestimates. And what Zillow is doing now is they're thinking that their database is so good that they will allow you now to go on to the website. Depending on where you are. You can look up your home and see what the value of it might be. And then you can ask Zillow, Hey, I want to get out of my house right now. I want you to buy my house from me. And so Zillow will kind of backup their Zestimate as to what your house is worth and they will buy the house and then sell it for you and what they're going to do, once you sign up with them to do this as they'll send someone out to just double check, make sure there aren't some major defects in the house that they don't know about. They will give you a very hard offer for your house. And then they'll chart you between 6 and 9% for that house for commission which is a lot more. It's almost double what most real estate companies will charge you and they they're done you're out of your house and they can just take a matter of days. And then Zillow will come in and they'll have a crew come in and fix up things that need to be fixed. Paint it up and resell your house.

So it's interesting to me to see hey wow. Now the internet is is really putting his money where his mouth is in the case of Zillow. They will backup that estimate for your house they will buy your house and you can be out of that house the matter of well, however long that however long it to do a quick inspection and the closing So, Matt, it's an interesting angle.

Unknown 10:06
We're talking to Craig Peterson our tech guru joins us, Wednesdays at 7:38. You can always go to http://CraigPeterson.com and get all the information if you can't wait to hear him on Wednesday at 7:38. You know some people believe that Matt procrastinate quite a bit. I'm not one of those people. But there are many people who think they procrastinate.

Unknown 10:26
I disagree, but I'll get to it later.

Unknown 10:28 
Is there an extension that he can do to kind of help him on this. I'm trying to help him.

Unknown 10:31 
Yeah, there's a few different things that I've used in the past that I really liked when it comes to help him with procrastination. I use something called Vitamin-R and it allows you to break your day into chunks of it. All you're really focused on at that point is what am I going to do for the next 20 minutes or so. And it's based on a message that came out of the mentality and method and the result there's whole books written on

This, but the idea is let's go ahead and focus and let's focus for short periods of time. Let's accomplish something, take a five minute break and then move on. And there is a new extension now for Chrome that is come out. It's called HabitLab and you'll find it online. I have it up on my website as well. And if you're kind of compulsive, if you're always kind of poking around on different websites, you get distracted at work or at home. This is going to be interesting for you. Yeah, I think you should have looked at it. It's based on some research that came out of Stanford University and they have all kinds of encouragement in HabitLab, some of them kind of gentle the two back on track other ones just going so far as to say no, you can't go to Facebook or wherever it is, but it really can be a time saver. A big one for people depending on what you want to do. It's got nudges built in based on the book called Nudge, which was really popular with Hillary Clinton and the Obamas to try and get people to do things. But it's based on all of that technology, some more research that came out of Stanford. And if you are online and you have the Chrome browser that you're using, have a look at it. It's called HabitLab, Ken, and it'll help you get your work done, and it'll help you from procrastinating as well. It's really kind of cool.

Unknown 12:33
We're talking to our friend Craig Peterson, our tech guru is here to talk to us about technology. Craig, you only have about a minute, two minutes to answer this question. But there's a YouTuber out there who is scaring some parents about a pedophile ring that might be operating around YouTube. Is this true? Should I be running and screaming in terror? 

Unknown 13:01
Well, man, this is something that I wish we didn't have to talk about. Well my whole tone has changed. You can probably tell about a week ago Matt Watson who is a YouTuber exposed what he's called it a wormhole into the soft core pedophilia ring and what these guys were apparently doing or are apparently doing is encouraging young kids who are under 13 years of age to post a compromising basically pictures of themselves on YouTube videos of them. Now I mentioned that 13 year age because of the fact that YouTube has a policy against people under 13 posting online. In fact I don't think they can have an account. And yet these were accounts controlled by kids under 13 and posting these pictures and these videos which means if parents were allowing them access to smartphones, were allowing them to have a YouTube account we're monitoring this close enough, but Watson's claiming he found links to actual child porn on the site. We had YouTube ads being pulled by dozens of major corporations when this came out. For some reason that didn't really hit the news, but within less than 24 hours, there is a whole hashtag campaign about this. If you're a Twitter user, check out the YouTube white top hashtag campaign. So it has hurt substantially YouTube's bottom line. Hopefully they'll do something about it. And frankly, just enforcing this under 13 years of age. You're not allowed to include these kids in any videos and they're not allowed to have any accounts. Just enforcing their existing policy would stop this ring. Hopefully people are waking up and complaining to YouTube and YouTube is going to really do something about it this time. 

Unknown 15:00
Alright. Craig Peterson our tech guru joins us Wednesdays at this time to go over the world of technology. Craig, as always, thank you very much. And we will talk to you next week sir. 

Unknown 15:00
Take care, gentlemen. Thanks.

Hey, if you are in my course here, the master course on DIY cybersecurity. I just want a quick note. Sorry I had hoped to get stuff out yesterday. It looks like it's going out first thing this morning. At least the first part of it I put way more work into it than I thought I would. Because it as I was going through some of this course material for this module, I realized that it could be really confusing for some people. So I went seriously above and beyond on this but it's taken me about another day. So sorry about that. But I think you're going to like the results. It's really going to help you just walk right through in making frankly all your computers and your business and your home a lot safer. So anyways quick apology to those people and we will be back hopefully tomorrow will be able to do another one of my real quick here security things so stick around. We'll have more here on this podcast. Bye bye.

---

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www.craigpeterson.com

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Feb 26, 2019

What is the dark web? What will you find in the dark web? Craig is on today on the Jim Polito show as they discussed the dark web, the pedophilia ring that a YouTuber discovered, and how Facebook uses its apps to track users.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

What Is The Dark Web? How To Access It And What You’ll Find

Facebook Uses Its Apps To Track Users It Thinks Could Threaten Employees And Offices

Youtuber Claims Online Pedophile Ring Operates Freely On Youtube

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/26/2019

What Is The Dark Web - Who Created It

Craig Peterson: 0:00
We had a really good webinar yesterday. Craig Peterson here for the Infragard. It's kind of cool looking at some of the patterns and what people are interested in. Yesterday, we were talking about the difference between cyber and cyber enabled crimes. Very, very hot topic. The other real hot topic that we discussed, in fact, the number one topic in the last year on the FBI Infragard webinars I've been running. The number one topic has been dark web. And that's kind of interesting, because that's what we talked about today with Jim Polito. Some history here behind the dark web. And why did the government create this thing? So here we go with Mr. Polito.

Unknown 0:47
The man who knows it all our good friend and Tech Talk guru Craig Peterson. Good morning, sir.

Unknown 0:55
Hey, good morning, Jim. How y'all?

Unknown 0:58
You're from Canada. Don't say y'all just just because you travel the country frequently.

Unknown 1:07
Isn't this the deep south? Isn't that how y'all talk down here

Unknown 1:09
For you technically it's the deep south.

Unknown 1:12
Yeah

Unknown 1:14
Speaking of the deep south, let's see Facebook which has nothing to do with the deep south uses its app to track users it thinks could threaten employees and offices. Wait a minute. So Facebook can't you know a tell me can't the tell me whether or not a real post is actually offensive or just a lot of people complained about it. But they can tell me when there's going to be like an attack at work. And not that I'm making light of that.

Unknown 1:55
It's kind of interesting. There's two interesting stories kind of along the same lines as this week. The Facebook one and then YouTube one both of which are how come they can police things they want to police but they can't police these things they don't want.

Unknown 2:10
Right? Exactly good. That's what I was trying to say. But I'm not as smart as you.

Unknown 2:18
It's interesting to look at. And that's a lot of interesting in one paragraph but to look at what Facebook is doing, and that is they have a whole security team that just cracking people who might who might threaten their employees or some of the physical offices. So for instance, there was a threat against their offices over in Europe. And Facebook picked on that really, really quickly. And CNBC ended up doing a story about it because they had more than a dozen former Facebook employees who said that Facebook is mining its social net

Unknown 3:00
Work for threatening comments against Facebook wow some cases it uses its products which are of course the Facebook app the Facebook never use it VPN that using its products to track the location of people it believes present a credible threat now this is incredibly Big Brother-esque here bottom Yeah, yeah and Facebook's other employees are out there and you know Facebook's management is saying well listen it's only legitimate Every business has physical security. We have a physical security team why wouldn't we do it? But you know when when you get right down to a Jim. Why aren't they doing this sort of thing for threats against other people warning people about it. Why aren't they reporting all of this stuff to the local police departments? Why are they trying to do it themselves.

Unknown 4:00
And why are they using their app to track these people basically without their knowledge that Facebook thinks might be a threat to themselves in this? That's where I think they really crossed the line.

Unknown 4:15
Wow. Wow. We're talking with our good friend Craig Peterson, our Tech Talk guru and at the end of this segment I'll give you, well Craig will give you a number and you'll be able to get this information plus a whole lot more. Could this ever help you know I mean, is there any way that they could use this to help him in always in almost in a bit of remember the science fiction movie Minority Report where someone Yeah, predict someone was going to commit a crime and you'd be arrested before you committed the crime and... what?

Unknown 5:01
Future crime became a crime in itself. If you are going to do that.

Unknown 5:05
You are going to commit a crime? Yeah. Which is completely contrary to our Constitution. But all right, Craig, let's suspend disbelief here for a little bit. Could you know police use this kind of modeling to see where they may be spikes in crime? Could Facebook use the same kind of stuff?

Unknown 5:26
That's why like you, you really are brilliant because you're pulling together a whole bunch of pieces. And one of the pieces that should enter into this fray here is the fact that there is already pre crime type technology in place. Then they're using it in New York City. They're using it Los Angeles. My last I heard Boston might be using this but what it is it looks at trends. It looks at social media feeds.

Unknown 6:00
To try and find agitators to try and predict where a crime is going to occur and then the police departments are using that kind of pre crime information to have police officers and units and even in some cases SWAT teams on the standby in that area because this machine learning system this are you know not quite artificial intelligence is predicting crimes there so you combine that technology that already is there is already in the field with the ability of somebody like Google or Facebook is what we're talking about right now who does collect all of this information who does sell all of this information put it all into a pot and stir it and Jim it's a civil libertarians worst nightmare.

Unknown 7:00
Yeah, I can see that. I mean it's like fire it's the good and the bad unfortunately you've destroyed your reputation by saying Jim you're brilliant I mean that's you know Craig we all know you're brilliant but if you're going to say that I'm brilliant people gonna say I don't know if I completely trust Craig Peterson. and his intellect i don't know if I.

Unknown 7:22
Most people Jim they're not thinking it through right and that's the brilliance of brilliance is seen through just the normal short term thought process. And nowadays the average millennial has a an attention span less than that of a goldfish. We're talking five or six seconds so how would somebody like that going to think the next order through and that's where the brilliance comes in Jim in and it's absolutely necessary to think this through what's the ultimate outcome, right of this type of technology?

And then look at the story on YouTube this region where we've got YouTube now ads pulled from companies like McDonald's, Disney, Grammarly. Chromebook, Purina, IKEA, Glad, GNC, Lysol. Now why did those ads get pulled? This is a story that's not really making the news but it turns out that there was a pedophilia ring, a pretty big one, a soft core pedophilia ring running on YouTube, and apparently YouTube kind of knew about it, trying to should have done something about it and absolutely didn't. So this YouTuber guy, his name's Matt Watson. Yeah, he exposed what he's calling a wormhole into this ring on the YouTube platform. He uploaded a video a week ago Sunday about all of this stuff, and it's disgusting to look at. I don't want to get into any of the details but it's right there in the open on YouTube. So you talk about Facebook tracking users is threatened Facebook and and the Facebook is insane, seemingly doing much about anything else who got YouTube now with some of the most important stuff you can imagine out in the open and it gets it so bad that advertisers have to pull their advertising to try and make YouTube do something about it. And it really makes you wonder where we're going.

Unknown 10:00
Wow, we're talking with Craig Peterson. Our Tech Talk guru. At the end of this segment will give you a number you can get all this information for free. Plus other stuff when there's a crisis. I'll explain to you how you do it. There's no obligation All right, this is a question people ask me all the time and I give them a half baked explanation. But let's get it from the guy who's an expert at explaining the technical aspects of the web in a simple way that most people can understand, probably because you wrote some of the language, some of the code for the web that's still in use today. But what is the dark web? Almost sounds like that old dark shadows. That soap opera horror. So what is the dark web?

Unknown 10:27
It does, doesn't it? Well, there, there are multiple parts to the internet. But you can think of it like an iceberg. The dark dark web and the business web are both the part that's underwater, in other words, is a part you don't see the internet inside businesses is bigger than the internet anyone else can see. And the number of apps in fact that are in use outside of the public curve, you are actually outnumber the number of apps available in the app store.

Unknown 11:01
So so there's this huge underwater component of the iceberg when it comes to the internet. And there's really two parts to that. there's what's called the dark web. It's kind of a generic term. And believe it or not, the dark web was set up the effectively by our government and our tax dollars still maintain it. And the idea behind the dark web was how do we let people who are in these countries where there's heavy oppression in Iran, etc, etc. How do we let these militants communicate with each other and communicate with us, our military or the State Department, etc. So we developed this this dark web concept around Tor and some other technologies to allow these people to be able to communicate.

Unknown 11:51
Oh wait a minute. I got it right now. So the government put this together for good and it's been taken over by the identity theft people the people you just talked about pedophilia and YouTube that's where pedophiles trade video in this dark web which was created for good and where did it, where is it ended up?

Unknown 12:19
Well it is created for good it's still used for good but the overwhelming use of the dark web is really a lot of different types of criminal activity in this day and age frankly. So now there's a conundrum here for the federal government. Do do we shut this down which they can't do by the way there's no way they could shut it down because it was designed to be unsettled and shut down a

Unknown 12:46
They did too good of a job you mean it was a government contract that did too good of a job. Yeah, exactly. So and they still want militants to be able to use it. So it's kind of stuck though there's a really interesting article on CSL online that I put up on my website that goes into this because not all of the dark web is bad. Not all of the tools by militants but if you do go out on to that dark web Be careful because it's easy to stumble on stuff that will make your eyeballs pop out.

Unknown 13:18
Yeah. Oh the real bad stuff the really really bad stuff that people want to be able to share. It's like the back alley of the internet, isn't it?

Unknown 13:33
It really is. You know, this is a place where people like Bob Kraft might find another a new massage parlor

Unknown 13:46
Oh. So wrong on so many levels. But ok, I'll let it go.

Unknown 13:51
We also have out there have been some of these sites like the Silk Road and things where people were buying and trading drugs and they was shut down. These people were caught. So just because it's on the dark web, just because you're using cryptocurrencies doesn't mean that the FBI or the Secret Service or other guys can track you down because they can and they do. So keep that in mind as well. It's a scary place to go. There are a lot of dark alleys out there we keep an eye on some parts of the dark web so that we know what's going on. And if there's something major that's where we find these huge cracks when when you know one of these places is broken into that's where we find that and that's what we use it for. But you know as a general rule, Jim they away from the dark web.

Unknown 14:45
So, you know, teach us how to access it, which is good, but at least we know what it is and why it was created. It's kind of a back alley for the government to communicate with individuals who are in countries where they don't allow the internet and yet Then it got co opted by the bad guys all right I promised that I would give you a full well that Craig would give you a phone number and you'd be able to get this information plus a whole lot other stuff you get on Craig's list. Hey, Craigslist. Hey that's pretty good I just made a pun there well good register that yeah might be a little late. But anyway you get on Craig's mailing list. How about we say that and he sends you information without annoying you. He doesn't do it constantly. But the good thing is when there's a big problem like a big hack, he tells you what to do. And it's all free. So Craig, the number that people should text my name to is what?

Unknown 15:47
It is 855-385-5553 that's 855-385-5553.

Unknown 16:00
Standard data and text rates apply and again it's it's great to get the service but Craig it's better to get you in person every Tuesday here and we appreciate your time We hope you have a great day.  Thank you. Thank you to talk to you next week.

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Thanks, everyone, for listening and sharing our podcasts. We're really hitting it out of the park. This will be a great year! 

More stories and tech updates at:

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Feb 25, 2019

Craig is on with Jack Heath as they talked about the presidential candidate who is trying to fend off the unemployment riots.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/25/2019

Presidential Candidate And Unemployment Riots

Craig Peterson 0:00
Good morning, everybody. Very, very busy putting together all of this course material. It is really kind of fun. And it's fun helping out all of these people who signed up. We're covering a bunch of things. This last weekend. We spent the whole weekend and module last week, but in together a whole set of modules real, it's one module, but it's multiple sections in the module on securing Windows devices, Macintosh devices, mobile devices, using your free tools and installing the top notch security tools, what you should use and when you should use it. So it's been a whole lot of fun. And no, we're not taking any more people into this class right now. But it's fun. I'm feeling alive. Again, this is really quite neat. A lot of work but you know, it is a whole lot of fun as well. So this morning I was on with Mr. Jack Heath, and we had a good little chat and we took a political angle to this whole presidential race and technology and what is happening out there hearing what's happening with stop and shop here in New England, which is a New England grocery store. Is this going to impact the whole country? Again, something here in New England getting pushed out, we got a presidential candidate and Volleyed. This is really something so here we go with Mr. Heath.

Jack Heath 1:30
Alright, joining us now on the Auto Fair listener lines. Our regular contributor. Our Tech Talk guy, Craig Peterson joins us in the Auto Fair listener lines. Good morning, Craig.

Craig 1:37
Hey, good morning. I don't know Jack if you heard about this 44 year old democrat who's running for president. And he's got a real interesting technology angle to his campaign. He's trying to fend off what he's calling the unemployment riots of that he says are on the way he said, we're in the middle of the third inning of the greatest economic and technology shift in human history is named to Andrew Yang. And he brings up an interesting point about jobs and technology and automation and where everything is going. He's trying to provide a soft landing for truckers and manufacturing workers who he believes are going to be out of work, frankly, pretty soon here. Jack.

Jack 2:21
It's interesting you say that Craig early early morning I was listening and watching or reading a story that's I believe, correct me if I'm wrong, I believe, stop and shop unionized workers are potentially looking at a strike because they are in the middle of a deal. But one of the workers interviewed when asked what's their beef because they are I guess, in the retail grocery world, some of the higher paid but for example, deli workers and others, they're talking about that Stop and Shop and baggers and you know, cashiers there's so much replacement with technology, that's one reason why they're looking at possibly striking that they're, they're sort of taking their jobs and replace it with technology.

Justin 3:03
I don't use those automatic checkouts. Because I feel like it's eventually that's all there will be. And if you know, I don't like if I'm running my own groceries out, you know, do I get a check at the end of the week? You know, do I get to fill out a W two? What's going on there?

Jack 3:15
No, I it's funny. I liked I like to go through the human part. But But that's an interesting thing. So this person saying that we're going to see a lot of displacement and that's been talked about.

Craig 3:26
Yeah, and but you know, it's always been talked about. We were worried about what would happen if all the people took care of the horses once the horseless carriage came in, but you know, Justin, ultimately, where this is going and Jack and everybody is you're not going to check out yourself. You're just going to walk around the store, pull things off the shelf and walk out of the store, because it's all going to be automated. We are.

Jack Unknown 3:48
That's what Amazon's trying to do, right.

Craig 3:50
Yeah, exactly. And we're talking about nearly 10,000 of the 15,000 members of the Union there at Stop and Shop devoted to the would strike because of that. So it's a difficult thing. We've always had this with new technology. I don't think it's going away. And frankly, Jack, I think it's interesting that it's entered into the whole presidential race. 

Jack 4:14 
Interesting. All right. Well, and you know, the other thing I was thinking of you on this morning, Craig Peterson with Tech Talk is, you know, again, another big another big story is Karen Curtis with a local news talk, radio station and Florida pelt. Palm Beach has joined us saying for Robert Kraft, the Patriots owner, it's a misdemeanor in Florida what he's charged with, but it's a PR nightmare. And the social media coming out of this on Friday over the weekend. And I looked at some of the Florida, the Jupiter and that area, new sites. The social media is where the real fire comes from these stories.

Craig 4:48
it does in it. And that's impossible to crouch. It doesn't matter how rich you are, you know, you can't go pay off some local reporter to try and keep it down or maybe work with the local police department. Once that word gets out. Jack on the social media, there's a lot of people that just love to tear other people down. There's no way to stop it. But you know it it is a small misdemeanor, frankly, it's illegal, it's a crime, etc, etc. But normally, something like this would not get a whole lot of attention. You know, you mentioned earlier that the PR is where he's really going to get nailed here. But when it comes to social media, it doesn't matter. You know, we've heard just a rumor of a rumor and it spreads across the country versus the old days where it took something really substantial before there. There was much talk in the media.

Jack 5:40
Before the newspaper was read are delivered. might have been a few weeks before you'd hear something or a few days now. It's a few seconds. Thank you, Craig Peterson Tech Talk. http://CraigPeterson/.om. Thanks Craig.

Craig 5:52
Thanks, Jack.

Craig 5:53
All right. That's it for today. I will be back tomorrow with of course, Jim Polito. I always have so much fun on with him, and will will also on Wednesday. Be back with our friends in Maine. And then Thursday and Friday. I've been trying to do my Security Thing podcasts. But I'm so busy with this course. I've had a little bit of trouble with that. But I'm going to really try and do it this week as well. And today if you are an FBI Infragard member I have webinar for you this afternoon. So Craig's keeping busy plus I was approached by a CEO group here, mastermind group of some pretty big companies to speak to them, maybe do a half a day for them on some of the security stops. I gotta get a proposal together for that and more. Anyhow, I will talk to you guys tomorrow. Always make time for this. I think it's important. So take care. Bye bye.

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Feb 22, 2019

YouTube and Soft Porn? There is a YouTuber, named Matt Watson who exposed what he called a wormhole into a soft core pedophilia ring and posted this out on YouTube. In less than a week he essentially caused the cut off of advertising, some very big advertisers on YouTube. I'll tell you more about that today.

You know, I've been warning you about these smart devices and today there is a real-world example of the bad guys at work and the true invasion of our private lives.  

The Dark Web is in the News.  We'll talk about what it is, What's available. How do you access it? What you can find.

We've got Windows Defender. This is something I'm talking about in my new master course over the next couple of weeks.  Where I will teach how to secure your computers and secure them effectively.

Do you put things off?  We all do.  We'll talk a little bit that and procrastination. I will tell you about an extension for Chrome that just might help you out.

Facebook may not be trying to protect the rest of us, but they are trying to protect their own. Yes, indeed, Facebook is using its apps to track people. And we'll tell you why and how.

Flipping Houses.  Has it ever intrigued you?  I know it has me. Now, Zillow is helping you get the information you need if you are interested in buying or selling properties. They have a couple of new tools that I will talk to you about. 

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

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Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/23/2019

Flipping Houses The Hitech Way - Smart TVs Chrome sticks Hacked For-Profit - Pedophile Ring Operating On YouTube

Craig Peterson: 0:00
Here we go again Craig Peterson. Man we just keep pushing to that thousand week mark this is so cool. I have to thank everybody course at Clear Channel and iHeart and even before it was either one of those for putting up with me all these years and for you guys for listening right. If it wasn't for listeners there just wouldn't be a radio show and podcast. So, hey thank you very much. Of course, you can listen to me live on iHeart app. I'm not sure why they're podcasting isn't picking me up but yeah we never been able to resolve that maybe I should get somebody to work on that one as well because there was a lot of people that really enjoy it and if you want to listen to the podcast it's just http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes and you'll find it right there. I'm also on a bunch of other ones. I'm in a SoundCloud I think I'm know I'm in TuneIn and a few of these other distribution networks out there. So have a look for it Tech Talk with Craig Peterson and don't get confused with this other guy that's been trying to steal my name and my show out in the Seattle area. No, no, no, no, it's me. I have a kind of distinctive voice. And so from that, hopefully you'll be able to figure out which one is which. Because I am the original

Now, okay, moving on. Today, we've got as usual, a whole ton of stuff. Our email should be back to usual for you guys. So, this morning, Saturday morning, you should have received the weekly show notes and those show notes go through all of the articles that I think are worth covering in the news. So let's get going. We've got a YouTuber here who has cut off essentially, he has caused the cut off of advertising, some big advertisers on YouTube will tell you about that. You know, I've been warning you about these smart devices that are out there. We're going to tell you about why. Here's a real-world example of what a bad guy has been doing. And he says he's going to stop doing it now. The dark web, what is it? What can you access? How do you access it? What can you find, and we've got Windows Defender. This is something I'm talking about in the course, my master course over the next couple of weeks about how to secure your computers and secure them effectively. So we'll talk a little bit about that and procrastination. This is kind of cool. How many of us get on the computer, we open up Chrome, we start poking around on the internet. And we end up wasting a lot of time. Well here's a Chrome extension that might help you out. Facebook may not be trying to protect the rest of us, but they are trying to protect their own. Yes, indeed, Facebook is using its apps to track people. And we'll tell you why and how. And we'll start out with this one because I think this is really cool. You've probably heard of Zillow before, it's an app. It's a website. I've used it before, you know, you go into a nice neighborhood or area of the country and say, Wow, I wonder what it costs to buy a house here. So you pop up Zillow and Zillow comes up and says, hey, yeah, here's what it costs and in this town, and here's all the houses are for sale that even now tells you about rentals and rental availability. And Zillow has been keeping a very close eye on the real estate market. It's pretty much right almost all the time. It even has a tool that will estimate what a house is worth. So it'll have its little Zillow estimate. It'll let you know what the taxes are, what the was paid for that house originally kind of pulls it all together.

Now, you've been watching on TV, there's, I think it's home and garden TV, HDTV. My wife loves this channel, and some of the stuff that's out on it. But they have these house flipping shows, there are these twin brothers that do one, there are these people in Waco, Texas, a husband and wife, I guess they're having marital issues. Now, I'm not sure. But this whole Magnolia thing and how popular it is, it's gotten so popular that even our target has picked up her chain of household decorations and everything, which is really kind of cool. When you get right down to it. And think about it. She has really built an empire along with her husband, I think it's mainly her. But you know, it's hard to tell, maybe it's him driving it. And she's just the voice for the most part. But she's definitely the decorator type. Well, these shows have become very popular, they are inexpensive to produce, at least for the most part. And the idea is that the host, and I only mentioned two shows there's a lot of them, but the idea is the hosts go in, they find a house maybe a distressed house somebody's about to get foreclosed on or something else is happening. But they find the house and they try and buy it at a deal. And oftentimes they are on foreclosed homes and they don't get a chance to inspect them beforehand. But they're still able to make a bunch of money. And that's how they're compensated. Of course, they get money from the show's production company. And there may be other money's involved to go between all of these different people involved. It's fairly expensive, obviously to produce a show. But, because the host can make so much money it costs a lot less to produce these shows and people love them right. I like those shows also where they go to different parts of the world. I saw when they were in Panama and they the show that couple three different properties and they have to decide which one they want to buy and sell your their guests and against your wife trying to figure out what it is right? Aren't those things kind of cool. Obviously, I'm not the only one that likes these just based on the numbers that are out there. And if you've seen them, you might have thought a little bit about maybe flipping a house. And there have been ads on this radio station that I'm on and others for seminars you can attend where they'll teach you everything you need to know about how to make money fast, and you do it in the real estate market. And you use other people's money. I took Bob Allen's course. read his book, and he and Mark Victor Hansen got together they put together this whole thing and I bought it all and I went to some of the seminars. I've been to these before. Multi-day seminars on buying houses and flipping them and things. I never did it because it wasn't something I was comfortable doing. You know what do I know, I certainly have done renovations in my own home before and I mean, done them, you know, built everything. Built the cabinets from scratch, and, and the whole nine yards. So, I know a little bit about it. But I never felt comfortable enough to go out and do it all on my own. How about you guys, right?

I guess it's the same thing with computer security. Most of the people that signed up for this latest master course for me were kind of wondering, what should they do? How should they do it? They didn't even know where to start. And that's kind of where I would be. And even after attending these seminars, these live events, I didn't feel comfortable enough to go out and start flipping houses, right. Well, this is interesting when we tie in Zillow because you can use it a little in order to kind of figure out is there a house I should flip. And bottom line if you are going to be buying homes and flipping them, which means you're going to renovate them, you're going to turn them into a valuable property from whatever they are now and sell it for a higher price. And hopefully higher than what it cost you to buy it and renovate it. Right? That's what flipping is when talking about flipping a house. So hopefully, you know the neighborhood. Everybody that I've read and the seminars I've attended, say get to know a neighborhood. It might be your neighborhood. It might be a close by neighborhood but know everything, know all of the houses, what are they sold for? What are they really worth? How long have they been sitting on the market? That information can help you also get a really good deal on a house.

Now, remember, I mentioned Zillow. Have you used Zillow before? Have you wondered what their model is? How do they really make money? It is obvious that they're taking somebody from the real estate agents that are are advertising in there and the leads that they're getting from Zillow. But, this is very interesting because Zillow is now getting in the house flipping business. Isn't that something. So you can now go on to Zillow. And this is cool, I even saw an ad I have it up on my website. When you look at this article that came out of Bloomberg, they have a little ad that right out of a print media about flipping your house, my you know, we want to buy your home. So people have these problems all the time where they're trying to sell their home, but they can't buy a new home until they sold the current home. And once I sold the current home, they're in real trouble now, because I got to get out of that home and 30 days or 60 days, whatever it is, which means that's all the time they have to find a new home and that just not going to work out very well for them. Been in that position before. So should I do repairs on the house before I sell it? How much repair should I do? Should I just paint the walls white, I've got to replace this floor or that flooring. I gotta fix this roof leak that's been there for a long time, right? All of these things you guys have dealt with this before. Right? And if you've ever sold a house.

Well, the company that came up with this whole business thing and came up with the programs and the website. And now the apps have something called Zestimates. Z-E-S-T, Just like Zillow. Z-I-L-L-O-W. You check it out if you haven't checked out that app or website yet.

But Zestimates now, and it's kind of a Kelley Blue Book for American homes. And they've started an instant offers business. The idea behind this is if you think you want to sell your home, you go on to the Zillow site and you get a Zestimate. And the whole idea behind this is Zillow has a pretty good idea of what your house might be worth. Because they're using some machine learning. They have all of this data about homes that have been sold in your neighborhood in your town, and what they're all worth. So if you sign up for this, it's part of this whole new breed of high tech home flippers. They've been called iBuyers before. There are some Silicon Valley startups that are doing this and real estate brokerages that have instant offer operations as well. So Zillow has kind of pulled this all together the information from Wall Street, and the finances and Silicon Valley capital, and all of these algorithms they've developed. And they can make very detailed and fine and correct really predictions about home prices.

So, these investors are buying homes on a massive scale. And because it's such a big scale, unlike the Magnolia people we talked about before, they only have to make a just a small profit out of each flip. So that's putting these real estate investors that have been flipping homes the old fashioned way, it's putting them in a bit of a bad spot. But it's interesting because this Bloomberg article goes through a specific example in the Phoenix area. And what happened was, they listed their home, they weren't sure what to do, what to fix what not to fix, normally, what would happen, right, you'd have a real estate agent come out, they look at the house and say, Well, if you fix the bathroom, you're going to get your money out. If you do the kitchen, you're not going to get your money out. And you got to fix the roof because it's got a second roofline or whatever, all of those things are right. And then you do it and you have your fingers crossed, that you're going to be able to sell that house at some point in the future. Well, in this case, what happens is Zillow make some really good estimates based on what's happening in your neighborhood. And they now have this great opportunity because they might make a good deal on it. So they hire someone to come out at that point and look at your house. So they have an appraiser who comes out and has a quick look around, makes sure there's nothing like terrible with your house, which would lower its value on the market. And then Tada, you're done. It's just absolutely amazing.

So, you know, agents in the past have really resented Zillow is market power. And they've been complaining about this whole idea behind this Zestimate and Zillow as had these estimates for a long time and saying that they're creating unrealistic expectations. But now Zillow with Zappraisal might be a way to put it has a very good business model and a very good idea of what your house is actually worth. So, keep an eye out for that if you're looking to buy a house right now today. You can go to Zillow and find out what there's Zestimate is their Zillow estimate for the value of the house. just generically speaking, assuming there are no major flaws in the home. And you can now also have Zillow buy your house from you and flip it. Now, because they only need a very small margin, you might actually do better on one of these Zillow flips. And they do charge like a six to I think it goes as high as 10%, which is higher than your normal real estate agent. But you're also guaranteed a sale and the sale is going to happen very quickly. So you know, I have to take all of that stuff into consideration when you're looking at it.

Well, we're going to come back here in just a second, I want to talk about this guy called TheHackerGiraffe and why my warnings about smart TVs are coming true, what he's been doing and why he's retiring. So, here we go.

So, this guy calls himself or called himself, I guess TheHackerGiraffe. And he said he's retired from hacking smart TVs. This is really, really interesting, because, you know, I've warned about this before, before, excuse me, we've had manufacturers who have installed cameras in your TV. And the idea is, the TV looks back at you. It's watching you while you're watching TV. And the idea for that type of spying on people is to try and figure out are you paying attention. Are you paying attention during the ads, when you look away, who's in the room, there's facial recognition software, some of these vendors are using, so they know oh, this, it's this person. And they always watch this type of show. It's that person, oh, we've got a whole family in here recognizes there's like, three, four or five faces and how often they're watching TV. And of course, that's a true invasion of our privacy. And there was a great article this week about Paul Vixie, a guy who I've admired for years and loosely worked with on some of the DNS stuff. I've used his code forever, you know, kind of advanced, techie geeky stuff on the internet. But he was all upset because he installed a machine that was calling home. And it was, I think it was a Google Home device. And it wasn't using his DNS and there's no way to change. And, you know, these devices we're putting in our homes, and we're using this Internet of Things, frankly, can be dangerous, and it can be spying on us and worse and can be used to find out by the bad guys when are people not home. That's the time to rob the house. Right? It's breaking and entering versus some form of assault that might happen.

So people should be concerned very legitimately, I think, be concerned about all of this. And when you're talking about the smart TVs, there's, even more, this guy, TheHackerGiraffe, he hacked not just smart TVs, but he hacked these Google Chromecast streaming devices and others, and his whole idea was to promote a YouTuber that he liked. Have you heard of this guy, this PewDiePie guy, you might not have a very strange guy. Very, very strange guy. But he had a popular YouTube channel he did some things that kind of forced him out of favor and that was a problem because he started losing followers. I think in fact he got completely delisted off of YouTube and he managed to get back on.

Well apparently this guy, TheHackerGiraffe and I'm looking at this article from Graham Cluley, thanks for forwarding this along it's kind of interesting just see that I don't know that he was paid I think he was paid yeah In fact he was he used Patreon in order to get paid but he was going out and hacking people's smart TV its TVs and smart TV devices and had it set up so that you turn on your TV you'd be watching a program or whatever and up would come and add to watch this PewDieGuy for his channel. There he was here's his YouTube channel click on it sort of thing it's kind of nuts when you think about it and he was doing it not just for PewDiePie he was doing for other people too.

Now I have long criticized the Huffington Post because they used black techniques in order to get followers. In other words, they cheated and lied, they did a lot of things that people have accused all kinds of people on the internet for doing but you know the ends justify the means to these people. And in this case, the Huffington Post the ends justified the means we got to get our message out there. So we've got to get bigger and stronger and last year and in fact, that's exactly what they did. Well by getting bigger and stronger, and nastier they increase their base. They  increase their base and then the rules changed and you could do the practice these dark arts back in the day to try and fool people into following your website but you couldn't do it anymore because they started getting clamped on people didn't like it and the FTC came after them saying this is illegal unfair etc and so they stopped doing it and it's not just the Huffington Puffington Post its many of these different websites and did it over the years.

So now this guy was paid to go on to your Smart TV or Chromecast devices and hack them to get you to watch their internet channel so a lot of people were asking them, Chromecast owners Why their TV suddenly showing a video promoting this YouTube superstar PewDiePie and Chromecast owners complained to Google who looked into this and started finding out oh wait a minute now this all happened because of again incorrectly configured routers that had this you p&p enabled you might have heard of this before. It's a way for you to get out to the internet and then have the internet get back to you. But it's interesting. Just because it's misconfigured doesn't give you carte blanche access to it right. I misconfigured my WiFi Why does that somehow mean to you that you have every right to kind of break in on me? That's the question.

And this guy, TheHackerGiraffe has decided he's going to retire. He posted his retirement notice online and we've seen the PewDiePie fans doing all kinds of things. Just last month, they defaced a section of the Wall Street Journal website. And of course, this TheHackerGiraffe guy and PewDiePie both claim they had no involvement in the attack. But it frankly it's interesting to look at right because we are seeing major changes in the internet and major changes in what we consider to be acceptable. So that brings us to Facebook and pedophiles. Believe it or not

I'm not saying that everybody is a pedophile on new I said Facebook, but it's YouTube on YouTube. But it's kind of interesting to look at this here. Obviously, not everybody is a pedophile on YouTube. And I'm also not saying that YouTube has pictures that are showing minors in various seriously compromising positions if you will.

But this is kind of interesting because a YouTuber by the name of Matt Watson just this week exposed what he called a wormhole into a soft core pedophilia ring. And he posted this out on YouTube. He uploaded it on Sunday. So it hasn't even quite been a week yet. But his video claim to reveal a frankly, what's not so underground YouTube community of adults who are encouraging very young children to upload videos of themselves in compromising situations. I don't want to go into all of this because it just disgusts me, frankly. And I'm sure would you too. Now what's happening here, because of this coming out, is major corporations have pulled all of their advertising from YouTube once this came out because remember, Facebook is supposed to be policing itself. In fact, it entered into an agreement with the Federal Trade Commission years ago about self-policing. And Facebook's been accused of not following through with the plea deal. YouTube is also trying to be self-policing. But remember I said we've seen a lot of changes over the years where you know what is acceptable is not the same today as it was a few years ago. Obviously, this is not acceptable. So all kinds of people pulled funding. YouTube's trying to figure out how can they deal with this how can they find the pictures because these are not naked pictures that are easy enough to find through a computer an algorithm that showing a certain percentage of skin etc right that you normally would look for for the typical pornography. So, in this case, it's very difficult for them.

There's a hashtag campaign over on Twitter and you might look it up if your Twitter user to find out more about this the hashtag is YouTubeWakeUp and within 24 hours these advertisers had caught on. It's crazy. We've got multiple ads from McDonalds Disney  Grammarly, Chromebook, Purina, IKEA, Glad, GNC, Lysol and many others that just said forget about this. So, Watson's calling this as a small victory. It certainly is a victory. This battle still ongoing. And frankly, the public's known for a long time about child exploitation on YouTube. But so far, YouTube has failed to adequately address the issue according to Watson and some of these other people out there.

Now, this video came out just days after multiple innocent YouTube channels were wrongly deleted after being flagged for tagging their videos with the abbreviation for child porn. And that happens all too often as well. Someone who doesn't like a YouTube channel, somebody that's a competitor in the financial space with a YouTube channel will go and flag, inappropriately flag content is being inappropriate wrong kitty porn etc. etc. So YouTube has a nightmare on their hands, right? It is like the boy who called wolf we just had that rest just this week an actor on TV who apparently came out and hired a couple of Nigerian guys, big bodybuilders to supposedly beat him up and put a noose around his neck and dump bleach on him. The accusations are flying on that front. But people do this kind of stuff all the time. So how is YouTube supposed to be able to deal with this? Even ads getting ads pulled down because of so-called inappropriate content or doesn't meet the Facebook guidelines or you know all across out there. It's difficult as an advertiser nowadays to figure this whole thing out. So interesting these videos that Watson exposes this week obviously slipped under the radar but we'll see what happens that YouTube if it simply enforces its rule that forbade uploads from users under the age of 13 that would have stopped all of these videos that we're just talking about.

So a lot more my website. Check it out. http://CraigPeterson.com. You can find everything we talked about today. Plus more including what Facebook's doing to people who threatened employees. Procrastination. This is great. a Chrome extension you should look that up. You'll find it on my website. Why Windows Defender antivirus is the most deployed antivirus and big, big businesses out there and what is the dark web how to access it what you'll find it's not all necessarily bad there certainly is enough of that but it's not all bad out there all of that. http://CraigPeterson.com, and make sure you get my newsletter because that's going to keep you up to date on all the security stuff and get you the weekly show notes as well.

Have a good great day and we'll see you next week. Take care. Bye-bye.

 --- 

Related articles:

What Is The Dark Web? How To Access It And What You’ll Find

Did Your Smart-Tv Start Showing You Shows You Didn’t Subscribe To?
“TheHackerGiraffe” Says He’s Retired From Hacking Smart Tvs To Promote Pewdiepie

Youtuber Claims Online Pedophile Ring Operates Freely On Youtube

Why Windows Defender Antivirus Is The Most Deployed In The Enterprise

Prevent Procrastination With This Chrome Extension

Facebook Uses Its Apps To Track Users It Thinks Could Threaten Employees And Offices

Zillow Wants To Flip Your House
---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

Follow me on Twitter for the latest in tech at:

www.twitter.com/craigpeterson

For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Feb 20, 2019

Craig joins Ken and Matt as he does every Wednesday morning. They talked about robocalls and the Super Mario Brothers video game that sells for $100,000. Craig also shared with Ken and Matt his best malware advice.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Robocalls And Phone Scams Are All The Rage In 2019

Unopened Copy Of Super Mario Bros Video Game Sells For Record $100k

---

 

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/20/2019

Best Malware Advice - What's My Mario Brothers' Worth - Spam Phone Calls

Craig Peterson 0:00
Hey everybody, bOy getting busy this week, I'm putting together all of the content for our course. And this is really exciting. This is, I'm so excited because this is gonna be the best course ever. Anyways, so everybody who signed up for this welcome aboard. Glad to have you here this morning I spoke with Mr. Ken and Matt we went over the this whole problem that we're having with frankly, these robocalls that are coming in. The spam calls the junk calls, what does it mean? What can we do about it? So we talked about that this morning. We also talked about our friends over at Nintendo here and is your game your Super Mario Brothers game worth $100,000 or more? A kind of an interesting question right. If you have one of those sitting around in your in your attic or your basement also I did some tech support help this morning for Ken which is kind of interesting because it ties in exactly with the course I'm doing right now but if you want little tech support help and want to know how to use secure your machines what's the best browsers and stop did that this morning with Ken as well. So here we go with Ken and Matt. Happy Wednesday.

Unknown 1:27
Back again and Craig Peterson is with us now as he always is Wednesdays at this time 7:38 on Wednesday Wednesday Wednesday. Craig, how are you this morning sir?

Unknown 1:37
I am I am I'm doing pretty well this morning. It's been a busy week and now almost winter again.

Unknown 1:45
Before, I have a question to ask you because I you know I was using Firefox and I started using Chrome and I opened this link and all these you know Orbits drops. It says, don't you want to buy an airplane ticket?

Unknown 2:01
Your PC may be infected right now. 

Unknown 2:05
So what is the spyware clean your computer program to put on,

Unknown 2:12
or we learned a lot from Wreck It Ralph. And Ralph breaks the internet. And I don't know if you've seen that movie. You

Unknown 2:19
know,

Unknown 2:24
the problem is, there's a little green guys running around trying to get you to click on things. So I think you're real question is, how do I stop those little green guys? Right? Yeah. Okay. Okay. How

Unknown 2:36
do I do my computer? How do I get rid of them? Do I get pest modern pest services?

Unknown 2:43
Yeah, that's kind of what you have to do. The pop up stuff is fairly easy to stop. Famous last words and what you do what I always do, and I do this in, in Firefox, which is a little better I should

Unknown 2:56
go back to Firefox. I don't know why my daughter told me to use Chrome stopping and going back to Yeah,

Unknown 3:03
yeah, it is. Firefox is much much safer with your information just in general, right? They're not out there trying to watch everything you do and sell it all in fact, they're they're very good about making sure they're up to date and blocking things but what's the best malware? That's such a good question and last week I started I had what four different cult courses classes last week for people free ones that I did. And that's one of the top questions and it's a kind of a difficult one to ask. It's kind of like you know, what's the best helmet to wear? Well, it depends and what it depends on is what you're trying to protect against because there's a lot of nastiness out there but here goes the drum roll because if you're running Windows you have a Windows machine then you're looking for the basic protection you can turn on Microsoft software and it's got Windows Defender get that turned on and Windows Firewall get that turned on and you're pretty safe as far as everything in general goes and then there's one more piece of software that I advise everybody to get and put on their machines and that's Malwarebytes. Malware-B-Y-T-E-S. It's very very good that was

Unknown 4:21
what

Unknown 4:23
that's what Matt suggested Malwarebytes

Unknown 4:25
ladies Florio Yes. Yes, exactly. And I got a great tip from Matt last week to with this this of Facebook plugin though. Are you enjoying? It

Unknown 4:37
isn't it's life changing? But

Unknown 4:39
whatever. What's that one?

Unknown 4:41
That's the one where you can filter your Facebook feed and get rid of all i don't

Unknown 4:45
i don't do Facebook. So I don't care. Maybe you would if you could filter? No, I'm not. No.

Unknown 4:50
Yeah, it actually works quite well. Yeah,

Unknown 4:54
Malwarebytes is really, really good. And then, you know, the Facebook stuff, there's a few the little filters, but built into Chrome, you can turn on pop up blocking, and I do that as well. So with Chrome, you go to your settings. And there's got to be there's a great search bar inside of the settings and look for pop up blockers. You can do the same thing on Safari, you can do the same thing on Firefox, it makes life much easier. Now, if you're a business, you can certainly use those basic pieces of software and Apple, if you keep up to date with your patches on Apple. It's even safer from the standard virus and hacker standpoint. And then Microsoft is, but since Windows seven Microsoft to ship with some of the stuff turned on. So there's your basics I really like. And this is what we use for our professional customers. I really like Cisco's, what they call AMP, which is their anti malware protection stack. And it's a bunch of different software. But there's one other thing you guys got to do, right? So I mentioned carry on all of your default stuff right now, at least on turn it off use Malwarebytes, but there's something out there called OpenDNS. And this is a lifesaver. This is probably one of the best things you can do as well. And it's also available for free or really, really, really, really cheap depending on what you're trying to do. And what OpenDNS does is when your computer tries to find where to go online. So you type in google.com, it has to turn that name into an address. So it has to be turned into an internet address, because that's the only way to get around. Right. It's not it's like a sort of Ken's house. So where's Ken's house? Well, now you have to look it up in the phone book. Right Ken? Right. And it's 123 mainstream street in Scarborough, Maine. It's the same sort of a thing. So what happens with OpenDNS, if you're using that is the computer says, Okay, well, where's Google that it's trying to find the address and sort of asks, in this case, if you set it up, right? Ask OpenDNS, OpenDNS, okay, well, he's he's 123 Main Street, and off you go, everything's wonderful.

But if you have some malware, if you have some evil software on your site, or let's say it's trying to drive you to some adware based site or trying to get you to go somewhere you shouldn't have be cooked on something you shouldn't have is going to ask, Hey, how do I get to the Kaminski house over there in Moscow, Russia, OpenDNS is looking at that and say, Whoa, wait a minute, we know those Kaminski guys and they're tied into this unabomber guy and this is a bad place to go. And so it OpenDNS as at that point is it stops you from going there and pops up a little while doesn't pop up. But it comes up a little message on your browser saying that's an evil place to go but it also stops malware that's on your computer so one of the first things this evil software does matter where does is it phones home just like ET and tries to figure out what do you want me to do next to do you want me to infect next. Our evil plan to take over the world. And so it tries to call home so how does it call home it does the same thing it says hey I want to call home and it goes to mask OpenDNS. OpenDNS says I know who you are I'm not letting you call home and we're talking about even on their paid plan one or two bucks a computer a month just stop the bad guys from calling home. It's phenomenal OpenDNS look it up now there's better software than that we tend to use Cisco Umbrella which is the next level up from OpenDNS but there you go I just gave you my best tip ever can they keep faith and and it's Mac and Windows okay so is it just across the board is great

Unknown 8:57
doing it

Unknown 8:58
okay all right so Craig Peterson joins us at this time every Wednesday and he tells us about all the things that can needs to know about his computer I've noticed Craig by the way that on my phone I had installed a like a robo killer app which had been reasonably effective for the past few months in stopping this avalanche This is waterboarding effort of these people to try to just destroy my phone and get like a call every 30 minutes or so but in the last two weeks like I don't know if they're getting around it they got new numbers whatever but now I'm starting to get more of these stupid robo scam thing calls and whatnot again and they're always the same they're always some insurance thing or they always have a warranty to sell me or or whatnot but there's also some people that are actually like literally scamming you and saying that you know you owe money and you got to pay the police department or whatever talk to me about phone scams and 29 in 2019

Unknown 9:55
Yeah, IRS, etcetera etcetera. I've gotten most as well and the FCC just released these results of a new study. And it's a welcome to 2019 guess what half of all cell phone calls give or take this year are projected to be spam calls these these junk calls, or worse their their phishing attack phishing P-H. Not the not the kind with the line and the hook but what they're trying to do is hook you so they call up I got I was on the floor of a conference and I was actually the exhibitor and I got calls from the IRS. And like, repeatedly, you have to send money and how do you pay the IRS? Well, it turns out from this phone call that I have to buy Apple gift cards and send them to the IRS in order to make good on my debt to

Unknown 10:51
it's just crazy. So what do you do? Oh, my gosh. Well, yet you're using Hiya right, Matt? Yes. Okay. Yeah. Hiya, H-I-Y-A is very good at stopping these just in general. But it's gotten so bad because they're, they're using your local area code and prefix when they're calling you. So if a call comes in, and it looks like it's from your neighbor, because it's your neighborhood phone number, you're more likely to answer it, then it's easy to fake and they're continually faking it. And there's no end to this insight. And I hate to say that, so let me tell you what I do. Okay, guys, I've set my iPhone into Do Not Disturb mode. Now, that can be a problem, because there's people who you want to call you. Well,

Unknown 11:43
they want to be disturbed, right? Yes.

Unknown 11:46
Yeah, exactly. So on the iPhone, what's really nice is I can put it in Do Not Disturb mode. And then I can say, if someone's in my contact list, let the call through. So I have a I have thousands of contacts in my phone. And so if any of them call me it goes right through to my phone. But you know, between us nowadays, when you call someone you kind of expect to get voicemail so if it's not someone who knows you really well, and they end up in your voicemail because you have Do Not Disturb turned on and you have habitat of culture contacts through and great, okay, so your wife's college kids calls, etc. going to come right through. But somebody that you haven't spoken to, in 10 years might go to voicemail. I don't think that's a big deal. But that's what I've done. I've got higher running, I ended up buying the paid version, which is pretty good. And then on top of it now, because it's gotten so bad. And the FCC is agreeing with us. We're not crazy, at least not about this Matt, that, hey, this is going to get worse. So take a look at that. On the Android side. There's a bunch of apps that you can put on your phone. Apple doesn't let apps begin to your phone calls away. Android does. So there's a lot of different options in the Android space. But I have found this to be very, very effective.

Unknown 13:15
We are talking to Craig Peterson, he joins us every single Wednesday. Right around this time. I you know, Craig I was kind of I don't know a lot about video by new I remember Mario Brothers and and because I they were kind of cute. And they ran around a lot. Why would Why would a a video game sell for $100,000?

Unknown 13:42
I mean, seriously, What? Why? Why?

Unknown 13:46
Well, it wasn't 100,000 100,000

Unknown 13:55
Yeah, it's

Unknown 13:56
it's interesting because this version of the video games it was sealed. It was unopened. Now just because you have one that might be sealed and unopenedn, it's not probably going to sell $100,000. This was a special version at only sold in New York. And Los Angeles was called sticker sealed so it has a special sticker on it. And it was also certified by this gaming authority of some sort. 

Unknown 14:25
So it's a collectors' item is what you're saying?

Unknown 14:27
big time Okay, big time. But you know, a lot of people loved it. It was one of the big first big games frankly out there for the Nintendo 1985 was when of course it was this version of the game was released. There were some that were a little bit earlier than this but that's why it's sold for that so don't go out digging them up from the basement of the attic. The odds are excellent. Your Nintendo game is probably worth at least $5 okay but it's probably not 100,000

Unknown 14:58
that's such a bummer oh

Unknown 15:01
alright

Unknown 15:02
we're up

Unknown 15:03
Craig Peterson our tech guru joins us at this time every Wednesday and this was no exception appreciate it Craig thanks so much for joining us

Unknown 15:11
I'm gonna go to that Malwarebytes place

Unknown 15:15
yeah hey if you guys want access to that training I did last week I did record it it's a few hours worth of it all about security stuff just send me an email just me@CraigPeterson.com and and I'd be glad to make it available to Ken or anybody else who wants to. Just me@CraigPeterson.com.

Unknown 15:34
all right there it is. Ladies and gentlemen Craig Peterson the man the myth the legend is with us as usual and we'll talk again next week Craig.

Unknown 15:40
happy wetness day

Unknown 15:43
wetness day indeed. Alright, so coming up at 8:08.

Unknown 15:48
That's part of the reason I do these. These hits here on the radio. It's just so much fun. Sometimes. I have fun with these guys. They're a little bit of play around. Anyways, hope you're going to have a great we talk to you later. I'm going back to the treadmill today. Yeah. Isn't that fun? Go Craig. Start an exercise again. Have a great day. Bye bye.

---

More stories and tech updates at:

www.craigpeterson.com

Don't miss an episode from Craig. Subscribe and give us a rating:

www.craigpeterson.com/itunes

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For questions, call or text:

855-385-5553

Feb 19, 2019

Craig is on the Jim Polito Show. This morning they talked about Microsoft dragging the Internet Explorer to the trash. They also talked about robocalls and how you can avoid them. And a little friendly teasing about Craig being Canadian.

These and more tech tips, news, and updates visit - CraigPeterson.com

---

Related Articles:

Robocalls And Phone Scams Are All The Rage In 2019

Microsoft: Drag Internet Explorer To The Trash. No, Really
---

Transcript:

Below is a rush transcript of this segment, it might contain errors.

Airing date: 02/19/2019

Microsoft's Surprise Announcement - New FCC Study Doesn't Look Good

Craig Peterson: 0:00
Hey, hello everybody. You might hear my little Roomba going in the studio in the background. I was on with Jim Polito this morning. We talked about a couple of different things. One is what's up with all of these phone calls we're getting? The FCC has some new statistics out talking about what's going to happen here in 2019. And we also had a little bit of fun because, you know, Jim and I were kind of those kind of guys, right. So first of all, he was teasing me more than a little bit about be Canadian now, which is, you know, come on really, really Canadian. And then we also talked about Microsoft and their crazy surprising admission. So all of that and more stick around here we go. And thanks everybody. By the way, who signed up for the master course and who attended the classes last week. I think things went great. So here we go with Jim.

Jim Polito 0:57
He really is one of my favorite segments of the week because we all bask in the genius that is our Tech Talk guru Craig Peterson. And here is the aforementioned bright star. Good morning, Craig.

Craig 1:13
Hey, good morning, Jim. And we had a lot of people here over the last week, get on those little seminars, webinars, training that I had put on for free we had we had about I think it was about 400 people. So that's fantastic. And we went through backups and what to do and how to do it and how to configure the Wi Fi to make it secure. You know just some basic security stuff that everybody needs so i i was tickled pink that that many people were happy to be there. And of course, a resolve free by the it was phenomenal. And then I offered afterwards if they wanted some more help. But anyways, it's it's great to see the interest Jim and we got the bad guys on the run.

Jim 1:59
Yeah, that's great. And folks, at the end of this segment, we're going to tell you how you can get on Craig's list. And again, see how we offer this free webinar. He's not going to try to sell you anything. He's not going to hound you. And he's not going to give your name to other companies so that they can try to sell you something. It is a free service that our Tech Talk guru provides and will tell you how you can get on board. And and while he did this webinar, when there's a big crisis, he's the guy you want giving you the straight story because if he can explain it to me, he can explain it to anybody. So hey, I want to go with something funny to start with. And that I want to get into robo calls. But Microsoft is telling people to drag Internet Explorer into the trash. I mean, I'm surprised that there's still people who haven't done that. But why don't you, why don't you explain? I mean, I mean, I look at Internet Explorer. Now, the way I look at Netscape, does Netscape even exist anymore?

Craig 3:09
Yeah, well, it Yeah, no. Internet Explorer, of course, was the the kind of pivotal, their key product. In fact, it was based on some of the Netscape stuff from way back when, and, and some others, but anyways, it is a piece of trash. There's no two ways about it. I've been telling people to stop using it for forever. And there are so many reasons for it. And one of the big reasons is, it's not supported anymore, which means two things for everybody Jim. What it means that people are not going to get the full internet experiences they want to get. Because frankly, there are people who are designing websites and web apps and things are not testing against Internet Exploder, I mean, Explorer. 

Jim 4:14
Did you just say what I thought you just said?

Craig 4:17
I did. Yeah, Internet Exploder. That's kind of our pet name for it. So they're not developing forward, so you don't get the good experience anymore. In fact, if you are a developer, you know that for at least 10 years, you have to develop a website for everything else in the world, Google Chrome, and Firefox, and Opera and Epic and all these different browsers. So that's great. You got one website, and then you have to upload another website for Internet Explorer, which is crazy. So you're not going to be getting the right experience. And it just doesn't have the security updates anymore. So Microsoft's Chris Jackson said he was talking about this uses the perils of using Internet Explorer as your default browser. Now, there are a lot of people who are listening, who might work for medical, you know, like a hospital or something, and they're still stuck in the Exploder world, in those cases, because again, they develop their own software, and the people who are developing it weren't very good and didn't realize maybe I shouldn't say that, because some of them might be listening. They're the best in the world. But they were stuck with Internet Explorer. And you know, in this day and age, you're using Chrome or you're using Firefox or use Epic if you're really concerned about your security out there. Who would have thought that Microsoft and finally admit that you should drag Internet Explorer into the trash?

Jim 5:42
The thing is, now, if you have antivirus software, it will to some extent protect you. But if Microsoft themselves if they're not fixing Explorer, there's only so much you're antivirus software can do, right?

Craig 6:03
Yeah, you're absolutely right about that. Because what we're really talking about here is a huge, huge problem for for people. Microsoft is warning you that you're not going to get the right experience. Many websites don't even work with Internet Explorer anymore. You don't get the advanced. Yeah. And then on top of it, there are vulnerabilities so yeah, you're right about the security side. Jim. 

Jim 6:26
All right. We're talking with Craig Peterson, our Tech Talk guru. And at the end of this segment, I'm going to give you, well, he's going to give you a number that you can text my name to, and you'll get a lot of great free information and standard data and text rates apply. But don't worry about it. You get all this great stuff. Okay. robocalls. And phone scams are all the rage in 2019. I can attest to this and we've talked about this before. Bye. I get at least three calls a day from a number in the Brockton exchange. Now let me explain why. When I lived elsewhere, for some reason, when I changed my phone number, and this was a long time ago I got a Brockton exchange. And if you know anything about Brockton is a little bit of a rough town, nothing against everybody in Brockton. But it's a little bit of a rough town. So the first time I call people on my cell phone, generally they see a Brockton exchange and I say, I'm not talking to this guy. I don't know why I got Brockton. But I got that number decades ago and I don't want to give it up. But I get these calls from a Brockton exchange all the time. And I know it's a scam. And it's interesting how they think, well, we'll make it a local call. So Jim will pick it up, when in fact, it's probably what in the Ukraine, I'm getting the phone call from?

Craig 8:04
Yeah, there are a lot of places all around the world, they typically user A team. And what this is, is a spam call, right? So they've got someone who speaks English usually quite well. And they represented their debt collector, or they're from the IRS or they're from your bank. And the list just goes on and on. And the FCC just released a study they put together and the FCC saying that nearly half of all cell phone calls, and nearly half of them are going to be spam.

Jim 8:44 
Are you kidding?

Craig 8:46 
Half of them. Now, I can say for me, you know, I use that Hiya app, which is really helpful. But for me, I would say it is closer to 90% of my calls, or spam.

Jim 8:54
Danny is saying, Danny, you use the Hiya app.

Danny 8:57 
I use the Hiya and it stops a lot of them. But like that one, I have a Framingham exchange number, and I get a Framingham call every day it won't stop that one. It stops a lot of the other ones.

Craig 9:07
Yeah, it should give you a little warning, Danny that says possible.

Danny 9:11
It does. Yeah, and I know exactly who it is. But yeah, some of the other hires, you can just cut it off completely.

Craig 9:16
Yeah, I don't even see them. You and I would have ended up doing, and people might consider this themselves. And I kind of hate to say this, but I, you know, there's a lot of people I know. And I have all the people I know in my contacts includes everybody from LinkedIn, all of my customers and stuff. So I have like 5,000 contacts in my phone. And what I've done is I went into settings on my iPhone, and I put it into Do Not Disturb mode. And then so what happens is, you don't get any calls. You don't get any text. You don't get anything. And then there is an option in Do Not Disturb that says, but allow calls from my contacts.

Jim 10:00
Oh.

Craig 10:02 
Yeah. Tricky eh? So now if somebody.

Jim 10:04
Wait, wait, wait, wait, wait. You just said eh. Danny caught it too. Danny looked right at me when you said eh, Craig. You can take you can take the boy out of Canada, but you can't take the Canada out of the boy. Go ahead. Go ahead. Mr. Peterson

Craig 10:25 
It's a beauty eh? 

Jim 10:28
There it is. There it is. Talking Bob McKenzie.

Craig 10:30
Yeah. Exactly. Oh my gosh, back in the day, Anyways, what I do is I put my phone into Do Not Disturb mode. And then I say allow my contacts to come through. So anybody who's a contact of mine, if they call or text it's going to come right through to me. What that means is, everybody else is going to be blocked by Hiya entirely, like I never even knew they called unless I go into the app. Or they're going to get pushed over into voicemail because my phone isn't going to even alert me that someone's calling. And then I have to call them back which in this day and age how many people actually expect to speak to a person as opposed to voicemail anyways? Yeah, so so that's been my work around and with 50% of calls this year projected to be spam calls, junk calls, scam calls. You know, something people might want to consider

Jim 11:28
And look, is there any risk was one of these apps of me losing an important call. There can't be. Oh, there is

Craig 11:37
There is. There is because it's it. First of all Hiya is based on calls that people are reporting so if someone calls from 555-1212 and the call comes through to somebody and then they report it as a scam call if a couple of more people report that numbers a scam call then Hiya is gonna say okay this is a scam because they don't do any real investigation into it. There's just too many of them and there's hundreds of thousands of numbers now in Hiya. So yes, if you're if you're waiting for that call from your your new great job, you're not going to want to have Hiya turned on and you're not going to want to have your phone on do not disturb mode because they can get blocked and no question about it.

Jim 12:23
Okay. Now, Craig, as we said, if you want to get this information and have access to the genius that is Tech Talk guru Craig Peterson what you do is text my name Jim to this number

Craig 12:38
855-385-5553. That's 855-385-5553.

Jim 12:47
That's right. Standard data and text rates apply. But you'll get great information and like this free webinar that was done over the weekend by Craig Peterson. Great information. Craig. Always a pleasure eh?

Craig 13:04
Hey, take care. 

Jim 13:05
Take care. Bye-bye. Yeah. You hoser, right. Craig. Thanks. Craig Peterson, everybody. Our Tech Talk guru. I got to make sure that I send him a card on July 1 Canada Day. Yes, they have Canada Day on July 1 because they wanted to be like us.

Craig 13:24
It was funny. Anyhow, I hope you're enjoying these let me know what you think. I've gotten a lot of great comments from people. You can leave a comment on iTunes that really helps to get the word out. The more people that subscribe to my podcast and leave five star reviews and hopefully you would as well on iTunes. The more people that find out about this podcast so go to iTunes while actually here's the easiest one, http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. How's that for easy? http://CraigPeterson.com/iTunes. I'd really appreciate it then it's going to help to get the word out. Take care. Have a great day and we will be back tomorrow.

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